Form N-CSR T. Rowe Price Internatio For: Oct 31

December 23, 2019 8:48 AM EST

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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM N-CSR

CERTIFIED SHAREHOLDER REPORT OF REGISTERED
MANAGEMENT INVESTMENT COMPANIES
 
 

Investment Company Act File Number: 811-02958

T. Rowe Price International Funds, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in charter)
 
100 East Pratt Street, Baltimore, MD 21202

(Address of principal executive offices)
 
David Oestreicher
100 East Pratt Street, Baltimore, MD 21202

(Name and address of agent for service)
 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (410) 345-2000
 
 
Date of fiscal year end: October 31
 
 
Date of reporting period: October 31, 2019





Item 1. Reports to Shareholders

(a) Report pursuant to Rule 30e-1.

T. Rowe Price Annual Report
Emerging Europe Fund
October 31, 2019
TREMX Investor Class
TTEEX I Class

Beginning on January 1, 2021, as permitted by SEC regulations, paper copies of the T. Rowe Price funds’ annual and semiannual shareholder reports will no longer be mailed, unless you specifically request them. Instead, shareholder reports will be made available on the funds’ website (troweprice.com/prospectus), and you will be notified by mail with a website link to access the reports each time a report is posted to the site.

If you already elected to receive reports electronically, you will not be affected by this change and need not take any action. At any time, shareholders who invest directly in T. Rowe Price funds may generally elect to receive reports or other communications electronically by enrolling at troweprice.com/paperless or, if you are a retirement plan sponsor or invest in the funds through a financial intermediary (such as an investment advisor, broker-dealer, insurance company, or bank), by contacting your representative or your financial intermediary.

You may elect to continue receiving paper copies of future shareholder reports free of charge. To do so, if you invest directly with T. Rowe Price, please call T. Rowe Price as follows: IRA, nonretirement account holders, and institutional investors, 1-800-225-5132; small business retirement accounts, 1-800-492-7670. If you are a retirement plan sponsor or invest in the T. Rowe Price funds through a financial intermediary, please contact your representative or financial intermediary or follow additional instructions if included with this document. Your election to receive paper copies of reports will apply to all funds held in your account with your financial intermediary or, if you invest directly in the T. Rowe Price funds, with T. Rowe Price. Your election can be changed at any time in the future.

T. ROWE PRICE EMERGING EUROPE FUND

HIGHLIGHTS

The Emerging Europe Fund delivered substantial gains in its fiscal year ended October 31, 2019, but underperformed the MSCI Emerging Markets Europe Index Net.
 
Stock selection in Russia and our off-benchmark exposure to Georgia and Romania hurt relative performance. Our underweights to both Poland and Turkey, as well as our stock selection within the latter, helped relative returns.
 
We made a number of changes among our Russian oil and gas holdings, resulting in an overall overweight to Russia. We remain underweight Turkey, with a focus on selective high-quality names, particularly those that are beneficiaries of weakness in the lira.
 
We maintain a long-term investment horizon and exposure to well-managed companies that we believe can generate solid, superior earnings growth over time.

Log in to your account at troweprice.com for more information.

*Certain mutual fund accounts that are assessed an annual account service fee can also save money by switching to e-delivery.

CIO Market Commentary

Dear Shareholder

Global markets recovered from a tumultuous start to deliver solid results for your fund’s fiscal year, the 12-month period ended October 31, 2019. The U.S. Federal Reserve switched course and joined other dovish central banks around the world to support markets following a sharp sell-off in December. This action, combined with better-than-feared corporate earnings, helped propel many equity indices during the year to double-digit gains. The S&P 500 Index reached an all-time high, and Europe’s Stoxx 600 Index was trading near a record close at the end of the period. Growth stocks in the U.S. were the strongest performers, but nearly all developed markets and most emerging markets also delivered strong gains.

The U.S. dollar finished with mixed results versus other currencies during the 12-month reporting period. A relatively strong greenback versus the euro weighed on returns for U.S. investors in European securities, for example, while a stronger yen boosted the returns of Japanese stocks in U.S. dollar terms.

During the period, investors faced worries about the U.S.-China trade dispute, Brexit, and a slowdown in global manufacturing. However, stocks were resilient, and the worst-case geopolitical scenarios failed to play out. Trade rhetoric has become more conciliatory and negotiators have made modest progress; the UK received another Brexit extension until January 31 to work out the terms of its departure from the European Union; and our economists believe that some manufacturing indicators, while still weak, appear poised for a recovery.

The actions by the Federal Reserve and other central banks to stimulate economic growth played a key role in sustaining market sentiment during the period. As evidence of slowing global growth began to mount, the Fed signaled early in the year that it would take steps to sustain the economic expansion, and central bank policymakers followed through with quarter-percentage-point rate cuts in July, September, and October and took steps to maintain liquidity in short-term lending markets.

The European Central Bank (ECB) also acted to address flagging growth. The ECB lowered its benchmark deposit rate deeper into negative territory and announced that it plans to buy €20 billion of bonds per month starting in November 2019 as it restarts its quantitative easing program.

Falling yields fueled a strong rally in the bond market and also aided equity results as companies benefited from lower borrowing costs and investors sought higher returns. Dividend-paying stocks in sectors such as real estate outperformed as investors searched for higher-income opportunities.

The yield on the 30-year Treasury bond hit a record low in August, falling below the 2% mark for the first time, and the benchmark 10-year Treasury note’s yield dipped to its lowest level since 2016. Despite being at or near record lows, Treasuries offered higher yields than bonds in many foreign markets, especially in Europe and Japan, where government bond yields were often in negative territory. (Bond prices and yields move in opposite directions.)

Looking ahead to 2020, we remain optimistic that the U.S. will avoid a recession in the new year, but we believe that further progress in U.S.-China trade talks will be a key factor in sustaining positive market sentiment. A reduction in trade barriers could help corporate earnings rebound and provide a lift to the manufacturing sector.

In the months ahead, our team of portfolio managers, analysts, and economists will be following the trade talks and the U.S. presidential elections, along with other developments that could affect market performance. Our teams in London and Hong Kong have provided us with important insights into Brexit and the protests in the Chinese territory over the past 12 months. We expect twists and turns along the way with each of these events, but we believe our approach to fundamental research around the globe will continue to add value in the year ahead.

Thank you for your continued confidence in T. Rowe Price.

Sincerely,


Robert Sharps
Group Chief Investment Officer

Management’s Discussion of Fund Performance

INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE

The fund seeks long-term growth of capital through investments primarily in the common stocks of companies located (or with primary operations) in the emerging market countries of Europe.

FUND COMMENTARY

How did the fund perform in the past 12 months?

The Emerging Europe Fund returned 18.08% in the 12-month period ended October 31, 2019. As shown in the Performance Comparison table, the fund underperformed the MSCI Emerging Markets Europe Index Net. (Performance for the I Class shares will vary due to a different fee structure. Past performance cannot guarantee future results.)


What factors influenced the fund’s performance?

On a country basis, stock selection in Russia was the single biggest drag on relative performance. This was primarily due to our position in Gazprom versus the benchmark. Although we ended the period with a near-benchmark weighting, we were not able to close the underweight quickly enough due to the fund concentration limit rules. (Please refer to the fund’s portfolio of investments for a complete list of holdings and the amount each represents in the portfolio.)

Shares in Mail.Ru weakened early in the review period on concerns about its substantial investments in new initiatives, such as food delivery and e-commerce. The shares came under pressure following news in July that Russia had introduced a draft law that proposed a 20% limit on foreign ownership of “significant” Russian information technology companies. However, this law has recently been withdrawn. We retain our view that Mail. Ru is well positioned to continue benefiting from the fast growth of online activity, especially targeted mobile advertising in Russia through its social networking platforms. We also believe that the company has great further potential for monetizing its new services, which include a location-based classified marketplace and the joint venture formed with Sberbank of Russia for food delivery and mobility.

The portfolio’s off-benchmark exposure to Georgia held back performance. The market as a whole sold off on the back of ongoing geopolitical tensions and concerns that these are leading to a worsened macro outlook. In early July, Russian airlines suspended flights to Georgia. However, we think the actual economic impact of this has been rather limited, and the relations with Russia are yet again improving. The Georgian market also sold off due to some depreciation in the Georgian lari, which we think was mostly driven by technical factors of the National Bank of Georgia’s de-dollarization policy. This is now being reversed, and in our view, the currency should stabilize from here. Our three holdings are Bank of Georgia, diversified holding company Georgia Capital, and Georgia Healthcare Group, all of which declined over the period.

Our underweight to Poland was the largest single contributor to relative returns, as this market significantly underperformed the benchmark index over the course of the portfolio’s fiscal year. In particular, Polish bank stocks came under considerable pressure as investors waited to see whether the sector would be punished by the European Court of Justice for selling Swiss franc-denominated mortgages between 2006 and 2008. In October 2019, the ruling went in favor of the Polish borrowers.

Stock selection in Hungary was among the main positives. Here, our off-benchmark position in Wizz Air Holdings was beneficial; the low-cost airline continues to perform well and noted in May 2019 that high fuel prices have been driving its weaker competitors out of the market, allowing Wizz to gain market share. Our avoidance of both MOL Hungarian Oil and Gas and Richter Gedeon was also beneficial as both stocks lost ground over the period.

Our stock selection in Turkey as well as our underweight to that market also contributed as the economy fell into recession over the period and the equity market significantly lagged the fund’s benchmark.

How is the fund positioned?

Russia is the dominant equity market in the emerging Europe region and the portfolio’s largest country allocation in absolute terms. We made a number of changes to our Russian oil and gas holdings over the 12-month period, resulting in the country weighting moving from a small underweight to an overweight. The biggest portfolio change was to build a near benchmark-weight position in Gazprom, having previously had no exposure to this benchmark heavyweight. (Restrictions on position concentration prevented us from buying a full index weighting in Gazprom.) The stock had a low valuation for a prolonged period. The catalyst for this decision was management’s announcement of a proposed significant full-year dividend hike, leading to a dividend yield of 10%. We believe that this is a positive direction for the company and that it represents a genuine change on the part of management. Going forward, we believe the need to pay dividends could help drive improved capital efficiency at Gazprom. We also established a new position in Tatneft OAO. The company has reduced its guidance on capital expenditures, and we believe it will increase its dividend by more than is generally expected.

We funded these purchases in part through reducing the size of our holdings in integrated energy company Rosneft and leading Russian natural gas producer Novatek PJSC. We believed the latter was looking expensive and that the company faces a headwind of low gas prices.

The portfolio retains an underweight in Turkey, however we did raise the size of our exposure over the last year. We believe the lira remains vulnerable, and the geopolitical situation of the country is challenging. We are closely monitoring whether the government sticks to the macroeconomic adjustment path and whether the central bank keeps monetary policy conditions sufficiently tight. Despite this difficult backdrop, we do see some pockets of opportunity within the country. Our holdings are composed of some selective high-quality names, particularly those that are beneficiaries of weakness in the lira. We initiated a position in automaker Tofas Turk Otomobil Fabrikasi on valuation grounds, following a substantial derating in the name. We believe the company’s margins stand to benefit from weakness in the Turkish currency. We continued to avoid exposure to Turkish financials as the banking sector asset quality remains under pressure.


Although we hold a large absolute position in Poland, we remain significantly underweight. The macroeconomic background there remains supportive, but valuations are unattractive relative to the rest of the emerging Europe asset class. We hold off-benchmark positions in several countries, including Kazakhstan, Romania, and Georgia.

What is portfolio management’s outlook?

We maintain a long-term investment horizon and exposure to well-managed companies that we believe can generate solid, superior earnings growth over time.

Energy-heavy Russia, the largest market in the index, has shown robust performance so far in 2019 despite the new U.S. sanctions that were put in place this year and last year. The price of oil has been a helpful factor, but economic growth in Russia has been fairly muted and is likely to remain so as the price of oil has not fed through into increased fixed investment and the government maintains a conservative fiscal policy. On the other hand, however, Russia has been running one of the tightest fiscal and monetary policies among the emerging markets and, hence, has become incredibly stable. We also think its currency, the ruble, is well supported here. The improving commitment of state companies to the government’s desired 50% payout ratio (the ratio of dividends to profits) has led to significant increases in dividends, and the Russian market is offering the highest dividend yield by far among the emerging markets. We feel the Russian market has further room to rerate as its cost of equity is coming down further with the Russian central bank’s rate cuts.

Turkey struggled at the beginning of 2019 as its currency weakness offset the upward move in the equity market and heightened geopolitical risks continue to be a headwind. More recently, the economy has begun to rebalance, which has seen the inflation rate come down rapidly and economic growth accelerate. However, the International Monetary Fund has questioned the sustainability of the country’s economic strategy without further reforms.

In central Europe, domestic demand remains strong, in our view, and real wages are growing. Poland continues to experience a strong macro backdrop, led by the consumer, but we think valuations are at a premium versus the region. This has meant that the choice of higher-quality names with reasonable valuations has been limited, in our view.

The views expressed reflect the opinions of T. Rowe Price as of the date of this report and are subject to change based on changes in market, economic, or other conditions. These views are not intended to be a forecast of future events and are no guarantee of future results.

RISKS OF INVESTING IN THE EMERGING EUROPE FUND

Stocks generally fluctuate in value more than bonds and may decline significantly over short time periods. There is a chance that stock prices overall will decline because stock markets tend to move in cycles, with periods of rising and falling prices. The value of a stock in which the fund invests may decline due to general weakness in the stock market or because of factors that affect a particular company or industry.

Investing in the securities of non-U.S. issuers involves special risks not typically associated with investing in U.S. issuers. International securities tend to be more volatile and less liquid than investments in U.S. securities and may lose value because of adverse local, political, social, or economic developments overseas or due to changes in the exchange rates between foreign currencies and the U.S. dollar. In addition, international investments are subject to settlement practices and regulatory and financial reporting standards that differ from those of the U.S.

The risks of international investing are heightened for securities of issuers in emerging market countries. Emerging market countries tend to have economic structures that are less diverse and mature and political systems that are less stable than those of developed countries. In addition to all of the risks of investing in international developed markets, emerging markets are more susceptible to governmental interference, local taxes being imposed on international investments, restrictions on gaining access to sales proceeds, and less liquid and less efficient trading markets. Frontier markets generally have smaller economies and less mature capital markets than emerging markets. As a result, the risks of investing in emerging market countries are magnified in frontier market countries.

Because the fund concentrates its investments in a particular geographic region, the fund’s performance is closely tied to the social, political, and economic conditions within that region. Political developments and changes in regulatory, tax, or economic policy in particular countries within the region could significantly affect the markets in those countries as well as the entire region. As a result, the fund is likely to be more volatile than more geographically diverse international funds.

These are some of the principal risks of investing in this fund. For a more thorough discussion of risks, please see the fund’s prospectus.

BENCHMARK INFORMATION

Note: MSCI makes no express or implied warranties or representations and shall have no liability whatsoever with respect to any MSCI data contained herein. The MSCI data may not be further redistributed or used as a basis for other indices or any securities or financial products. This report is not approved, reviewed, or produced by MSCI.


GROWTH OF $10,000

This chart shows the value of a hypothetical $10,000 investment in the fund over the past 10 fiscal year periods or since inception (for funds lacking 10-year records). The result is compared with benchmarks, which include a broad-based market index and may also include a peer group average or index. Market indexes do not include expenses, which are deducted from fund returns as well as mutual fund averages and indexes.

AVERAGE ANNUAL COMPOUND TOTAL RETURN

EXPENSE RATIO

FUND EXPENSE EXAMPLE

As a mutual fund shareholder, you may incur two types of costs: (1) transaction costs, such as redemption fees or sales loads, and (2) ongoing costs, including management fees, distribution and service (12b-1) fees, and other fund expenses. The following example is intended to help you understand your ongoing costs (in dollars) of investing in the fund and to compare these costs with the ongoing costs of investing in other mutual funds. The example is based on an investment of $1,000 invested at the beginning of the most recent six-month period and held for the entire period.

Please note that the fund has two share classes: The original share class (Investor Class) charges no distribution and service (12b-1) fee, and the I Class shares are also available to institutionally oriented clients and impose no 12b-1 or administrative fee payment. Each share class is presented separately in the table.

Actual Expenses
The first line of the following table (Actual) provides information about actual account values and expenses based on the fund’s actual returns. You may use the information on this line, together with your account balance, to estimate the expenses that you paid over the period. Simply divide your account value by $1,000 (for example, an $8,600 account value divided by $1,000 = 8.6), then multiply the result by the number on the first line under the heading “Expenses Paid During Period” to estimate the expenses you paid on your account during this period.

Hypothetical Example for Comparison Purposes
The information on the second line of the table (Hypothetical) is based on hypothetical account values and expenses derived from the fund’s actual expense ratio and an assumed 5% per year rate of return before expenses (not the fund’s actual return). You may compare the ongoing costs of investing in the fund with other funds by contrasting this 5% hypothetical example and the 5% hypothetical examples that appear in the shareholder reports of the other funds. The hypothetical account values and expenses may not be used to estimate the actual ending account balance or expenses you paid for the period.

Note: T. Rowe Price charges an annual account service fee of $20, generally for accounts with less than $10,000. The fee is waived for any investor whose T. Rowe Price mutual fund accounts total $50,000 or more; accounts electing to receive electronic delivery of account statements, transaction confirmations, prospectuses, and shareholder reports; or accounts of an investor who is a T. Rowe Price Personal Services or Enhanced Personal Services client (enrollment in these programs generally requires T. Rowe Price assets of at least $250,000). This fee is not included in the accompanying table. If you are subject to the fee, keep it in mind when you are estimating the ongoing expenses of investing in the fund and when comparing the expenses of this fund with other funds.

You should also be aware that the expenses shown in the table highlight only your ongoing costs and do not reflect any transaction costs, such as redemption fees or sales loads. Therefore, the second line of the table is useful in comparing ongoing costs only and will not help you determine the relative total costs of owning different funds. To the extent a fund charges transaction costs, however, the total cost of owning that fund is higher.

QUARTER-END RETURNS



The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.



The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.







The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.



The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

T. Rowe Price International Funds, Inc. (the corporation) is registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (the 1940 Act). The Emerging Europe Fund (the fund) is a nondiversified, open-end management investment company established by the corporation. The fund seeks long-term growth of capital through investments primarily in the common stocks of companies located (or with primary operations) in the emerging market countries of Europe. The fund has two classes of shares: the Emerging Europe Fund (Investor Class) and the Emerging Europe Fund–I Class (I Class). I Class shares require a $1 million initial investment minimum, although the minimum generally is waived for retirement plans, financial intermediaries, and certain other accounts. Each class has exclusive voting rights on matters related solely to that class; separate voting rights on matters that relate to both classes; and, in all other respects, the same rights and obligations as the other class.

NOTE 1 - SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Basis of Preparation The fund is an investment company and follows accounting and reporting guidance in the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Accounting Standards Codification Topic 946 (ASC 946). The accompanying financial statements were prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (GAAP), including, but not limited to, ASC 946. GAAP requires the use of estimates made by management. Management believes that estimates and valuations are appropriate; however, actual results may differ from those estimates, and the valuations reflected in the accompanying financial statements may differ from the value ultimately realized upon sale or maturity. Certain prior year amounts in the accompanying financial statements and financial highlights have been restated to conform to current year presentation.

Investment Transactions, Investment Income, and Distributions Investment transactions are accounted for on the trade date basis. Income and expenses are recorded on the accrual basis. Realized gains and losses are reported on the identified cost basis. Income tax-related interest and penalties, if incurred, are recorded as income tax expense. Dividends received from mutual fund investments are reflected as dividend income; capital gain distributions are reflected as realized gain/loss. Dividend income and capital gain distributions are recorded on the ex-dividend date. Non-cash dividends, if any, are recorded at the fair market value of the asset received. Distributions to shareholders are recorded on the ex-dividend date. Income distributions, if any, are declared and paid by each class annually. A capital gain distribution may also be declared and paid by the fund annually.

Currency Translation Assets, including investments, and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are translated into U.S. dollar values each day at the prevailing exchange rate, using the mean of the bid and asked prices of such currencies against U.S. dollars as quoted by a major bank. Purchases and sales of securities, income, and expenses are translated into U.S. dollars at the prevailing exchange rate on the respective date of such transaction. The effect of changes in foreign currency exchange rates on realized and unrealized security gains and losses is not bifurcated from the portion attributable to changes in market prices.

Class Accounting Shareholder servicing, prospectus, and shareholder report expenses incurred by each class are charged directly to the class to which they relate. Expenses common to both classes, investment income, and realized and unrealized gains and losses are allocated to the classes based upon the relative daily net assets of each class.

Redemption Fees Prior to April 1, 2019, a 2% fee was assessed on redemptions of fund shares held for 90 days or less to deter short-term trading and to protect the interests of long-term shareholders. Redemption fees were withheld from proceeds that shareholders received from the sale or exchange of fund shares. The fees were paid to the fund and were recorded as an increase to paid-in capital. The fees may have caused the redemption price per share to differ from the net asset value per share.

New Accounting Guidance In March 2017, the FASB issued amended guidance to shorten the amortization period for certain callable debt securities held at a premium. The guidance is effective for fiscal years and interim periods beginning after December 15, 2018. Adoption will have no effect on the fund’s net assets or results of operations.

Indemnification In the normal course of business, the fund may provide indemnification in connection with its officers and directors, service providers, and/or private company investments. The fund’s maximum exposure under these arrangements is unknown; however, the risk of material loss is currently considered to be remote.

NOTE 2 - VALUATION

The fund’s financial instruments are valued and each class’s net asset value (NAV) per share is computed at the close of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), normally 4 p.m. ET, each day the NYSE is open for business. However, the NAV per share may be calculated at a time other than the normal close of the NYSE if trading on the NYSE is restricted, if the NYSE closes earlier, or as may be permitted by the SEC.

Fair Value The fund’s financial instruments are reported at fair value, which GAAP defines as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. The T. Rowe Price Valuation Committee (the Valuation Committee) is an internal committee that has been delegated certain responsibilities by the fund’s Board of Directors (the Board) to ensure that financial instruments are appropriately priced at fair value in accordance with GAAP and the 1940 Act. Subject to oversight by the Board, the Valuation Committee develops and oversees pricing-related policies and procedures and approves all fair value determinations. Specifically, the Valuation Committee establishes procedures to value securities; determines pricing techniques, sources, and persons eligible to effect fair value pricing actions; oversees the selection, services, and performance of pricing vendors; oversees valuation-related business continuity practices; and provides guidance on internal controls and valuation-related matters. The Valuation Committee reports to the Board and has representation from legal, portfolio management and trading, operations, risk management, and the fund’s treasurer.

Various valuation techniques and inputs are used to determine the fair value of financial instruments. GAAP establishes the following fair value hierarchy that categorizes the inputs used to measure fair value:

Level 1 – quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical financial instruments that the fund can access at the reporting date

Level 2 – inputs other than Level 1 quoted prices that are observable, either directly or indirectly (including, but not limited to, quoted prices for similar financial instruments in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar financial instruments in inactive markets, interest rates and yield curves, implied volatilities, and credit spreads)

Level 3 – unobservable inputs

Observable inputs are developed using market data, such as publicly available information about actual events or transactions, and reflect the assumptions that market participants would use to price the financial instrument. Unobservable inputs are those for which market data are not available and are developed using the best information available about the assumptions that market participants would use to price the financial instrument. GAAP requires valuation techniques to maximize the use of relevant observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs. When multiple inputs are used to derive fair value, the financial instrument is assigned to the level within the fair value hierarchy based on the lowest-level input that is significant to the fair value of the financial instrument. Input levels are not necessarily an indication of the risk or liquidity associated with financial instruments at that level but rather the degree of judgment used in determining those values.

Valuation Techniques Equity securities listed or regularly traded on a securities exchange or in the over-the-counter (OTC) market are valued at the last quoted sale price or, for certain markets, the official closing price at the time the valuations are made. OTC Bulletin Board securities are valued at the mean of the closing bid and asked prices. A security that is listed or traded on more than one exchange is valued at the quotation on the exchange determined to be the primary market for such security. Listed securities not traded on a particular day are valued at the mean of the closing bid and asked prices for domestic securities and the last quoted sale or closing price for international securities.

For valuation purposes, the last quoted prices of non-U.S. equity securities may be adjusted to reflect the fair value of such securities at the close of the NYSE. If the fund determines that developments between the close of a foreign market and the close of the NYSE will affect the value of some or all of its portfolio securities, the fund will adjust the previous quoted prices to reflect what it believes to be the fair value of the securities as of the close of the NYSE. In deciding whether it is necessary to adjust quoted prices to reflect fair value, the fund reviews a variety of factors, including developments in foreign markets, the performance of U.S. securities markets, and the performance of instruments trading in U.S. markets that represent foreign securities and baskets of foreign securities. The fund may also fair value securities in other situations, such as when a particular foreign market is closed but the fund is open. The fund uses outside pricing services to provide it with quoted prices and information to evaluate or adjust those prices. The fund cannot predict how often it will use quoted prices and how often it will determine it necessary to adjust those prices to reflect fair value. As a means of evaluating its security valuation process, the fund routinely compares quoted prices, the next day’s opening prices in the same markets, and adjusted prices.

Actively traded equity securities listed on a domestic exchange generally are categorized in Level 1 of the fair value hierarchy. Non-U.S. equity securities generally are categorized in Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy despite the availability of quoted prices because, as described above, the fund evaluates and determines whether those quoted prices reflect fair value at the close of the NYSE or require adjustment. OTC Bulletin Board securities, certain preferred securities, and equity securities traded in inactive markets generally are categorized in Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy.

Investments in mutual funds are valued at the mutual fund’s closing NAV per share on the day of valuation and are categorized in Level 1 of the fair value hierarchy. Assets and liabilities other than financial instruments, including short-term receivables and payables, are carried at cost, or estimated realizable value, if less, which approximates fair value.

Thinly traded financial instruments and those for which the above valuation procedures are inappropriate or are deemed not to reflect fair value are stated at fair value as determined in good faith by the Valuation Committee. The objective of any fair value pricing determination is to arrive at a price that could reasonably be expected from a current sale. Financial instruments fair valued by the Valuation Committee are primarily private placements, restricted securities, warrants, rights, and other securities that are not publicly traded.

Subject to oversight by the Board, the Valuation Committee regularly makes good faith judgments to establish and adjust the fair valuations of certain securities as events occur and circumstances warrant. For instance, in determining the fair value of an equity investment with limited market activity, such as a private placement or a thinly traded public company stock, the Valuation Committee considers a variety of factors, which may include, but are not limited to, the issuer’s business prospects, its financial standing and performance, recent investment transactions in the issuer, new rounds of financing, negotiated transactions of significant size between other investors in the company, relevant market valuations of peer companies, strategic events affecting the company, market liquidity for the issuer, and general economic conditions and events. In consultation with the investment and pricing teams, the Valuation Committee will determine an appropriate valuation technique based on available information, which may include both observable and unobservable inputs. The Valuation Committee typically will afford greatest weight to actual prices in arm’s length transactions, to the extent they represent orderly transactions between market participants, transaction information can be reliably obtained, and prices are deemed representative of fair value. However, the Valuation Committee may also consider other valuation methods such as market-based valuation multiples; a discount or premium from market value of a similar, freely traded security of the same issuer; or some combination. Fair value determinations are reviewed on a regular basis and updated as information becomes available, including actual purchase and sale transactions of the issue. Because any fair value determination involves a significant amount of judgment, there is a degree of subjectivity inherent in such pricing decisions, and fair value prices determined by the Valuation Committee could differ from those of other market participants. Depending on the relative significance of unobservable inputs, including the valuation technique(s) used, fair valued securities may be categorized in Level 2 or 3 of the fair value hierarchy.

Valuation Inputs The following table summarizes the fund’s financial instruments, based on the inputs used to determine their fair values on October 31, 2019 (for further detail by category, please refer to the accompanying Portfolio of Investments):

Following is a reconciliation of the fund’s Level 3 holdings for the year ended October 31, 2019. Gain (loss) reflects both realized and change in unrealized gain/loss on Level 3 holdings during the period, if any, and is included on the accompanying Statement of Operations. The change in unrealized gain/loss on Level 3 instruments held at October 31, 2019, totaled $(445,000) for the year ended October 31, 2019.

NOTE 3 - OTHER INVESTMENT TRANSACTIONS

Consistent with its investment objective, the fund engages in the following practices to manage exposure to certain risks and/or to enhance performance. The investment objective, policies, program, and risk factors of the fund are described more fully in the fund’s prospectus and Statement of Additional Information.

Emerging and Frontier Markets The fund may invest, either directly or through investments in other T. Rowe Price funds, in securities of companies located in, issued by governments of, or denominated in or linked to the currencies of emerging and frontier market countries. Emerging markets, and to a greater extent frontier markets, generally have economic structures that are less diverse and mature, and political systems that are less stable, than developed countries. These markets may be subject to greater political, economic, and social uncertainty and differing regulatory environments that may potentially impact the fund’s ability to buy or sell certain securities or repatriate proceeds to U.S. dollars. Such securities are often subject to greater price volatility, less liquidity, and higher rates of inflation than U.S. securities. Investing in frontier markets is significantly riskier than investing in other countries, including emerging markets.

In response to political and military actions undertaken by Russia, the U.S., European Union, and other jurisdictions have instituted various sanctions against Russia. These sanctions and additional sanctions, if issued, could have adverse consequences for the Russian economy, including a weakening or devaluation of the ruble, a downgrade in the country’s credit rating, and a significant decline in the value and liquidity of securities issued by Russian companies or the Russian government. Sanctions could impair a fund’s ability to invest in accordance with its investment program, to determine the overall value of its net assets, and to sell holdings as needed to meet shareholder redemptions. At October 31, 2019, approximately 68% of the fund’s net assets were invested in Russian securities; on that date, none of the fund’s investments were in securities issued by entities subject to sanctions.

Restricted Securities The fund may invest in securities that are subject to legal or contractual restrictions on resale. Prompt sale of such securities at an acceptable price may be difficult and may involve substantial delays and additional costs.

Securities Lending The fund may lend its securities to approved borrowers to earn additional income. Its securities lending activities are administered by a lending agent in accordance with a securities lending agreement. Security loans generally do not have stated maturity dates, and the fund may recall a security at any time. The fund receives collateral in the form of cash or U.S. government securities. Collateral is maintained over the life of the loan in an amount not less than the value of loaned securities; any additional collateral required due to changes in security values is delivered to the fund the next business day. Cash collateral is invested in accordance with investment guidelines approved by fund management. Additionally, the lending agent indemnifies the fund against losses resulting from borrower default. Although risk is mitigated by the collateral and indemnification, the fund could experience a delay in recovering its securities and a possible loss of income or value if the borrower fails to return the securities, collateral investments decline in value, and the lending agent fails to perform. Securities lending revenue consists of earnings on invested collateral and borrowing fees, net of any rebates to the borrower, compensation to the lending agent, and other administrative costs. In accordance with GAAP, investments made with cash collateral are reflected in the accompanying financial statements, but collateral received in the form of securities is not. At October 31, 2019, the value of loaned securities was $758,000; the value of cash collateral and related investments was $796,000.

Depositary Receipts The fund may invest in American Depositary Receipts (ADRs), Global Depositary Receipts (GDRs), and other depositary receipts, which are certificates issued by U.S. and international institutions, such as a bank or trust company, that represent ownership of foreign securities held by the issuing institution. Depositary receipts are transferable, trade on established markets, and entitle the holder to all dividends paid by the underlying foreign security. Issuing institutions generally charge a security administration fee.

Other Purchases and sales of portfolio securities other than short-term securities aggregated $56,528,000 and $71,843,000, respectively, for the year ended October 31, 2019.

NOTE 4 - FEDERAL INCOME TAXES

No provision for federal income taxes is required since the fund intends to continue to qualify as a regulated investment company under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code and distribute to shareholders all of its taxable income and gains. Distributions determined in accordance with federal income tax regulations may differ in amount or character from net investment income and realized gains for financial reporting purposes.

The fund files U.S. federal, state, and local tax returns as required. The fund’s tax returns are subject to examination by the relevant tax authorities until expiration of the applicable statute of limitations, which is generally three years after the filing of the tax return but which can be extended to six years in certain circumstances. Tax returns for open years have incorporated no uncertain tax positions that require a provision for income taxes.

Financial reporting records are adjusted for permanent book/tax differences to reflect tax character but are not adjusted for temporary differences.

Distributions during the years ended October 31, 2019 and October 31, 2018, totaled $4,535,000 and $2,635,000, respectively, and were characterized as ordinary income for tax purposes. At October 31, 2019, the tax-basis cost of investments and components of net assets were as follows:

The difference between book-basis and tax-basis net unrealized appreciation (depreciation) is attributable to the realization of gains/losses on passive foreign investment companies for tax purposes. The fund intends to retain realized gains to the extent of available capital loss carryforwards. Net realized capital losses may be carried forward indefinitely to offset future realized capital gains. During the year ended October 31, 2019, the fund utilized $3,316,000 of capital loss carryforwards.

NOTE 5 - FOREIGN TAXES

The fund is subject to foreign income taxes imposed by certain countries in which it invests. Additionally, capital gains realized upon disposition of securities issued in or by certain foreign countries are subject to capital gains tax imposed by those countries. All taxes are computed in accordance with the applicable foreign tax law, and, to the extent permitted, capital losses are used to offset capital gains. Taxes attributable to income are accrued by the fund as a reduction of income. Current and deferred tax expense attributable to capital gains is reflected as a component of realized or change in unrealized gain/loss on securities in the accompanying financial statements. To the extent that the fund has country specific capital loss carryforwards, such carryforwards are applied against net unrealized gains when determining the deferred tax liability. Any deferred tax liability incurred by the fund is included in either Other liabilities or Deferred tax liability on the accompanying Statement of Assets and Liabilities.

NOTE 6 - RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

The fund is managed by T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc. (Price Associates), a wholly owned subsidiary of T. Rowe Price Group, Inc. (Price Group). Price Associates has entered into a sub-advisory agreement(s) with one or more of its wholly owned subsidiaries, to provide investment advisory services to the fund. The investment management agreement between the fund and Price Associates provides for an annual investment management fee, which is computed daily and paid monthly. The fee consists of an individual fund fee, equal to 0.75% of the fund’s average daily net assets, and a group fee. The group fee rate is calculated based on the combined net assets of certain mutual funds sponsored by Price Associates (the group) applied to a graduated fee schedule, with rates ranging from 0.48% for the first $1 billion of assets to 0.265% for assets in excess of $650 billion. The fund’s group fee is determined by applying the group fee rate to the fund’s average daily net assets. At October 31, 2019, the effective annual group fee rate was 0.29%.

Effective October 1, 2019, Investor Class is subject to a contractual expense limitation through the expense limitation date indicated in the table below. During the limitation period, Price Associates is required to waive its management fee or pay any expenses (excluding interest; expenses related to borrowings, taxes, and brokerage; and other non-recurring expenses permitted by the investment management agreement) that would otherwise cause the class’s ratio of annualized total expenses to average net assets (net expense ratio) to exceed its expense limitation. The class is required to repay Price Associates for expenses previously waived/paid to the extent the class’s net assets grow or expenses decline sufficiently to allow repayment without causing the class’s net expense ratio (after the repayment is taken into account) to exceed the lesser of: (1) the expense limitation in place at the time such amounts were waived; or (2) the class’s current expense limitation. However, no repayment will be made more than three years after the date of a payment or waiver.

The I Class is also subject to an operating expense limitation (I Class Limit) pursuant to which Price Associates is contractually required to pay all operating expenses of the I Class, excluding management fees; interest; expenses related to borrowings, taxes, and brokerage; and other non-recurring expenses permitted by the investment management agreement, to the extent such operating expenses, on an annualized basis, exceed the I Class Limit. This agreement will continue through the expense limitation date indicated in the table below, and may be renewed, revised, or revoked only with approval of the fund’s Board. The I Class is required to repay Price Associates for expenses previously paid to the extent the class’s net assets grow or expenses decline sufficiently to allow repayment without causing the class’s operating expenses (after the repayment is taken into account) to exceed the lesser of: (1) the I Class Limit in place at the time such amounts were paid; or (2) the current I Class Limit. However, no repayment will be made more than three years after the date of a payment or waiver.

Pursuant to these agreements, expenses were waived/paid by and/or repaid to Price Associates during the year ended October 31, 2019 as indicated in the table below. Including these amounts, expenses previously waived/paid by Price Associates in the amount of $13,000 remain subject to repayment by the fund at October 31, 2019. Any repayment of expenses previously waived/paid by Price Associates during the period would be included in the net investment income and expense ratios presented on the accompanying Financial Highlights.

In addition, the fund has entered into service agreements with Price Associates and two wholly owned subsidiaries of Price Associates, each an affiliate of the fund (collectively, Price). Price Associates provides certain accounting and administrative services to the fund. T. Rowe Price Services, Inc. provides shareholder and administrative services in its capacity as the fund’s transfer and dividend-disbursing agent. T. Rowe Price Retirement Plan Services, Inc. provides subaccounting and recordkeeping services for certain retirement accounts invested in the Investor Class. For the year ended October 31, 2019, expenses incurred pursuant to these service agreements were $70,000 for Price Associates; $310,000 for T. Rowe Price Services, Inc.; and $8,000 for T. Rowe Price Retirement Plan Services, Inc. All amounts due to and due from Price, exclusive of investment management fees payable, are presented net on the accompanying Statement of Assets and Liabilities.

The fund is also one of several mutual funds sponsored by Price Associates (underlying Price Funds) in which the T. Rowe Price Spectrum Funds (Spectrum Funds) may invest. The Spectrum Funds do not invest in the underlying Price Funds for the purpose of exercising management or control. Pursuant to special servicing agreements, expenses associated with the operation of the Spectrum Funds are borne by each underlying Price Fund to the extent of estimated savings to it and in proportion to the average daily value of its shares owned by the Spectrum Funds. Expenses allocated under these special servicing agreements are reflected as shareholder servicing expense in the accompanying financial statements. For the year ended October 31, 2019, the fund was allocated $5,000 of Spectrum Funds’ expenses. Of these amounts, $3,000 related to services provided by Price. All amounts due to and due from Price, exclusive of investment management fees payable, are presented net on the accompanying Statement of Assets and Liabilities. Additionally, redemption fees received by the Spectrum Funds are allocated to each underlying Price Fund in proportion to the average daily value of its shares owned by the Spectrum Funds. Less than $1,000 of redemption fees reflected in the accompanying financial statements were received from the Spectrum Funds. At October 31, 2019, approximately 7% of the outstanding shares of the Investor Class were held by the Spectrum Funds.

The fund may invest its cash reserves in certain open-end management investment companies managed by Price Associates and considered affiliates of the fund: the T. Rowe Price Government Reserve Fund or the T. Rowe Price Treasury Reserve Fund, organized as money market funds, or the T. Rowe Price Short-Term Fund, a short-term bond fund (collectively, the Price Reserve Funds). The Price Reserve Funds are offered as short-term investment options to mutual funds, trusts, and other accounts managed by Price Associates or its affiliates and are not available for direct purchase by members of the public. Cash collateral from securities lending is invested in the T. Rowe Price Short-Term Fund. The Price Reserve Funds pay no investment management fees.

As of October 31, 2019, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., or its wholly owned subsidiaries owned 18,911 shares of the I Class, representing 5% of the I Class’s net assets

The fund may participate in securities purchase and sale transactions with other funds or accounts advised by Price Associates (cross trades), in accordance with procedures adopted by the fund’s Board and Securities and Exchange Commission rules, which require, among other things, that such purchase and sale cross trades be effected at the independent current market price of the security. During the year ended October 31, 2019, the fund had no purchases or sales cross trades with other funds or accounts advised by Price Associates.

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

To the Board of Directors of T. Rowe Price International Funds, Inc. and
Shareholders of T. Rowe Price Emerging Europe Fund

Opinion on the Financial Statements
We have audited the accompanying statement of assets and liabilities, including the portfolio of investments, of T. Rowe Price Emerging Europe Fund (one of the funds constituting T. Rowe Price International Funds, Inc., hereafter referred to as the “Fund”) as of October 31, 2019, the related statement of operations for the year ended October 31, 2019, the statement of changes in net assets for each of the two years in the period ended October 31, 2019, including the related notes, and the financial highlights for each of the periods indicated therein (collectively referred to as the “financial statements”). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Fund as of October 31, 2019, the results of its operations for the year then ended, the changes in its net assets for each of the two years in the period ended October 31, 2019 and the financial highlights for each of the periods indicated therein, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

Basis for Opinion
These financial statements are the responsibility of the Fund’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Fund’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Fund in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

We conducted our audits of these financial statements in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud.

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. Our procedures included confirmation of securities owned as of October 31, 2019 by correspondence with the custodian, transfer agent and brokers; when replies were not received from brokers, we performed other auditing procedures. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
Baltimore, Maryland
December 17, 2019

We have served as the auditor of one or more investment companies in the T. Rowe Price group of investment companies since 1973.

TAX INFORMATION (UNAUDITED) FOR THE TAX YEAR ENDED 10/31/19

We are providing this information as required by the Internal Revenue Code. The amounts shown may differ from those elsewhere in this report because of differences between tax and financial reporting requirements.

For taxable non-corporate shareholders, $6,011,000 of the fund’s income represents qualified dividend income subject to a long-term capital gains tax rate of not greater than 20%.

The fund will pass through foreign source income of $5,784,000 and foreign taxes paid of $743,000.

INFORMATION ON PROXY VOTING POLICIES, PROCEDURES, AND RECORDS

A description of the policies and procedures used by T. Rowe Price funds and portfolios to determine how to vote proxies relating to portfolio securities is available in each fund’s Statement of Additional Information. You may request this document by calling 1-800-225-5132 or by accessing the SEC’s website, sec.gov.

The description of our proxy voting policies and procedures is also available on our corporate website. To access it, please visit the following Web page:

https://www.troweprice.com/corporate/en/utility/policies.html

Scroll down to the section near the bottom of the page that says, “Proxy Voting Policies.” Click on the Proxy Voting Policies link in the shaded box.

Each fund’s most recent annual proxy voting record is available on our website and through the SEC’s website. To access it through T. Rowe Price, visit the website location shown above, and scroll down to the section near the bottom of the page that says, “Proxy Voting Records.” Click on the Proxy Voting Records link in the shaded box.

HOW TO OBTAIN QUARTERLY PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS

Effective for reporting periods on or after March 1, 2019, a fund, except a money market fund, files a complete schedule of portfolio holdings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) for the first and third quarters of each fiscal year as an exhibit to its reports on Form N-PORT. Prior to March 1, 2019, a fund, including a money market fund, filed a complete schedule of portfolio holdings with the SEC for the first and third quarters of each fiscal year on Form N-Q. A money market fund files detailed month-end portfolio holdings information on Form N-MFP with the SEC each month and posts a complete schedule of portfolio holdings on its website (troweprice.com) as of each month-end for the previous six months. A fund’s Forms N-PORT, N-MFP, and N-Q are available electronically on the SEC’s website (sec.gov).

ABOUT THE FUND’S DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS

Your fund is overseen by a Board of Directors (Board) that meets regularly to review a wide variety of matters affecting or potentially affecting the fund, including performance, investment programs, compliance matters, advisory fees and expenses, service providers, and business and regulatory affairs. The Board elects the fund’s officers, who are listed in the final table. At least 75% of the Board’s members are independent of the Boards of T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc. (T. Rowe Price), and its affiliates; “inside” or “interested” directors are employees or officers of T. Rowe Price. The business address of each director and officer is 100 East Pratt Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21202. The Statement of Additional Information includes additional information about the fund directors and is available without charge by calling a T. Rowe Price representative at 1-800-638-5660.

INDEPENDENT DIRECTORS(a)
 
Name
(Year of Birth)
Year Elected
[Number of T. Rowe Price
Portfolios Overseen]
      Principal Occupation(s) and Directorships of Public Companies and Other Investment Companies During the Past Five Years
 
Teresa Bryce Bazemore
(1959)
2018
[188]
President, Radian Guaranty (2008 to 2017); Chief Executive Officer, Bazemore Consulting LLC (2018 to present); Director, Chimera Investment Corporation (2017 to present); Director, Federal Home Loan Bank of Pittsburgh (2017 to present)
 
Ronald J. Daniels
(1959)
2018
[188]
President, The Johns Hopkins University(b) and Professor, Political Science Department, The Johns Hopkins University (2009 to present); Director, Lyndhurst Holdings (2015 to present)
 
Bruce W. Duncan
(1951)
2013
[188]
Chief Executive Officer and Director (January 2009 to December 2016), Chairman of the Board (January 2016 to present), and President (January 2009 to September 2016), First Industrial Realty Trust, an owner and operator of industrial properties; Chairman of the Board (2005 to September 2016) and Director (1999 to September 2016), Starwood Hotels & Resorts, a hotel and leisure company; Member, Investment Company Institute Board of Governors (2017 to present); Member, Independent Directors Council Governing Board (2017 to present); Senior Advisor, KKR (November 2018 to present); Director, Boston Properties (May 2016 to present); Director, Marriott International, Inc. (September 2016 to present)
 
Robert J. Gerrard, Jr.
(1952)
2012
[188]
Advisory Board Member, Pipeline Crisis/Winning Strategies, a collaborative working to improve opportunities for young African Americans (1997 to 2016); Chairman of the Board, all funds (July 2018 to present)
 
Paul F. McBride
(1956)
2013
[188]
Advisory Board Member, Vizzia Technologies (2015 to present); Board Member, Dunbar Armored (2012 to 2018)
 
Cecilia E. Rouse, Ph.D.
(1963)
2012
[188]
Dean, Woodrow Wilson School (2012 to present); Professor and Researcher, Princeton University (1992 to present); Director, MDRC, a nonprofit education and social policy research organization (2011 to present); Member, National Academy of Education (2010 to present); Research Associate of Labor Studies Program at the National Bureau of Economic Research (2011 to 2015); Board Member, National Bureau of Economic Research (2011 to present); Chair of Committee on the Status of Minority Groups in the Economic Profession of the American Economic Association (2012 to 2018); Vice President (2015 to 2016), Board Member, American Economic Association (2018 to present)
 
John G. Schreiber
(1946)
2001
[188]
Owner/President, Centaur Capital Partners, Inc., a real estate investment company (1991 to present); Cofounder, Partner, and Cochairman of the Investment Committee, Blackstone Real Estate Advisors, L.P. (1992 to 2015); Director, Blackstone Mortgage Trust, a real estate finance company (2012 to 2016); Director and Chairman of the Board, Brixmor Property Group, Inc. (2013 to present); Director, Hilton Worldwide (2007 to present); Director, Hudson Pacific Properties (2014 to 2016); Director, Invitation Homes (2014 to 2017); Director, JMB Realty Corporation (1980 to present)
 
Mark R. Tercek(c)
(1957)
2009
[0]
President and Chief Executive Officer, The Nature Conservancy (2008 to present)
 
(a) All information about the independent directors was current as of February 19, 2019, unless otherwise indicated, except for the number of portfolios overseen, which is current as of the date of this report.
(b) William J. Stromberg, president and chief executive officer of T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., the parent company of the Price Funds’ investment advisor, has served on the Board of Trustees of Johns Hopkins University since 2014 and is a member of the Johns Hopkins University Board’s Compensation Committee.
(c) Effective February 15, 2019, Mr. Tercek resigned from his role as independent director of the Price Funds.
 
INSIDE DIRECTORS
 
Name
(Year of Birth)
Year Elected*
[Number of T. Rowe Price
Portfolios Overseen]
      Principal Occupation(s) and Directorships of Public Companies and Other Investment Companies During the Past Five Years
 
David Oestreicher
(1967)
2018
[188]
Chief Legal Officer, Vice President, and Secretary, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.; Director, Vice President, and Secretary, T. Rowe Price Investment Services, Inc., T. Rowe Price Retirement Plan Services, Inc., T. Rowe Price Services, Inc., and T. Rowe Price Trust Company; Vice President and Secretary, T. Rowe Price, T. Rowe Price Hong Kong (Price Hong Kong), and T. Rowe Price International; Vice President, T. Rowe Price Japan (Price Japan) and T. Rowe Price Singapore (Price Singapore); Principal Executive Officer and Executive Vice President, all funds
 
Robert W. Sharps, CFA,
CPA**
(1971)
2017
[188]
Director and Vice President, T. Rowe Price; Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price Trust Company; Vice President, International Funds
 
*Each inside director serves until retirement, resignation, or election of a successor.
**Mr. Sharps replaced Edward A. Wiese as director of the domestic fixed income Price Funds effective January 1, 2019.
 
OFFICERS
 
Name (Year of Birth)      
Position Held With International Funds Principal Occupation(s)
 
Mariel Abreu (1981)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
  
Jason R. Adams (1979)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.; formerly, Research Analyst, Caxton Associates (to 2015)
 
Ulle Adamson, CFA (1979)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Roy H. Adkins (1970)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Christopher D. Alderson (1962)
President
Director and Vice President, T. Rowe Price International; Vice President, Price Hong Kong, Price Singapore, and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
  
Syed H. Ali (1970)
Vice President
Vice President, Price Singapore and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Kennard W. Allen (1977)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Paulina Amieva (1981)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Malik S. Asif (1981)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Ziad Bakri, M.D., CFA (1980)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Harishankar Balkrishna (1983)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Sheena L. Barbosa (1983)
Vice President
Vice President, Price Hong Kong and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Peter J. Bates, CFA (1974)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Jason Bauer (1979)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Luis M. Baylac (1982)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Timothy Bei (1973)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Oliver D.M. Bell (1969)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
R. Scott Berg, CFA (1972)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price Trust Company
 
Steven E. Boothe, CFA (1977)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Peter I. Botoucharov (1965)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Tala Boulos (1984)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Darrell N. Braman (1963)
Vice President and Secretary
Vice President, Price Hong Kong, Price Singapore, T. Rowe Price, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., T. Rowe Price International, T. Rowe Price Retirement Plan Services, Inc., and T. Rowe Price Services, Inc.
 
Christopher P. Brown, Jr., CFA (1977)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Sheldon Chan (1981)
Vice President
Vice President, Price Hong Kong and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Andrew Chang (1983)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
William Chen (1979)
Vice President
Vice President, Price Hong Kong; formerly, Greater China TMT and Automation Analyst, J.P. Morgan Asset Management (to 2018)
 
Carolyn Hoi Che Chu (1974)
Vice President
Vice President, Price Hong Kong and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Archibald Ciganer Albeniz, CFA (1976)
Executive Vice President
Director and Vice President, Price Japan; Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Richard N. Clattenburg, CFA (1979)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, Price Singapore, T. Rowe Price, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Michael J. Conelius, CFA (1964)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., T. Rowe Price International, and T. Rowe Price Trust Company
 
Michael F. Connelly, CFA (1977)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Andrew S. Davis (1978)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Richard de los Reyes (1975)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price Trust Company
 
Michael Della Vedova (1969)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Maria Elena Drew (1973)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International; formerly, Executive Director, Goldman Sachs Asset Management (to 2017)
 
Shawn T. Driscoll (1975)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price Trust Company
   
Alan S. Dupski, CPA (1982)
Assistant Treasurer
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Bridget A. Ebner (1970)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
David J. Eiswert, CFA (1972)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
   
Dawei Feng (1979)
Vice President
Vice President, Price Hong Kong and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.; formerly, Head of China Consumer in Equity Research, Credit Lyonnais Asia-Pacific (to 2018)
 
Ryan W. Ferro (1985)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Mark S. Finn, CFA, CPA (1963)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price Trust Company
 
Quentin S. Fitzsimmons (1968)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International; formerly, Portfolio Manager, Royal Bank of Scotland Group (to 2015)
 
Melissa C. Gallagher (1974)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Justin T. Gerbereux, CFA (1975)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price Trust Company
 
Aaron Gifford, CFA (1987)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.; formerly, Strategist, Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC (to 2017)
 
John R. Gilner (1961)
Chief Compliance Officer
Chief Compliance Officer and Vice President, T. Rowe Price; Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price Investment Services, Inc.
 
Vishnu V. Gopal (1979)
Vice President
Vice President, Price Hong Kong and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Joel Grant (1978)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Gary J. Greb (1961)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price, T. Rowe Price International, and T. Rowe Price Trust Company
 
Paul D. Greene II (1978)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Benjamin Griffiths, CFA (1977)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Gianluca Guicciardi (1983)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Richard L. Hall (1979)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Nabil Hanano, CFA (1984)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Daniel Hirsch, CFA (1985)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price
 
Jeffrey Holford, Ph.D., ACA (1972)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.; formerly, Managing Director, Jeffries Financial Group (to 2018)
 
Stefan Hubrich, Ph.D., CFA (1974)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Arif Husain, CFA (1972)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Hiromasa Ikeda (1971)
Vice President
Vice President, Price Hong Kong and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Tetsuji Inoue (1971)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Michael Jacobs (1971)
Vice President
Vice President, Price Japan, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Randal S. Jenneke (1971)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Prashant G. Jeyaganesh (1983)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Nina P. Jones, CPA (1980)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Yoichiro Kai (1973)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Jacob Kann, CFA (1987)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Andrew J. Keirle (1974)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Takanori Kobayashi (1981)
Vice President
Vice President, Price Japan, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International; formerly, Research Analyst, Allianz Global Investors (to 2017)
   
Paul J. Krug, CPA (1964)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price Trust Company
 
Christopher J. Kushlis, CFA (1976)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Shengrong Lau (1982)
Vice President
Vice President, Price Singapore and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Mark J. Lawrence (1970)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Jacqueline Liu (1979)
Vice President
Vice President, Price Hong Kong and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Johannes Loefstrand (1988)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price International
 
Anh Lu (1968)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, Price Hong Kong and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Oxana Lyalina (1987)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price International
 
Sebastien Mallet (1974)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Jennifer Martin (1972)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Ryan Martyn (1979)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Catherine D. Mathews (1963)
Principal Financial Officer, Vice President,
and Treasurer
Vice President, T. Rowe Price, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price Trust Company
 
Raymond A. Mills, Ph.D., CFA (1960)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., T. Rowe Price International, and T. Rowe Price Trust Company
 
Jihong Min (1979)
Vice President
Vice President, Price Singapore and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Eric C. Moffett (1974)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, Price Hong Kong and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Ivan Morozov, CFA (1987)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Samy B. Muaddi, CFA (1984)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Tobias F. Mueller (1980)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Joshua Nelson (1977)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., T. Rowe Price International, and T. Rowe Price Trust Company
 
Philip A. Nestico (1976)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Michael Niedzielski (1979)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International; formerly, Manager and Analyst, Fidelity Investments, Boston and London offices (to 2015)
 
Sridhar Nishtala (1975)
Vice President
Director and Vice President, Price Singapore and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Jason Nogueira, CFA (1974)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Kenneth A. Orchard (1975)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Curt J. Organt, CFA (1968)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Paul T. O’Sullivan (1973)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Oluwaseun A. Oyegunle, CFA (1984)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Gonzalo Pángaro, CFA (1968)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Vivek Rajeswaran (1985)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
John W. Ratzesberger (1975)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price Trust Company
 
Shannon H. Rauser (1987)
Assistant Secretary
Assistant Vice President, T. Rowe Price
 
Todd Reese (1990)
Vice President
Employee, T. Rowe Price; formerly, Investment Analyst, Trian Fund Management (to 2016)
 
Melanie A. Rizzo (1982)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
David L. Rowlett, CFA (1975)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Federico Santilli, CFA (1974)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Nikolaj Schmidt (1975)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Sebastian Schrott (1977)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Bin Shen, CFA (1987)
Vice President
Employee, T. Rowe Price
  
John C.A. Sherman (1969)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Gabriel Solomon (1977)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Scott D. Solomon, CFA (1981)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Joshua K. Spencer, CFA (1973)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price Trust Company
 
David Stanley (1963)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Saurabh Sud, CFA (1985)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.; formerly, Senior Vice President, PIMCO (to 2018)
 
Taymour R. Tamaddon, CFA (1976)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price Trust Company
 
Ju Yen Tan (1972)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Sin Dee Tan, CFA (1979)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Dean Tenerelli (1964)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Siby Thomas (1979)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Justin Thomson (1968)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Mark J. Vaselkiv (1958)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price Trust Company
 
Rupinder Vig (1979)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International; formerly, Partner, Egerton Capital (to 2016)
  
Willem Visser (1979)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International; formerly, Investment Analyst, NN Investment Partners (to 2017)
 
Kes Visuvalingam, CFA (1968)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Chris Vost (1989)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price International
 
Zenon Voyiatzis (1971)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International; formerly, Managing Director, UBS Global Asset Management (to 2015)
 
Verena E. Wachnitz, CFA (1978)
Executive Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
David J. Wallack (1960)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price Trust Company
 
Dai Wang (1989)
Vice President
Vice President, Price Hong Kong and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Megan Warren (1968)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., T. Rowe Price Retirement Plan Services, Inc., T. Rowe Price Services, Inc., and T. Rowe Price Trust Company; formerly, Executive Director, JPMorgan Chase (to 2017)
 
Hiroshi Watanabe, CFA (1975)
Vice President
Director and Vice President, Price Japan; Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Clive M. Williams (1966)
Vice President
Vice President, Price Hong Kong, Price Singapore, T. Rowe Price, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
J. Howard Woodward, CFA (1974)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Marta Yago (1977)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc., and T. Rowe Price International
 
Benjamin T. Yeagle (1978)
Vice President
Vice President, T. Rowe Price and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Ernest C. Yeung, CFA (1979)
Executive Vice President
Director and Vice President, Price Hong Kong; Vice President, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Alison Mei Ling Yip (1966)
Vice President
Vice President, Price Hong Kong and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Eric Yuan (1984)
Vice President
Vice President, Price Hong Kong and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.; formerly, student, Columbia Business School (to 2016)
 
Wenli Zheng (1979)
Vice President
Vice President, Price Hong Kong and T. Rowe Price Group, Inc.
 
Unless otherwise noted, officers have been employees of T. Rowe Price or T. Rowe Price International for at least 5 years.

Item 1. (b) Notice pursuant to Rule 30e-3.

Not applicable.

Item 2. Code of Ethics.

The registrant has adopted a code of ethics, as defined in Item 2 of Form N-CSR, applicable to its principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer or controller, or persons performing similar functions. A copy of this code of ethics is filed as an exhibit to this Form N-CSR. No substantive amendments were approved or waivers were granted to this code of ethics during the period covered by this report.

Item 3. Audit Committee Financial Expert.

The registrant’s Board of Directors/Trustees has determined that Mr. Bruce W. Duncan qualifies as an audit committee financial expert, as defined in Item 3 of Form N-CSR. Mr. Duncan is considered independent for purposes of Item 3 of Form N-CSR.

Item 4. Principal Accountant Fees and Services.

(a) – (d) Aggregate fees billed for the last two fiscal years for professional services rendered to, or on behalf of, the registrant by the registrant’s principal accountant were as follows:


Audit fees include amounts related to the audit of the registrant’s annual financial statements and services normally provided by the accountant in connection with statutory and regulatory filings. Audit-related fees include amounts reasonably related to the performance of the audit of the registrant’s financial statements and specifically include the issuance of a report on internal controls and, if applicable, agreed-upon procedures related to fund acquisitions. Tax fees include amounts related to services for tax compliance, tax planning, and tax advice. The nature of these services specifically includes the review of distribution calculations and the preparation of Federal, state, and excise tax returns. All other fees include the registrant’s pro-rata share of amounts for agreed-upon procedures in conjunction with service contract approvals by the registrant’s Board of Directors/Trustees.

(e)(1) The registrant’s audit committee has adopted a policy whereby audit and non-audit services performed by the registrant’s principal accountant for the registrant, its investment adviser, and any entity controlling, controlled by, or under common control with the investment adviser that provides ongoing services to the registrant require pre-approval in advance at regularly scheduled audit committee meetings. If such a service is required between regularly scheduled audit committee meetings, pre-approval may be authorized by one audit committee member with ratification at the next scheduled audit committee meeting. Waiver of pre-approval for audit or non-audit services requiring fees of a de minimis amount is not permitted.

(2) No services included in (b) – (d) above were approved pursuant to paragraph (c)(7)(i)(C) of Rule 2-01 of Regulation S-X.

(f) Less than 50 percent of the hours expended on the principal accountant’s engagement to audit the registrant’s financial statements for the most recent fiscal year were attributed to work performed by persons other than the principal accountant’s full-time, permanent employees.

(g) The aggregate fees billed for the most recent fiscal year and the preceding fiscal year by the registrant’s principal accountant for non-audit services rendered to the registrant, its investment adviser, and any entity controlling, controlled by, or under common control with the investment adviser that provides ongoing services to the registrant were $2,330,000 and $2,767,000, respectively.

(h) All non-audit services rendered in (g) above were pre-approved by the registrant’s audit committee. Accordingly, these services were considered by the registrant’s audit committee in maintaining the principal accountant’s independence.

Item 5. Audit Committee of Listed Registrants.

Not applicable.

Item 6. Investments.

(a) Not applicable. The complete schedule of investments is included in Item 1 of this Form N-CSR.

(b) Not applicable.

Item 7. Disclosure of Proxy Voting Policies and Procedures for Closed-End Management Investment Companies.

Not applicable.

Item 8. Portfolio Managers of Closed-End Management Investment Companies.

Not applicable.

Item 9. Purchases of Equity Securities by Closed-End Management Investment Company and Affiliated Purchasers.

Not applicable.

Item 10. Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders.

Not applicable.

Item 11. Controls and Procedures.

(a) The registrant’s principal executive officer and principal financial officer have evaluated the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures within 90 days of this filing and have concluded that the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective, as of that date, in ensuring that information required to be disclosed by the registrant in this Form N-CSR was recorded, processed, summarized, and reported timely.

(b) The registrant’s principal executive officer and principal financial officer are aware of no change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the period covered by this report that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

Item 12. Disclosure of Securities Lending Activities for Closed-End Management Investment Companies.

Not applicable.

Item 13. Exhibits.

(a)(1) The registrant’s code of ethics pursuant to Item 2 of Form N-CSR is attached.

(2) Separate certifications by the registrant's principal executive officer and principal financial officer, pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and required by Rule 30a-2(a) under the Investment Company Act of 1940, are attached.

(3) Written solicitation to repurchase securities issued by closed-end companies: not applicable.

(b) A certification by the registrant’s principal executive officer and principal financial officer, pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and required by Rule 30a-2(b) under the Investment Company Act of 1940, is attached.

SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and the Investment Company Act of 1940, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

T. Rowe Price International Funds, Inc.


By       /s/ David Oestreicher
David Oestreicher
Principal Executive Officer     
 
Date       December 17, 2019

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and the Investment Company Act of 1940, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.


By       /s/ David Oestreicher
David Oestreicher
Principal Executive Officer     
 
Date       December 17, 2019
 
 
By /s/ Catherine D. Mathews
Catherine D. Mathews
Principal Financial Officer
 
Date December 17, 2019

Item 13. (a)(2)

CERTIFICATIONS

I, David Oestreicher, certify that:

1. I have reviewed this report on Form N-CSR of T. Rowe Price Emerging Europe Fund;
 
2.       Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;
 
3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations, changes in net assets, and cash flows (if the financial statements are required to include a statement of cash flows) of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;
 
4. The registrant's other certifying officer(s) and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in rule 30a-3(c) under the Investment Company Act of 1940) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 30a-3(d) under the Investment Company Act of 1940) for the registrant and have:
 
(a)       Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;
 
(b) Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;
 
(c) Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant's disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of a date within 90 days prior to the filing date of this report based on such evaluation; and
 
(d) Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the period covered by this report that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and
 
5. The registrant's other certifying officer(s) and I have disclosed to the registrant's auditors and the audit committee of the registrant's board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):
 
(a) All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant's ability to record, process, summarize, and report financial information; and
 
(b) Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant's internal control over financial reporting.

Date: December 17, 2019 /s/ David Oestreicher
David Oestreicher
Principal Executive Officer     

CERTIFICATIONS

I, Catherine D. Mathews, certify that:

1. I have reviewed this report on Form N-CSR of T. Rowe Price Emerging Europe Fund;
 
2.       Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;
 
3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations, changes in net assets, and cash flows (if the financial statements are required to include a statement of cash flows) of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;
 
4. The registrant's other certifying officer(s) and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in rule 30a-3(c) under the Investment Company Act of 1940) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 30a-3(d) under the Investment Company Act of 1940) for the registrant and have:
 
(a)       Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;
 
(b) Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;
 
(c) Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant's disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of a date within 90 days prior to the filing date of this report based on such evaluation; and
 
(d) Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the period covered by this report that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and
 
5. The registrant's other certifying officer(s) and I have disclosed to the registrant's auditors and the audit committee of the registrant's board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):
 
(a) All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant's ability to record, process, summarize, and report financial information; and
 
(b) Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant's internal control over financial reporting.

Date: December 17, 2019 /s/ Catherine D. Mathews
Catherine D. Mathews
Principal Financial Officer     

Item 13. (b)

CERTIFICATION UNDER SECTION 906 OF SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002
 
 
Name of Issuer: T. Rowe Price Emerging Europe Fund
 
 
In connection with the Report on Form N-CSR for the above named Issuer, the undersigned hereby certifies, to the best of his knowledge, that:
 
1.       The Report fully complies with the requirements of Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934;
 
2. The information contained in the Report fairly presents, in all material respects, the financial condition and results of operations of the Issuer.


Date: December 17, 2019 /s/ David Oestreicher
David Oestreicher
Principal Executive Officer     
 
 
Date: December 17, 2019 /s/ Catherine D. Mathews
Catherine D. Mathews
Principal Financial Officer

CODE OF ETHICS FOR PRINCIPAL EXECUTIVE AND SENIOR FINANCIAL
OFFICERS OF THE PRICE FUNDS
UNDER THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

I. General Statement. This Code of Ethics (the “Price Funds S-O Code”) has been designed to bring the Price Funds into compliance with the applicable requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Act”) and rules promulgated by The Securities and Exchange Commission thereunder (“Regulations”). The Price Funds S-O Code applies solely to the Principal Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer, Principal Accounting Officer or Controller of, or persons performing similar functions for, a Price Fund (whether such persons are employed by a Price Fund or third party) (“Covered Officers”). The “Price Funds” shall include each mutual fund that is managed, sponsored and distributed by affiliates of T. Rowe Price Group, Inc. (“Group”). The investment managers to the Price Funds will be referred to as the “Price Fund Advisers.” A list of Covered Officers is attached as Exhibit A.

The Price Fund Advisers have, along with their parent, T. Rowe Price Group, Inc. (“Group”) also maintained a comprehensive Code of Ethics and Conduct (the “Group Code”) since 1972, which applies to all officers, directors and employees of the Price Funds, Group and its affiliates.

As mandated by the Act, Group has adopted a Code (the “Group S-O Code”), similar to the Price Funds S-O Code, which applies solely to its principal executive and senior financial officers. The Group S-O Code and the Price Funds S-O Code will be referred to collectively as the “S-O Codes”.

The Price Funds S-O Code has been adopted by the Price Funds in accordance with the Act and Regulations thereunder and will be administered in conformity with the disclosure requirements of Item 2 of Form N-CSR. The S-O Codes are attachments to the Group Code. In many respects the S-O Codes are supplementary to the Group Code, but the Group Code is administered separately from the S-O Codes, as the S-O Codes are from each other.

II. Purpose of the Price Funds S-O Code. The purpose of the Price Funds S-O Code, as mandated by the Act and the Regulations, is to establish standards that are reasonably designed to deter wrongdoing and to promote:

Ethical Conduct. Honest and ethical conduct, including the ethical handling of actual or apparent conflicts of interest between personal and professional relationships.

Disclosure. Full, fair, accurate, timely and understandable disclosure in reports and documents that the Price Funds file with, or submit to, the SEC and in other public communications made by the Price Funds.

Compliance. Compliance with applicable governmental laws, rules and regulations.

Reporting of Violations. The prompt internal reporting of violations of the Price Funds S-O Code to an appropriate person or persons identified in the Price Funds S-O Code.

Accountability. Accountability for adherence to the Price Funds S-O Code.

III. Covered Officers Should Handle Ethically Actual and Apparent Conflicts of Interest.

Overview. Each Covered Officer owes a duty to the Price Funds to adhere to a high standard of honesty and business ethics and should be sensitive to situations that may give rise to actual as well as apparent conflicts of interest.

A “conflict of interest” occurs when a Covered Officer’s private interest interferes with the interests of, or his or her service to, the Price Funds. For example, a conflict of interest would arise if a Covered Officer, or a member of his or her family, receives improper personal benefits as a result of his or her position with a Price Fund.

Certain conflicts of interest covered by the Price Funds S-O Code arise out of the relationships between Covered Officers and the Price Funds and may already be subject to provisions regulating conflicts of interest in the Investment Company Act of 1940 (“Investment Company Act”), the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (“Investment Advisers Act”) and the Group Code. For example, Covered Officers may not individually engage in certain transactions (such as the purchase or sale of securities or other property) with a Price Fund because of their status as “affiliated persons” of a Price Fund. The compliance programs and procedures of the Price Funds and Price Fund Advisers are designed to prevent, or identify and correct, violations of these provisions.

Although typically not presenting an opportunity for improper personal benefit, conflicts arise from, or as a result of, the contractual relationship between a Price Fund and its Price Fund Adviser (and its affiliates) of which the Covered Officers may also be officers or employees. As a result, the Price Funds S-O Code recognizes that the Covered Officers will, in the normal course of their duties (whether formally for the Price Funds or for the Price Fund Advisers, or for both), be involved in establishing policies and implementing decisions which will have different effects on these entities. The participation of the Covered Officers in such activities is inherent in the contractual relationship between each Price Fund and its respective Price Fund Adviser. Such participation is also consistent with the performance by the Covered Officers of their duties as officers of the Price Funds and, if consistent with the provisions of the Investment Company Act and the Investment Advisers Act, it will be deemed to have been handled ethically.

Other conflicts of interest are covered by the Price Funds S-O Code, even if these conflicts of interest are not addressed by or subject to provisions in the Investment Company Act and the Investment Advisers Act.

Whenever a Covered Officer is confronted with a conflict of interest situation where he or she is uncertain as to the appropriate action to be taken, he or she should discuss the matter with the Chairperson of Group’s Ethics Committee or another member of the Committee.

Handling of Specific Types of Conflicts. Each Covered Officer (and close family members) must not:

Entertainment. Accept entertainment from any company with which any Price Fund or any Price Fund Adviser has current or prospective business dealings, including portfolio companies, unless such entertainment is in full compliance with the policy on entertainment as set forth in the Group Code.

Gifts. Accept any gifts, except as permitted by the Group Code.

Improper Personal Influence. Use his or her personal influence or personal relationships improperly to influence investment decisions, brokerage allocations or financial reporting by the Price Funds to the detriment of any one or more of the Price Funds.

Taking Action at the Expense of a Price Fund. Cause a Price Fund to take action, or fail to take action, for the personal benefit of the Covered Officer rather than for the benefit of one or more of the Price Funds.

Misuse of Price Funds’ Transaction Information. Use knowledge of portfolio transactions made or contemplated for a Price Fund or any other clients of the Price Fund Advisers to trade personally or cause others to trade in order to take advantage of or avoid the market impact of such portfolio transactions.

Outside Business Activities. Engage in any outside business activity that detracts from a Covered Officer’s ability to devote appropriate time and attention to his or her responsibilities to a Price Fund.

Service Providers. Excluding Group and its affiliates, have any ownership interest in, or any consulting or employment relationship with, any of the Price Funds’ service providers, except that an ownership interest in public companies is permitted

Receipt of Payments. Have a direct or indirect financial interest in commissions, transaction charges, spreads or other payments paid by a Price Fund for effecting portfolio transactions or for selling or redeeming shares other than an interest (such as compensation or equity ownership) arising from the Covered Officer’s employment by Group or any of its affiliates.

Service as a Director or Trustee. Serve as a director, trustee or officer of any public or private company or a non-profit organization that issues securities eligible for purchase by any of the Price Funds, unless approval is obtained as required by the Group Code.

IV. Covered Officers’ Specific Obligations and Accountabilities.

A. Disclosure Requirements and Controls. Each Covered Officer must familiarize himself or herself with the disclosure requirements (Form N-1A registration statement, proxy (Schedule 14A), shareholder reports, Forms N-CEN, N-CSR, etc.) applicable to the Price Funds and the disclosure controls and procedures of the Price Fund and the Price Fund Advisers.

B. Compliance with Applicable Law. It is the responsibility of each Covered Officer to promote compliance with all laws, rules and regulations applicable to the Price Funds and the Price Fund Advisers. Each Covered Officer should, to the extent appropriate within his or her area of responsibility, consult with other officers and employees of the Price Funds and the Price Fund Advisers and take other appropriate steps with the goal of promoting full, fair, accurate, timely and understandable disclosure in the reports and documents the Price Funds file with, or submit to, the SEC, and in other public communications made by the Price Funds.

C. Fair Disclosure. Each Covered Officer must not knowingly misrepresent, or cause others to misrepresent, facts about a Price Fund to others, whether within or outside the Price organization, including to the Price Fund’s directors and auditors, and to governmental regulators and self-regulatory organizations.

D. Initial and Annual Affirmations. Each Covered Officer must:

1. Upon adoption of the Price Funds S-O Code (or thereafter, as applicable, upon becoming a Covered Officer), affirm in writing that he or she has received, read, and understands the Price Funds S-O Code.

2. Annually affirm that he or she has complied with the requirements of the Price Funds S-O Code.

E. Reporting of Material Violations of the Price Funds S-O Code. If a Covered Officer becomes aware of any material violation of the Price Funds S-O Code or laws and governmental rules and regulations applicable to the operations of the Price Funds, he or she must promptly report the violation (“Report”) to the Chief Compliance Officer of the Price Funds (“CCO”). Failure to report a material violation will be considered itself a violation of the Price Funds S-O Code. The CCO is identified in the attached Exhibit B.

It is the Price Funds policy that no retaliation or other adverse action will be taken against any Covered Officer or other employee of a Price Fund, a Price Fund Adviser or their affiliates based upon any lawful actions of the Covered Officer or employee with respect to a Report made in good faith.

F. Annual Disclosures. Each Covered Officer must report, at least annually, all affiliations or other relationships as called for in the “Annual Compliance Certification” for T. Rowe Price Group.

V. Administration of the Price Funds S-O Code. The Ethics Committee is responsible for administering the Price Funds S-O Code and applying its provisions to specific situations in which questions are presented.

A. Waivers and Interpretations. The Chairperson of the Ethics Committee has the authority to interpret the Price Funds S-O Code in any particular situation and to grant waivers where justified, subject to the approval of the Joint Audit Committee of the Price Funds. All material interpretations concerning Covered Officers will be reported to the Joint Audit Committee of the Price Funds at its next meeting. Waivers, including implicit waivers, to Covered Officers will be publicly disclosed as required in the Instructions to N-CSR. Pursuant to the definition in the Regulations, an implicit waiver means a Price Fund’s failure to take action within a reasonable period of time regarding a material departure from a provision of the Price Funds S-O Code that has been made known to an “executive officer” (as defined in Rule 3b-7 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934) of a Price Fund. An executive officer of a Price Fund includes its president and any vice-president in charge of a principal business unit, division or function.

B. Violations/Investigations. The following procedures will be followed in investigating and enforcing the Price Funds S-O Code:

1. The CCO will take or cause to be taken appropriate action to investigate any potential or actual violation reported to him or her.

2. The CCO, after consultation if deemed appropriate with Outside Counsel to the Price Funds, will make a recommendation to the appropriate Price Funds Board regarding the action to be taken with regard to each material violation. Such action could include any of the following: a letter of censure or suspension, a fine, a suspension of trading privileges or termination of officership or employment. In addition, the violator may be required to surrender any profit realized (or loss avoided) from any activity that is in violation of the Price Funds S-O Code.

VI. Amendments to the Price Funds S-O Code. Except as to the contents of Exhibit A and Exhibit B, the Price Funds S-O Code may not be materially amended except in written form, which is specifically approved or ratified by a majority vote of each Price Fund Board, including a majority of the independent directors on each Board.

VII. Confidentiality. All reports and records prepared or maintained pursuant to the Price Funds S-O Code will be considered confidential and shall be maintained and protected accordingly. Except as otherwise required by law, the Price Funds S-O Code or as necessary in connection with regulations under the Price Funds S-O Code, such matters shall not be disclosed to anyone other than the directors of the appropriate Price Fund Board, Outside Counsel to the Price Funds, members of the Ethics Committee and the CCO and authorized persons on his or her staff.

Adoption Date: 10/22/03

Last Revised: July 24, 2018

Exhibit A
Persons Covered by the Price Funds S-O Code of Ethics
David Oestreicher, Executive Vice President and Principal Executive Officer
Catherine D. Mathews, Treasurer and Principal Financial Officer

Exhibit B
John R. Gilner, Chief Compliance Officer



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