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Form 20-F QUARTZ MOUNTAIN RESOURCE For: Jul 31

November 28, 2022 5:18 PM EST

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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 20-F

 

     REGISTRATION STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) or 12(g) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

OR

 

     ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended July 31, 2022

 

OR

 

     TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

OR

 

     SHELL COMPANY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

Commission file number 0-15490

 

QUARTZ MOUNTAIN RESOURCES LTD.

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

 

BRITISH COLUMBIA, Canada

(Jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

 

14th Floor, 1040 West Georgia Street

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V6E 4H1

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

Sebastian Tang, Chief Financial Officer

Facsimile No.: 604-681-2741

14th Floor, 1040 West Georgia Street

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V6E 4H1

(Name, Telephone, E-mail and/or Facsimile number and Address of Company Contact Person)

  

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act.

 

Title of Each Class:

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Not applicable

 

Not applicable

 

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act Common shares, no par value

 

Securities for which there is a reporting obligation pursuant to Section 15(d) of the Act.

 

None

 

Indicate the number of outstanding shares of each of the issuer's classes of capital or common stock as of the close of the period covered by the annual report:

 

41,114,141 common shares as of July 31, 2022

 

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

 

Yes ☐                                                                   No

 

If this report is an annual or transition report, indicate by check mark if the Registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

 

Yes ☐                                                                   No

 

Indicate by check mark whether Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

 

Yes ☒                                                                   No ☐ 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).

 

Yes ☐                                                                   No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or non-accelerated filer. See definition of "accelerated filer" and "large accelerated filer" in Rule 126-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large Accelerated Filer ☐

Accelerated Filer ☐

Non-Accelerated Filer

 

Indicate by check mark which basis of accounting the registrant has used to prepare the financial statements included in this filing:

 

U.S. GAAP ☐

International Financial Reporting Standards as issued     ☒

by the International Accounting Standards Board

Other ☐

 

If "Other" has been checked in response to the previous question, indicate by check mark which financial statement item the registrant has elected to follow.

 

Item 17 ☐                                                           Item 18 ☐

 

If this is an annual report, indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act):

 

Yes                                                                    No ☒ 

 

 

 

 

GENERAL

4

 

 

CURRENCY AND MEASUREMENT

5

 

 

NOTE ON FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS

6

 

 

ITEM 1

IDENTITY OF DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND ADVISERS

7

 

 

 

ITEM 2

OFFER STATISTICS AND EXPECTED TIMETABLE

7

 

 

 

ITEM 3

KEY INFORMATION

7

A.

SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

8

B.

CAPITALIZATION AND INDEBTEDNESS

8

C.

REASONS FOR THE OFFER AND USE OF PROCEEDS

8

D.

RISK FACTORS

8

 

 

 

ITEM 4

INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY

13

A.

HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE COMPANY

13

B.

BUSINESS OVERVIEW

13

C.

MINERAL PROPERTIES AND EXPLORATION ACTIVITIES AND PLANS

15

D.

ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

20

E.

PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

20

F.

CURRENCY

20

 

 

 

ITEM 4A

UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

21

 

 

 

ITEM 5

OPERATING AND FINANCIAL REVIEW AND PROSPECTS OVERVIEW

21

 

 

 

 

 

 

A.

OPERATING RESULTS

21

B.

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

21

C.

RESEARCH EXPENDITURES

23

D.

TREND INFORMATION

24

E.

OFF – BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS

24

F.

TABULAR DISCLOSURE OF CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS

25

G.

SAFE HARBOR

25

 

 

 

ITEM 6

DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND EMPLOYEES

25

A.

DIRECTORS AND SENIOR MANAGEMENT

25

B.

COMPENSATION

27

C.

BOARD PRACTICES

29

D.

EMPLOYEES

32

E.

SHARE OWNERSHIP

32

 

 

 

ITEM 7

MAJOR SHAREHOLDERS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

33

A.

MAJOR SHAREHOLDERS

33

B.

RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

34

C.

INTERESTS OF EXPERTS AND COUNSEL

34

 

 

 

ITEM 8

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

35

A.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INFORMATION

35

B.

SIGNIFICANT CHANGES

35

 

 

 

ITEM 9

THE OFFER AND LISTING

35

A.

OFFER AND LISTING DETAILS

36

B.

PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION

36

C.

MARKETS

36

D.

SELLING SHAREHOLDERS

36

E.

DILUTION

36

 

 

2

 

  

F.

EXPENSES OF THE ISSUE

37

 

 

 

ITEM 10

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

37

A.

SHARE CAPITAL

37

B.

MEMORANDUM AND ARTICLES OF ASSOCIATION

37

C.

MATERIAL CONTRACTS

39

D.

EXCHANGE CONTROLS

39

E.

TAXATION

39

F.

DIVIDENDS AND PAYING AGENTS

47

G.

STATEMENT BY EXPERTS

48

H.

DOCUMENTS ON DISPLAY

48

I.

SUBSIDIARY INFORMATION

48

 

 

 

ITEM 11

QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

48

A.

TRANSACTION RISK AND CURRENCY RISK MANAGEMENT

48

B.

EXCHANGE RATE SENSITIVITY

48

C.

INTEREST RATE RISK AND EQUITY PRICE RISK

48

D.

COMMODITY PRICE RISK

48

 

 

 

ITEM 12

DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES OTHER THAN EQUITY SECURITIES

48

 

 

 

ITEM 13

DEFAULTS, DIVIDEND ARREARAGES AND DELINQUENCIES

48

 

 

 

ITEM 14

MATERIAL MODIFICATIONS TO THE RIGHTS OF SECURITY HOLDERS AND USE OF PROCEEDS

49

 

 

 

ITEM 15

CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

49

A.

DISCLOSURE CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

49

B.

MANAGEMENT'S ANNUAL REPORT ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING

49

 

 

 

CHANGES IN INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING

49

 

 

LIMITATIONS OF CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

50

 

 

ITEM 16

[RESERVED]

51

 

 

 

ITEM 16A

AUDIT COMMITTEE FINANCIAL EXPERT

51

 

 

 

ITEM 16B

CODE OF ETHICS

51

 

 

 

ITEM 16C

PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

51

 

 

 

ITEM 16D

EXEMPTIONS FROM LISTING STANDARDS FOR AUDIT COMMITTEES

51

 

 

 

ITEM 16E

PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES BY THE ISSUER AND AFFILIATED PURCHASERS

51

 

 

 

ITEM 16F

CHANGE IN REGISTRANT'S CERTIFYING ACCOUNTANT

51

 

 

 

ITEM 16G

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

51

 

 

 

ITEM 16H

MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURE

51

 

 

 

ITEM 17

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

51

 

 

 

ITEM 18

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

51

 

 

 

ITEM 19

EXHIBITS

52

  

 
3

 

 

GENERAL

 

In this Annual Report on Form 20-F, all references to "we", the "Company”, or "Quartz Mountain" refer to Quartz Mountain Resources Ltd. and its consolidated subsidiary.

 

The Company uses the Canadian dollar as its reporting currency. All references in this document to "dollars" or "$" are expressed in Canadian dollars, unless otherwise indicated. See also Item 3 – "Key Information" for more detailed currency and conversion information.

 

Except as noted, the information set forth in this Annual Report is as of November 25, 2022 and all information included in this document should only be considered correct as of such date.

 

This annual report includes certain statements that may be deemed "forward-looking-statements". All statements in this release, other than statements of historical facts are forward-looking-statements.  Although the Company believes the expectations expressed in such forward-looking statements are based on reasonable assumptions, such statements are not guarantees of future performance and actual results or developments may differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements. Assumptions used by the Company to develop forward-looking statements include the following: the Company's projects will obtain all required environmental and other permits, and all land use and other licenses, studies and exploration of the Company’s projects will continue to be positive, and no geological or technical problems will occur. Though the Company believes the expectations expressed in its forward-looking-statements are based on reasonable assumptions, such statements are subject to future events and third party discretion such as regulatory personnel. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those in forward-looking statements include variations in market prices, continuity of mineralization and exploration success, and potential environmental issues or liabilities associated with exploration, development and mining activities, uncertainties related to the ability to obtain necessary permits, licenses and tenure and delays due to third party opposition, changes in and the effect of government policies regarding mining and natural resource exploration and exploitation, and exploration and development of properties located within Aboriginal groups asserted territories that may affect or be perceived to affect asserted aboriginal rights and title, and which may cause permitting delays or opposition by Aboriginal groups, continued availability of capital and financing, and general economic, market or business conditions as well as the effect of COVID 19. Investors are cautioned that any such statements are not guarantees of future performance and actual results or developments may differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements. For more information on the Company, and the risks and uncertainties connected with its business, investors should review the Company's home jurisdiction filings as www.sedar.com and its filings with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

 
4

 

 

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

 

Certain terms used herein are defined as follows:

 

Epithermal Deposit

 

Deposits formed when the fluids are directed through a structure where the temperature, pressure and chemical conditions are favourable for the deposition of ore minerals, including native gold.

 

Induced Polarization (“IP”) Survey

 

A geophysical survey used to identify a feature that appears to be different from the typical or background survey results when tested for levels of electro-conductivity; IP detects both chargeable, pyrite-bearing rock and non-conductive rock that has a high content of quartz.

 

Mineral Symbols

 

Au – gold; Ag – silver; Cu – copper; Mo – molybdenum.

 

Net Smelter Return (NSR) Royalty

 

Monies received for concentrate delivered to a smelter net of metallurgical recovery losses, transportation costs, smelter treatment-refining charges and penalty charges.

 

Porphyry Deposit

 

Mineral deposit characterized by widespread disseminated or veinlet-hosted sulphide mineralization, characterized by large tonnage and moderate to low grade. 

 

Sulphide and Sulphosalt

 

Comprise a group of minerals in which the inorganic anion sulphide (S-2) is typically bound to a metal and are a major source of a wide range of metals. Sulphosalts are a subgroup that may contain bismuth, antimony or arsenic.

 

Vein

 

A tabular or sheet-like mineral deposit with identifiable walls, often filling a fracture or fissure.

 

 

CURRENCY AND MEASUREMENT

 

All currency amounts in this Annual Report are stated in Canadian dollars unless otherwise indicated. Conversion of metric units into imperial equivalents is as follows:

 

Metric Units

Multiply by

Imperial Units

 

Hectares

 

2.471

 

= acres

 

Meters

 

3.281

 

= feet

 

kilometers

 

0.621

 

= miles (5,280 feet)

 

Grams

 

0.032

 

= troy ounces

 

Tons

 

1.102

 

= short tons (2,000 lbs.)

 

grams per ton

 

0.029

 

= troy ounces per ton

 

 
5

 

 

NOTE ON FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This Annual Report on Form 20-F contains statements that constitute "forward-looking statements". Any statements that are not statements of historical facts may be deemed forward-looking statements. These statements appear in a number of different places in this Annual Report and, in some cases, can be identified by words such as "anticipates", "estimates", "projects", "expects", "intends", "believes", "plans", or their negatives or other comparable words. The forward-looking statements, including the statements contained in Item 3D "Risk Factors", Item 4B "Business Overview", Item 5 "Operating and Financial Review and Prospects" and Item 11 "Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk", involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause the Company's actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements that may be expressed or implied by such statements. Forward-looking statements include statements regarding the outlook for the Company's future operations, plans and timing for the Company's exploration programs, statements about future market conditions, supply and demand conditions, forecasts of future costs and expenditures, the outcome of legal proceedings, and other expectations, intentions and plans that are not historical facts.

 

You are cautioned that forward-looking statements are not guarantees. The risks and uncertainties that could cause the Company's actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements include:

 

·

changes in general economic and business conditions, including commodity prices, costs associated with mineral exploration and development, changes in interest rates and the availability of financing on reasonable terms;

 

 

·

natural phenomena, including geological and meteorological phenomena;

 

 

·

actions by government authorities, including changes in government regulation and permitting requirements;

 

 

·

uncertainties associated with legal proceedings;

 

 

·

future decisions by management in response to changing conditions;

 

 

·

the Company's ability to execute prospective business plans; and

 

 

·

misjudgments in the course of preparing forward-looking statements.

 

The Company advises you that these cautionary remarks expressly qualify, in their entirety, all forward-looking statements attributable to Quartz Mountain or persons acting on the Company's behalf. The Company assumes no obligation to update the Company's forward-looking statements to reflect actual results, changes in assumptions or changes in other factors affecting such statements. You should carefully review the cautionary statements and risk factors contained in this and other documents that the Company files from time to time with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

 
6

 

 

ITEM 1 IDENTITY OF DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND ADVISERS

 

Not applicable for an annual report.

 

ITEM 2 OFFER STATISTICS AND EXPECTED TIMETABLE

 

Not applicable for an annual report.

 

ITEM 3 KEY INFORMATION

 

A. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

The following tables summarize selected financial data for the Company (stated in Canadian dollars) prepared, in respect of the years ended July 31, 2022 and July 31, 2021, in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”) as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (“IASB”) (“IFRS-IASB”).

 

As permitted by SEC Release No. 33-8879 “Acceptance from Foreign Private Issuers of Financial Statements Prepared in Accordance with International Reporting Standards without Reconciliation to U.S. GAAP”, the Company includes selected financial data prepared in compliance with IFRS-IASB without reconciliation to U.S. GAAP.

 

The selected financial data of the Company for the fiscal years presented was derived from the consolidated financial statements of the Company that have been audited by Davidson & Company LLP, independent Registered Public Accountants, as indicated in their audit report which is included at Exhibit 99.1 in this Annual Report.

 

The auditors conducted their audits in accordance with United States and Canadian generally accepted auditing standards, and the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States).

 

 

 

Year ended

July 31, 2022

 

 

Year ended

July 31, 2021

 

 

Year ended

July 31, 2020

 

 

Year ended

July 31, 2019

 

 

Year ended

July 31, 2018

 

Sales revenue

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

Loss (income) from operating expenses

 

$1,132,515

 

 

$254,168

 

 

$249,442

 

 

$149,170

 

 

$236,319

 

Loss (income) and comprehensive loss (income)

 

$995,066

 

 

$116,419

 

 

$(2,524,763)

 

$153,715

 

 

$234,467

 

Basic loss (earnings) per common share

 

$0.03

 

 

$0.00

 

 

$(0.16)

 

$0.02

 

 

$0.02

 

Diluted loss (earnings) per common share

 

$0.02

 

 

$0.00

 

 

$(0.13)

 

$0.02

 

 

$0.02

 

Dividends per share

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

Working capital

 

$40,912

 

 

$117,847

 

 

$138,550

 

 

$(2,995,655)

 

$(2,841,940)

Total assets

 

$842,553

 

 

$598,556

 

 

$218,559

 

 

$80,562

 

 

$75,034

 

Shareholder’s deficiency (equity)

 

$(510,265)

 

$(463,515)

 

$(138,551)

 

$2,995,654

 

 

$2,841,939

 

Share capital

 

$28,445,261

 

 

$27,599,806

 

 

$27,158,423

 

 

$26,548,981

 

 

$26,548,981

 

Shares outstanding

 

 

41,114,141

 

 

 

31,205,049

 

 

 

25,477,776

 

 

 

3,347,137

 

 

 

3,347,137

 

 

 
7

 

 

Currency and Exchange Rates

 

On November 25, 2022 the rate of exchange of the Canadian dollar, based on the daily noon rate in Canada as published by the Bank of Canada, was US$1 = Canadian $1.3338.

 

The following tables set out the exchange rates, based on the daily noon rates in Canada as published by Bank of Canada for the conversion of Canadian dollars per U.S. dollar.

 

 

 

For the fiscal year ended July 31, (Canadian Dollars per U.S. Dollar)

 

 

 

2022

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

End of Period

 

 

1.2824

 

 

 

1.2462

 

 

 

1.3404

 

 

 

1.3193

 

 

 

1.3008

 

Average for the Period (1)

 

 

1.2692

 

 

 

1.2741

 

 

 

1.3463

 

 

 

1.3235

 

 

 

1.2760

 

High for the Period

 

 

1.3139

 

 

 

1.3404

 

 

 

1.4496

 

 

 

1.3641

 

 

 

1.3137

 

Low for the Period

 

 

1.2329

 

 

 

1.2040

 

 

 

1.2970

 

 

 

1.2815

 

 

 

1.2314

 

 

(1) The average rate for each period is the average of the daily noon rates on the last day of each month during the period.

 

Monthly High and Low Exchange Rate (Canadian Dollars per U.S. Dollar)

Month

 

High

 

 

Low

 

October 2022

 

 

1.3856

 

 

 

1.3547

 

September 2022

 

 

1.3726

 

 

 

1.2980

 

August 2022

 

 

1.3111

 

 

 

1.2753

 

July 2022

 

 

1.3138

 

 

 

1.2824

 

June 2022

 

 

1.3035

 

 

 

1.2540

 

 

B. CAPITALIZATION AND INDEBTEDNESS

 

Not applicable.

 

C. REASONS FOR THE OFFER AND USE OF PROCEEDS

 

Not applicable.

 

D. RISK FACTORS

 

The risk factors associated with the principal business of the Company are discussed below. The Company does not currently hold any mineral properties but is looking for new opportunities. If it acquires a new mineral property(s), the Company would be subject to the highly speculative nature of the resources industry characterized by the requirement for large capital investments from an early stage and a very small probability of finding economic mineral deposits. In addition to the general risks of mining, there are country-specific risks, including currency, political, social, permitting and legal risk. An investor should carefully consider the risks described below and the other information that Quartz Mountain furnishes to, or files with, the Securities and Exchange Commission and with Canadian securities regulators before investing in Quartz Mountain's common shares, and should not consider an investment in Quartz Mountain unless the investor is capable of sustaining an economic loss of the entire investment. The Company's actual exploration and operating results may be very different from those expected as at the date of this document.

 

Going Concern Assumption

 

The Company's financial statements have been prepared assuming the Company will continue on a going concern basis. However, unless additional funding is obtained, this assumption will have to change. The Company has positive working capital, and incurred losses since inception. Failure to continue as a going concern would require that Quartz Mountain's assets and liabilities be restated on a liquidation basis, which could differ significantly from the going concern basis.

 

 
8

 

 

Additional Funding Requirements

 

Further development of the Company's continued operations will require additional capital. The Company currently does not have sufficient funds to explore the properties it holds. It is possible that the financing required by the Company will not be available, or, if available, will not be available on acceptable terms. If the Company does issue treasury shares to finance its operations or expansion plans, shareholders will suffer dilution of their investment and control of the Company may change. If adequate funds are not available, or are not available on acceptable terms, the Company will not be able to remain in business. In addition, a positive production decision at any of the Company's current projects or any other development projects acquired in the future will require significant resources and funding for project engineering and construction. Accordingly, any development of the Company's properties depends upon the Company's ability to obtain financing through debt financing, equity financing, the joint venturing, or disposition of its current projects, or other means. There is no assurance that the Company will be successful in obtaining financing for these or other purposes, including for general working capital.

 

Future Profits/Losses and Production Revenues/Expenses

 

The Company has no history of mining operations or earnings, and expects that its losses and negative cash flow will continue for the foreseeable future. No deposit that has been shown to be economic has yet been found on the Company's projects.There can be no assurance that the Company will be able to acquire any additional properties.There can be no assurance that the Company will, if needed, be able to acquire a property(s) of sufficient technical merit to represent a compelling investment opportunity. If the Company is unable to acquire a property(s), its entire prospects will rest solely with its current net smelter royalty interest in the Angel Camp Project and accordingly, the risk of being unable to identify a mineral deposit will be higher than if the Company had additional properties to explore. There can be no assurance that the Company will ever be profitable in the future. The Company's operating expenses and capital expenditures may increase in subsequent years as consultants, personnel and equipment associated with advancing exploration, development and commercial production of any properties that the Company may acquire are added. The amounts and timing of expenditures will depend on the progress of on-going exploration, the results of consultants' analyses and recommendations, the rate at which operating losses are incurred, the execution of any joint venture agreements with strategic partners, and the Company's acquisition of a property(s) and other factors, many of which are beyond the Company's control. The Company does not expect to receive revenues from operations in the foreseeable future, and expects to incur losses unless and until such time as it acquires a property(s), commence commercial production, and generate sufficient revenues to fund its continuing operations. The development of any properties the Company may acquire will require the commitment of substantial resources to conduct the time-consuming exploration and development of properties. The Company anticipates that it would retain any cash resources and potential future earnings for the future operation and development of the Company's business. The Company has not paid dividends since incorporation and the Company does not anticipate paying any dividends in the foreseeable future. There can be no assurance that the Company will generate any revenues or achieve profitability. There can be no assurance that the underlying assumed levels of expenses will prove to be accurate. To the extent that such expenses do not result in the creation of appropriate revenues, the Company's business will be materially adversely affected. It is not possible to forecast how the business of the Company will develop.

 

Exploration, Development and Mining Risks

 

Resource exploration, development, and operations are highly speculative, characterized by a number of significant risks, which even a combination of careful evaluation, experience and knowledge may not reduce, including among other things, unsuccessful efforts resulting not only from the failure to discover mineral deposits but from finding mineral deposits which, though present, are insufficient in quantity and quality to return a profit from production. Few properties that are explored are ultimately developed into producing mines. Unusual or unexpected formations, formation pressures, fires, power outages, labor disruptions, flooding, explosions, cave-ins, landslides, and the inability to obtain suitable or adequate machinery, equipment, or labor are other risks involved in the operation of mines and the conduct of exploration programs. The Company will rely upon consultants and others for exploration, development, construction, and operating expertise. Substantial expenditures are required to establish mineral resources and mineral reserves through drilling, to develop metallurgical processes to extract the metal from mineral resources, and in the case of new properties, to develop the mining and processing facilities and infrastructure at any site chosen for mining.

 

No assurance can be given that minerals will be discovered in sufficient quantities to justify commercial operations or that funds required for development can be obtained on a timely basis. Whether a mineral deposit will be commercially viable depends on a number of factors, some of

 

which are: the particular attributes of the deposit, such as size, grade and proximity to infrastructure; metal prices, which are highly cyclical; and government regulations, including regulations relating to prices, taxes, royalties, land tenure, land use, importing and exporting of minerals, and environmental protection. The exact effect of these factors cannot accurately be predicted, but the combination of these factors may result in the Company not receiving an adequate return on invested capital.

 

 
9

 

 

Permits and Licenses

 

Although the Company has exercised reasonable due diligence with respect to determining title to properties it owns or leases, there is no guarantee that title to such properties and other tenure will not be challenged or impugned. No assurances can be given that there are no title defects affecting the properties. There may be valid challenges to the title of the Company’s properties which, if successful, could make the Company unable to operate its properties as planned or permitted, or unable to enforce its rights with respect to its properties. In British Columbia the rights of aboriginal peoples and their claims to much of the Province are not settled.

 

Changes in Local Legislation or Regulation

 

Any mining and processing operations that may be acquired and any exploration activities that might be conducted would be subject to extensive laws and regulations governing the protection of the environment, exploration, development, production, exports, taxes, labor standards, occupational health, waste disposal, toxic substances, mine and worker safety, protection of endangered and other special status species and other matters. The Company's ability to obtain permits and approvals and to successfully operate in particular communities may be adversely impacted by real or perceived detrimental events associated with the Company's activities or those of other mining companies affecting the environment, human health and safety of the surrounding communities. Delays in obtaining or failure to obtain government permits and approvals may adversely affect the Company's operations, including its ability to explore or develop properties, commence production or continue operations. Failure to comply with applicable environmental and health and safety laws and regulations may result in injunctions, fines, suspension, or revocation of permits and other penalties. The costs and delays associated with compliance with these laws, regulations and permits could prevent the Company from proceeding with the development of a project or the operation or further development of a mine or increase the costs of development or production and may materially adversely affect the Company's business, results of operations or financial condition. The Company may also be held responsible for the costs of addressing contamination at the site of current or former activities or at third party sites. The Company could also be held liable for exposure to hazardous substances.

 

Environmental Matters

 

All of the operations that the Company might acquire would be subject to environmental regulations, which can make operations expensive or prohibit them altogether. The Company may be subject to potential risks and liabilities associated with pollution of the environment and the disposal of waste products that could occur because of its mineral exploration, development, and production. In addition, environmental hazards may exist on a property in which the Company directly or indirectly holds an interest, which are unknown to the Company at present and have been caused by previous or existing owners or operators of the Company's projects. Environmental legislation provides for restrictions and prohibitions on spills, releases or emissions of various substances produced in association with certain mining industry operations that would result in environmental pollution. A breach of such legislation may result in the imposition of fines and penalties, or the requirement to remedy environmental pollution, which would reduce funds otherwise available to the Company and could have a material adverse effect on the Company. If the Company is unable to remedy an environmental problem, it could be required to suspend operations or undertake interim compliance measures pending completion of the required remedy, which could have a material adverse effect on the Company.

 

There is no assurance that future changes in environmental regulation, if any, will not adversely affect the Company's operations. There is also a risk that the environmental laws and regulations may become more onerous, making the Company's operations more expensive. Many of the environmental laws and regulations will require the Company to obtain permits for its activities. The Company will be required to update and review its permits from time to time, and may be subject to environmental impact analyses and public review processes prior to approval of the additional activities. It is possible that future changes in applicable laws, regulations, and permits or changes in their enforcement or regulatory interpretation could have a significant impact on some portion of the Company's business, causing those activities to be economically re-evaluated at that time.

 

 
10

 

 

Groups Opposed to Mining May Interfere with the Company's Efforts to Explore and Develop its Properties

 

Organizations opposed to mining may be active in the regions in which the Company conducts its exploration activities. Although the Company intends to comply with all environmental laws and maintain good relations with local communities, there is still the possibility that those opposed to mining will attempt to interfere with the development of any property(s) the Company might acquire. Such interference could have an impact on the Company's ability to explore and develop its properties in a manner that is most efficient or appropriate, or at all and any such impact could have a material adverse effect on the Company's financial condition and the results of its operations.

 

Market for Securities and Volatility of Share Price

 

There can be no assurance that an active trading market in the Company's securities will be established or sustained. The market price for the Company's securities is subject to wide fluctuations. Factors such as announcements of exploration results, as well as market conditions in the industry or the economy as a whole, may have a significant adverse impact on the market price of the securities of the Company.

 

The stock market has from time to time experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations that have often been unrelated to the operating performance of particular companies.

 

Conflicts of Interest

 

The Company's directors and officers may serve as directors or officers of other companies, joint venture partners, or companies providing services to the Company or they may have significant shareholdings in other companies. Situations may arise where the directors and/or officers of the Company may be in competition with the Company. Any conflicts of interest will be subject to and governed by the law applicable to directors' and officers' conflicts of interest. In the event that such a conflict of interest arises at a meeting of the Company's directors, a director who has such a conflict will abstain from voting for or against the approval of such participation or such terms. In accordance with applicable laws, the directors of the Company are required to act honestly, in good faith and in the best interests of the Company.

 

General Economic Conditions

 

Global financial markets have experienced a sharp increase in volatility during the last few years. Market conditions and unexpected volatility or illiquidity in financial markets may adversely affect the prospects of the Company and the value of the Company's shares.

 

Reliance on Key Personnel

 

The Company is dependent on the continued services of its senior management team, and its ability to retain other key personnel. The loss of such key personnel could have a material adverse effect on the Company. There can be no assurance that any of the Company's employees will remain with the Company or that, in the future, the employees will not organize competitive businesses or accept employment with companies competitive with the Company.

 

There can be no assurance that the Company will be able to attract, train, or retain qualified personnel in the future, which would adversely affect its business.

 

Competition

 

The resources industry is highly competitive in all its phases, and the Company will compete with other mining companies, many of which have greater financial, technical, and other resources. Competition in the mining industry is primarily for attractive mineral rich properties capable of being developed and producing economically; the technical expertise to find, develop, and operate such properties; the labor to operate the properties; and the capital for the purpose of funding such properties. Many competitors not only explore for and mine certain minerals, but also conduct production and marketing operations on a worldwide basis. Such competition may result in the Company being unable to acquire desired properties, to recruit or retain qualified employees or to acquire the capital necessary to fund its operations and develop any property(s) the Company might acquire. The Company's inability to compete with other mining companies for these resources could have a materially adverse effect on the Company's results of operation and its business.

 
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Uninsurable Risks

 

In the course of exploration, development and production of mineral properties, certain risks, and in particular, unexpected or unusual geological operating conditions including rock bursts, cave ins, fires, flooding and earthquakes may occur. It is not always possible to fully insure against such risks and the Company may decide not to take out insurance against such risks because of high premiums or other reasons.

 

Likely PFIC status has consequences for United States investors

 

Potential investors who are U.S. taxpayers should be aware that the Company expects to be classified for U.S. tax purposes as a passive foreign investment company ("PFIC") for the current fiscal year, and may also have been a PFIC in prior years and may be a PFIC in future years. If the Company is a PFIC for any year during a U.S. taxpayer's holding period, then such U.S. taxpayer generally will be required to treat any so-called "excess distribution" on its common shares, or any gain realized upon a disposition of common shares, as ordinary income which would be taxed at the shareholder's highest marginal rates and to pay an interest charge on a portion of such distribution or gain, unless the taxpayer has made a timely qualified electing fund ("QEF") election or a mark-to-market election with respect to the shares of the Company. In certain circumstances, the sum of the tax and the interest charge may exceed the amount of the excess distribution received, or the amount of proceeds of disposition realized, by the taxpayer. A U.S. taxpayer who makes a QEF election generally must report on a current basis its share of the Company's net capital gain and ordinary earnings for any year in which the Company is a PFIC, whether or not the Company distributes any amounts to its shareholders. A U.S. taxpayer who makes the mark-to-market election generally must include as ordinary income each year the excess of the fair market value of the common shares over the taxpayer's tax basis therein. See also Item 10E – "Passive Foreign Investment Company".

 

Potential investors should also note that recently enacted legislation may require U.S. shareholders to report their interest in a PFIC on an annual basis. US shareholders of the Company should consult their tax advisors as to these reporting requirements as well as the consequences of investing in the Company.

 

Penny stock classification

 

Penny stock classification could affect the marketability of the Company's common stock and shareholders could find it difficult to sell their stock

 

The penny stock rules in the United States require a broker-dealer, prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from the rules, to deliver a standardized risk disclosure document that provides information about penny stocks and the nature and level of risks in the penny stock market. The broker-dealer also must provide the customer with current bid and offer quotations for the penny stock, the compensation of the broker-dealer and its salesperson in the transaction, and monthly account statements showing the market value of each penny stock held in the customer's account. The bid and offer quotations, and the broker-dealer and salesperson compensation information, must be given to the customer orally or in writing prior to effecting the transaction and must be given to the customer in writing before or with the customer's confirmation.

 

Further, the penny stock rules require that prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from such rules; the broker-dealer must make a special written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the purchaser and receive the purchaser's written agreement to the transaction. These additional broker-dealer practice and disclosure requirements may have the effect of reducing the level of trading activity in the secondary market for the Company's common shares in the U.S., and shareholders may find it more difficult to sell their shares.

 

 
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ITEM 4 INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY

 

A. HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE COMPANY

 

Incorporation

 

The legal name of the Company is "Quartz Mountain Resources Ltd."

 

Quartz Mountain Resources Ltd. was incorporated on August 3, 1982, in British Columbia, Canada, and it continues to subsist under the laws of the Province of British Columbia.

 

The Company was originally incorporated as Wavecrest Resources Ltd. but changed its name to Quartz Mountain Gold Corp. on June 18, 1986. On November 5, 1997, the name of the Company was changed from Quartz Mountain Gold Corp. to Quartz Mountain Resources Ltd., and the common shares were consolidated on a ten-old-for-one-new share basis.

 

Market for the Company's Securities

 

The Company's common shares were quoted on NASDAQ SmallCap Market in the United States from September 17, 1987 until May 12, 1994. The Company's common shares were also listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange until November 10, 1994. 

       

In 2000, the Company listed on a newly created Tier 3 of the Canadian Venture Exchange (now renamed the TSX Venture Exchange ("TSX-V")). In December 2003, the Company was reclassified as a Tier 2 company on the TSX-V. On February 17, 2005, the Company transferred its listing to NEX, a separate board of the TSX-V established in 2003 to provide a new trading forum for listed companies that had fallen below the TSX-V's continued listing standards, due to low levels of business activity.

 

The Company was relisted on the TSX-V on December 30, 2011.

 

Currently, the Company's common shares trade on the TSX-V under the symbol QZM, and certain broker-dealers in the United States make market in the Company's common shares on the OTC Grey Market under the symbol QZMRF.

 

Offices

 

The Company's business office is located at 14th Floor, 1040 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6E 4H1; telephone (604) 684-6365. The Company's registered office is Suite 1500 – 1055 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6E 4N7, telephone (604) 689-9111.

 

B. BUSINESS OVERVIEW

 

The Company's Business Strategy and Principal Activities

 

Quartz Mountain has been in the business of exploring and advancing mineral properties. The Company’s activities on the properties have been primarily focused on ascertaining whether the properties host commercially viable mineral deposits.

 

In the first three years of its existence, the Company was active in the exploration of small gold and silver prospects in Canada, but none of these prospects warranted further exploration or development. In 1986, the Company acquired the Quartz Mountain gold property, located in south central Oregon, and until January 2002, most of the Company's efforts were expended on the exploration and maintenance of these claims. The Company's interests in the Quartz Mountain gold property and in its other properties, were acquired by direct purchase, lease, and option, or through joint ventures.

 

The Company sold the Quartz Mountain gold property during 2002, to Seabridge Resources Ltd. and Seabridge Resources Inc. (collectively "Seabridge"). Seabridge subsequently changed its name to Seabridge Gold Inc. At closing, Quartz Mountain received 300,000 Seabridge common shares, 200,000 Seabridge common share purchase warrants, US$100,000, and a 1% NSR from any future production on the Quartz Mountain gold property. The Seabridge warrants were exercised and all Seabridge common shares held by the Company have been sold. The Company sold its interest in the 1% NSR to Gold Royalty U.S. Corp. in February 2021.

 

 
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Following the sale of the Quartz Mountain gold property, the Company continued in its efforts to find a suitable mineral property for potential acquisition and exploration during the period of 2002 to 2011.

 

In December 2011, the Company acquired an option to earn a 100% interest in the Buck gold-silver property (the “Buck Project”) near the town of Houston in central British Columbia (“BC”). Concurrently with the Buck Project acquisition, the Company completed a $4.2 million private placement financing and began trading on the TSX-V. Exploration programs were carried out at Buck in 2011 and 2012, confirming targets. Difficult financing conditions for junior companies in 2013 necessitated that the Company limit its exploration expenditures and prioritize its property holdings. As a result, Quartz Mountain terminated its option on the Buck Project in July 2013.

 

In August 2012, the Company acquired 100% of the Galaxie copper-gold property (the “Galaxie Project”) in northwestern BC, and carried out exploration programs in 2012 at five new prospects within the property as well as at the Gnat porphyry copper deposit.

 

Quartz Mountain acquired the ZNT Project by utilizing British Columbia’s on-line mineral tenure system in 2012. The ZNT Project is located 15 kilometers southeast of the town of Smithers, British Columbia. Exploration in 2012 and 2013 has identified potential for the discovery of a bulk tonnage silver deposit at ZNT.

 

In November 2012, Quartz Mountain entered into an option and joint venture agreement with Amarc Resources Ltd. (“Amarc”) pursuant to which Amarc could earn a 40% ownership interest, with an option to acquire an additional 10% ownership interest, in the Galaxie and ZNT Projects. Amarc gained an initial 40% interest in the Galaxie and ZNT Projects by funding a drilling program at Gnat porphyry copper deposit at the Galaxie Project in late 2012. In June 2013, Quartz Mountain and Amarc entered into an amendment agreement through which Amarc had an option until October 31, 2013 to earn a 60% interest in each of the ZNT and Galaxie properties, by making certain property expenditures. Amarc earned a 60% interest in the ZNT Project but earned only a 40% interest in the Galaxie Project. In April 2014, Amarc terminated joint ventures with the Company and returned earned interests in the Galaxie and ZNT Projects in BC and Quartz Mountain owned 100% of the Galaxie and ZNT Projects.

 

After carrying out exploration in 2012 and 2013, the ZNT Project did not warrant further work. The mineral claims comprising the property were allowed to lapse subsequent to the year ended July 31, 2016.

 

Work was also conducted at the Galaxie Project in 2012 and 2013 but, largely because of the prevailing difficult market conditions for mineral exploration companies, the Company has since been unable to secure a joint venture or option agreement to further advance exploration. As a result, during the year ended July 31, 2016, three mineral claims were returned to a vendor and the remaining mineral claims comprising the property were allowed to lapse subsequent to year-end.

 

The Company continued to investigate new opportunities, and currently holds two mineral properties located in BC:

 

 

·

on June 8, 2021, the Company entered into a mineral claims purchase agreement to purchase nine mineral claims located near Houston, BC comprising the Maestro property; and

 

 

 

 

·

on November 5, 2021, the Company entered into a mineral claims purchase agreement to acquire 100% interest in four staked claims from United Mineral Services and obtained an additional option to purchase 100% of five adjacent claims owned by an arm’s length third party.  These nine mineral claims, are called the Jake Property, which is located 160 kilometers north of Smithers, BC

 

The Company does not have any operating revenue and anticipates that it will rely on sales of its equity securities in order to finance its acquisition and exploration activities.

 

 
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C. MINERAL PROPERTIES

 

The following information has been summarized from company files, in particular, the Company’s June 14, 2022 news release on the Maestro property and the Company’s July 9, 2022 news release on the Jake property. The disclosure has been reviewed by Farshad Shirmohammad, P.Geo., a qualified person.

 

Quartz Mountain currently holds the Jake and Maestro properties located in BC, Canada as shown on the map below.

 

qzm_20fimg6.jpg

   

Location and Infrastructure – Jake and Maestro Properties

(None of the mines or other projects shown on the map belongs to Quartz Mountain)

 

In British Columbia, the holder of a mineral claim is granted ownership of all subsurface minerals. A Free Miners Certificate is required to stake a new claim or to receive ownership or an interest in an existing claim. Mineral Titles in British Columbia are acquired and maintained via the Provincial Government’s “Mineral Titles Online” web site, which allows online, map-based claim staking. When a claimholder stakes a new claim, they have ownership of the claim for one year. To continue to hold the claims after one year a claimholder must perform technical or physical assessment work on the claims and file a report detailing the work and the results or pay cash in lieu of performing assessment work. The cost of the work performed and reported is applied to extend the expiry dates of the claims. The exploration expenditures required to maintain claims is $5/ha per year for years 1 and 2, $10/ha per year for years 3 and 4, $15/ha per year for years 5 and 6, and thereafter $20 per year. If a claimholder elects to pay cash in lieu the cost is twice that of required exploration expenditures.

 

Permits are required for any type of work that may disturb the surface or cause possible environmental damage to the land, including, but not limited to, the following:

 

 

·

Construction of roads or trails

 

 

 

 

·

Construction of drill sites or helipads

 

 

 

 

·

Construction of camps

 

 

 

 

·

Trenching

 

 
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One to five year exploration permits are issued by the BC government (Ministry of Energy, Mines and Low Carbon Innovation (“MEM”)) and overseen by regional offices after a Notice of Work is submitted to the government’s online portal. The permitting process requires several months to complete. A reclamation bond is required to be posted with the government of BC as part of the permitting process to pay for reclamation of surface disturbances in the event that a permittee defaults on their obligation to perform reclamation.

 

As exploration properties there are no buildings or equipment located on them; however, there is drill core stored by previous operators from historical work.

 

Jake Property

 

Property Description 

 

On November 5, 2021, the Company entered into a mineral claims purchase agreement with United Mineral Services Ltd. (“UMS”) to acquire 100% interest in the Jake mineral property consisted of four staked claims (the “Jake Property”) and obtained an additional option to purchase 100% of five adjacent claims owned by an arm’s length third party.

 

The total cash consideration the Company required to pay the vendor is $200,000 and to be paid out according to the following schedule: $50,000 immediately on the date of receipt of TSX Venture Exchange conditional approval of this transaction (“TSX-V Approval Date”); $50,000 on or before the date that is six months after the TSX-V Approval Date; $50,000 on or before the date that is twelve months after the TSX-V Approval Date and $50,000 on or before the date that is eighteen months after the TSX-V Approval Date. The Company will also be required to make payments of $125,000 over two years to the third party in connection with the additional option. In May 2022, the Company obtained the approval TSX Venture Exchange approval for this acquisition.

 

The Property consists of a single block of nine contiguous mineral claims that cover an area of approximately 2,374 ha. The mineral claims do not expire until September 2024.

 

Location and Infrastructure

 

The Jake Property is located 160 km north of Smithers in northwestern BC and. The property is accessible by helicopter and is close to logging roads leading to mining support towns of Smithers, Hazelton and Houston. Smithers is a hub location for BC Provincial Government services.

 

History

 

Mineral exploration work on the Jake Property dates back to 1965 and includes mapping, sampling, geophysics, trenching, backpack and diamond drilling, and road building. To date, two deposit target areas – Jake North and Jake South – have been identified. Noteworthy historical exploration work includes:

 

 

·

Kennco Exploration (Western) Ltd. (1965): two backpack drill holes totaling 55 m at Jake South.

 

 

 

 

·

Canadian Superior Exploration Ltd. (1968, 1971-1976): 12 diamond drill holes totaling 1,207 m at Jake North.

 

 

 

 

·

Cities Services Minerals Corporation (1977): two diamond drill holes totaling 436 m at Jake North, intersected grades of 0.19% Cu and 13-27.43 g/t Ag over 40 m.

 

 

 

 

·

QPX Minerals Inc. (1987): geological mapping and extensive property wide soil sampling confirmed copper, gold, molybdenum, silver, lead, zinc mineralization at Jake North and Jake South.

 

 

 

 

·

Teck Corporation (1997-1999): six diamond drill holes totaling 696 m at Jake North, intersecting high-grade silver and gold veins and copper-gold stockworks near intrusive/sediment contacts.

 

 
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In the period 2016 through 2020, UMS conducted an aerial magnetic survey and reinterpreted historical geochemical data over the entire Property and conducted geological mapping and sampling over Jake South.

 

qzm_20fimg7.jpg

   

Historical Soil Sample Results Over Magnetic Survey Results

(1st Vertical Derivative)

 

The magnetic target survey was flown at 200 m line spacing and provides excellent detail for interpreting the property geology. Results from the survey show several large magnetic highs, one associated with Cu+Au mineralization intersected in 1999 core drilling at Jake North by Teck Corporation (“Teck”). 

 

Geology The geology of Jake consists of Upper Jurassic Bowser Lake Group sedimentary rocks that are intersected by a series of north to northeast-trending monzonite dykes of the Tertiary Babine Plutonic Suite. Mineralization at the Jake Property is situated within a prominent gossan measuring 3.75 km long by 1.5 km wide.  Within the gossan is a series of north-northeast trending dyke swarms that intrude into sedimentary rocks.  The combination of results from historical and recent work has outlined a broadly altered and mineralized area comprising porphyry-style sulphide disseminations, and quartz-sulphide stockwork veins hosting Cu-Au±Mo mineralization. Within this are the Jake North and Jake South areas of interest with the potential for Cu+Au porphyry-type, as well as Au-Ag low-sulphidation epithermal and Ag-rich polymetallic vein deposits that warrant further testing.

 

Recent Work A consulting geologist who is a qualified person and geologists under his supervision visited the Jake Property on October 2, 2021. They reviewed data for the property before, during and after the site visit by reviewing and assessing the historical exploration literature including reports provided by the Company, annual reports, assessment reports and other reports from previous explorers on file with the MEM that detail work carried out in the Province from 1965 to 2020 that were compiled in a property report for the Company. Their work included verifying the ownership and expiry dates of mineral titles that comprise the Property, review of recent exploration results of work completed in 2020 for UMS, and auditing the results of 50 samples reported in the drilling database against original assay certificates attached to government assessment reports which describe previous work for prior operators of the property.

 

 
17

 

 

The only reported information that has been reported on sample preparation, analyses and security was for the talus fines and rock sampling conducted by UMS in 2020 and from work by Teck from 1997 to 1999. The talus fine and rock samples for the 2020 sampling program were analyzed at Activation Laboratories Ltd. ("Actlabs") in Kamloops, BC. Samples were analyzed for Au by fire assay with an ICP-MS finish (Actlabs method IA2-ICP) and for other elements utilizing an aqua regia digestion followed by ICP-MS analysis (Actlabs method Ultratrace 1). The sample preparation and any quality assurance/quality control ("QA/QC") protocols conducted during the analysis of these samples are not reported. For Teck's 1997 to 1999 exploration programs, including the 1999 drill program, Teck sent all samples to Eco-Tech laboratories of Kamloops, BC, but did not report any information on sample preparation, handling or QA/QC. During the site visit, drill core at the old Teck campsite at Jake North was examined. The Teck 1999 drill core was all intact and stored in a single pile.

 

The Company has received government approval for Induced Polarization (“IP”) surveys and core drilling.  Approximately 8.5 line-km of IP survey was completed on Jake’s high-priority targets during early July 2022. The Company is currently working on processing and modeling of the geophysical results to delineate drill targets at the next step of the exploration programs.

 

To date, no mineral processing or metallurgical testing has been carried out on mineralization from the Property. No mineral resource estimate has been undertaken for the Property mineralization as there is insufficient data to perform such an estimate.

 

Maestro Property

 

The following disclosure has been derived from the Company’s June 14, 2022 news release.

 

Property Description

 

On June 8, 2021, the Company entered into a mineral claims purchase agreement with an arms length third party to purchase nine mineral claims located near Houston, British Columbia for $105,000 in cash and 1,000,000 shares in the capital of the Company, subject to TSX Venture Exchange approval.

 

The claims are subject to a 2.5% NSR which can be bought-down to 1% for $1.5 million, and this NSR is subject to an annual advance payment of $25,000. There are no required work commitments for these claims as this transaction is not an option on the mineral claims.

 

The Maestro Property is comprised of ten mineral claims covering approximately 1,540 hectares. The Property consists of a single roughly square block of 10 contiguous mineral claims, with a window of a 5-cell claim internal to the north, and another window of a 4-cell claim to the southern part of the block held by other owners. All claims are 100% owned by Quartz Mountain.  Of the claims, two expire in 2024, two in 2026 and the remainder in 2027.

 

Location and Infrastructure

 

The Maestro Property is located in central British Columbia, 15 km north of Houston and 50 km south of Smithers. Highway 16 intersects the western edge of the Property, enabling easy access to nearby infrastructure including airports, railways, and power. The central region of the Property is accessible by numerous drill roads constructed by past operators.

 

 qzm_20fimg8.jpg

    

 Maestro Claims and Infrastructure

 

 
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History

 

The Maestro Property and surrounding area has over 100 years of mineral exploration history dating back to 1914; however, work has only been accurately recorded from the 1960’s onwards and includes mapping, sampling, geophysics, trenching, percussion, and diamond drilling.  Most of this work in and surrounding the Property focused on porphyry Mo±Cu mineralization for the Lone Pine Molybdenum Deposit, which lies immediately adjacent to the Maestro claims.  Because of the focus on the Lone Pine porphyry, the precious metal potential of the surrounding area has not been systematically explored. 

 

Notable historical drilling includes:

 

 

·

Molymines Exploration Ltd. (1965-1969): 128 percussion and diamond drill holes totaling 6,381 m at the Lone Pine Deposit and, to a lesser extent, the Prodigy Zone.

 

 

 

 

·

Granby Mining Corp. (1976-1978): 22 drill holes totaling 2,160 m at the Prodigy Zone, Granby Zone, and Mineral Hill Zone.

 

 

 

 

·

Dafrey Resources Inc. (1985): 12 percussions drill holes at the Lone Pine Deposit and the Prodigy Zone.

 

 

 

 

·

Southern Cross Gold (1987): Eight diamond drill holes totaling 521 m at the Lone Pine Deposit and the Prodigy Zone.

 

 

 

 

·

Bard Ventures Ltd. (2007-2011): 77 diamond drill holes totaling 35,334 m at the Lone Pine Deposit, Prodigy Zone, Granby Zone, and Mineral Hill Zone.

 

Geology

 

The geology of Maestro consists mainly of Lower to Middle Jurassic volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks from the Hazelton Group and, to a lesser amount, Upper Jurassic sedimentary rocks from the Bowser Lake Group.  Both Groups are intruded by stocks and dikes belonging to the Late Cretaceous Bulkley and Tertiary Goosly suites. The Maestro Property covers three known precious and base metal mineralized zones, named Prodigy, Granby and Mineral Hill.  These zones are outbound of the Lone Pine Molybdenum Deposit which is not on the property.

 

Recent Work

 

In 2021, Quartz Mountain conducted a 234 line-km airborne magnetic survey at Maestro, and re-logged 13 historical diamond drill holes from the Prodigy Zone that were drilled between 2007 and 2011 by Bard Ventures Ltd. Results from the re-logging suggest that there is a correlation of gold-bearing sulphide and sulphosalt mineralization in quartz-ankerite veins associated with quartz monzonitic intrusive rocks and with distinctive green sericite alteration of low magnetic susceptibility. This style of mineralization and alteration may extend outward from the precious metals-bearing zones identified in drilling at the Prodigy Zone, as suggested by the distribution of green sericite alteration identified in the re-logging, which appears to have increasing intensity of alteration south and westward. The zone remains open in both directions. The airborne magnetic survey (results shown on the map below) further revealed magnetic highs and linear magnetic lows that coincide with northwest-trending mapped intrusions and faults, respectively. Interestingly, the survey showed a large west-northwest trending oval-shaped magnetic high under a till-covered area, suggesting the presence of an undiscovered intrusion. Near the centre of this magnetic high is a distinct oval shaped magnetic low zone which correlates with the Prodigy Zone and warrants further testing.

 

 
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The results of a program of grid soil sampling and geochemical modeling, conducted in 2021-2022, are currently being finalized by the technical team to outline drill target areas for future exploration programs.

 

 qzm_20fimg9.jpg

   

Maestro Property 1st Vertical Derivative of Total Magnetic Intensity

 

In 2021, a consulting geologist who is a qualified person and a geologist under his supervision visited the Maestro Property on October 3, 2021. This team also verified the ownership and expiry dates of mineral titles that comprise the property as well as the exploration for the property before, during and after the site visit by reviewing and assessing the historical exploration literature, assessment and technical reports concerning the property and auditing the results of 100 samples reported in the drilling database against original assay certificates attached to assessment reports.

 

The results of a program of grid soil sampling and geochemical modeling, conducted in 2021-2022, are currently being finalized by the technical team to outline drill target areas for future exploration programs.

  

D. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

 

The Company operates in a single reportable operating segment – the acquisition, exploration, and development of mineral property interests. The Company is currently focused on the acquisition and exploration of mineral property interests in Canada, and conducts most of its business affairs through its Canadian parent entity.

 

The Company has two inactive wholly owned subsidiaries, QZMG Resources Ltd., a Nevada corporation who owns 100% interest in Wavecrest Resources Inc., a Delaware corporation.

 

E. PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

 

The Company has no material tangible fixed assets, such as mining equipment or plant facilities.

 

F. CURRENCY

 

All currency amounts in this Annual Report are stated in Canadian dollars unless otherwise indicated (see Item 3 for exchange rate information).

 

 
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ITEM 4A UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 5 OPERATING AND FINANCIAL REVIEW AND PROSPECTS OVERVIEW

 

Effective May 27, 2020, the Company completed a forward share split (the “Share Split”) on the basis of two additional common shares for every common share outstanding prior to the Share Split. Outstanding warrants were adjusted by the same share split ratio. All references to shares and per share amounts have been retroactively restated to give effect to the Share Split.

 

During fiscal 2020, the Company completed a private placement financing, a settlement of debt owed to a related party and forward share split.

 

The Company's financial statements are prepared on the basis that it will continue as a going concern. The Company has incurred losses since inception, and the ability of the Company to continue as a going concern depends upon its ability to continue to raise adequate financing and to develop profitable operations. Quartz Mountain's financial statements do not reflect adjustments, which could be material, to the carrying values of assets and liabilities, which may be required should the Company not be able to continue as a going concern.

 

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with the audited annual consolidated financial statements for the years ended July 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019 and the related notes accompanying this Annual Report. The Company prepares its financial statements in accordance with IFRS. The Company includes selected financial data prepared in compliance with IFRS without reconciliation to U.S. GAAP.

 

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES

 

The required disclosure is provided in note 2 of the accompanying audited financial statements as of and for the year ended July 31, 2022, which are presented in Exhibit 99.1 of this Annual Report on Form 20-F.

 

A. OPERATING RESULTS

 

Comprehensive income (loss) for the year ended July 31, 2022 vs. 2021

 

The Company recorded a loss from operations of $1,132,515 during the current fiscal year (2021 – income of $116,419). The loss incurred in fiscal 2022 was significantly higher compared to the the loss incurred in fiscal 2021 was due to increase level of exploration activities and the fair value of stock options ($399,140) recognized to equity settled share-based compensation.

 

The total amount of exploration and evaluation expenditures incurred in the current fiscal year was $514,132 (2021 - $90,907). As the Company has commenced exploration projects on the Maestro and Jake Properties during fiscal 2022, the total exploration and evaluation expenditures increased from prior year.

  

The following table provides a breakdown of the exploration and evaluation expenditures for the current and prior years:

     

Exploration and evaluation expenses

 

2022

 

 

2021

 

Assay and analysis

 

$33,918

 

 

$4,769

 

Drilling

 

 

22,455

 

 

 

-

 

Geological

 

 

243,507

 

 

 

37,478

 

Helicopter and fuel

 

 

55,120

 

 

 

29,520

 

Property costs and assessments

 

 

2,584

 

 

 

3,752

 

Site activities

 

 

140,198

 

 

 

13,381

 

Socioeconomic

 

 

4,997

 

 

 

-

 

Technical data

 

 

1,000

 

 

 

-

 

Travel and accommodation

 

 

10,352

 

 

 

2,007

 

Total

 

$514,132

 

 

$90,907

 

 

 
21

 

 

The total amount of general and administrative expenses increased in fiscal 2022 compared to that of fiscal 2021 due to increased level of corporate development activities.

    

The following table provides a breakdown of the administration costs incurred:

 

General and Administration costs

 

2022

 

 

2021

 

Administrative fees

 

$44,044

 

 

$38,382

 

Insurance

 

 

22,963

 

 

 

29,989

 

IT Services

 

 

11,000

 

 

 

12,000

 

Legal, accounting and audit

 

 

31,569

 

 

 

44,718

 

Office and miscellaneous

 

 

75,310

 

 

 

10,299

 

Regulatory, trust and filing

 

 

34,357

 

 

 

27,873

 

Total

 

$219,243

 

 

$163,261

 

      

Comprehensive income (loss) for the year ended July 31, 2021 vs. 2020

 

The Company recorded a loss from operations of $254,168 during the current fiscal year (2020 – income of $2,524,763). The loss incurred in fiscal 2021 as opposed to income in fiscal 2020 was due to the gain of $2,779,882 on debt settlement in fiscal 2020 which was a one-time event.

 

$90,907 of exploration and evaluation expenses costs were incurred during the year ended July 31, 2021 (2020 -nil). During fiscal 2021, the Company identified and focused on certain targeted projects in British Columbia, Canada which resulted in incurring the exploration and evaluation expenses in fiscal 2021.

 

The following table provides a breakdown of the exploration and evaluation expenses incurred:

 

Exploration and evaluation expenses

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

Assay and analysis

 

$4,769

 

 

$

 

Geological

 

 

37,478

 

 

 

 

Helicopter and fuel

 

 

29,520

 

 

 

 

Property costs and assessments

 

 

3,752

 

 

 

 

Site activities

 

 

13,381

 

 

 

 

Travel and accommodation

 

 

2,007

 

 

 

 

Total

 

$90,907

 

 

$

 

 

 
22

 

 

The following table provides a breakdown of the administration costs incurred:

 

General and Administration costs

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

Administrative fees

 

$38,382

 

 

$77,603

 

Insurance

 

 

29,989

 

 

 

35,730

 

IT Services

 

 

12,000

 

 

 

12,000

 

Legal, accounting and audit

 

 

31,910

 

 

 

29,885

 

Office and miscellaneous

 

 

10,299

 

 

 

1,572

 

Property investigation

 

 

 

 

 

23,275

 

Regulatory, trust and filing

 

 

27,873

 

 

 

64,233

 

Shareholder communications

 

 

 

 

 

5,144

 

Total

 

$163,261

 

 

$249,442

 

 

Administrative costs in 2021 were at similar level as 2020.

 

B. LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

   

The Company's primary source of funding is issuances of equity securities through private placements to sophisticated investors and institutions. The Company's continuing operations entirely depend upon its ability to obtain equity financings required to complete exploration and development of its projects, existence of economically recoverable mineral reserves at its projects, its ability to acquire necessary permits to explore or mine, future profitable production of any mine, and proceeds from disposition of its mineral property interests. These material uncertainties are indicative of significant doubt as to the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern.

     

At July 31, 2022, the Company had an accumulated deficit of $28,726,147 (2021 - $27,728,302) and has a working capital of $40,912 (2021 - $117,847).

 

In January 2016, the Company arranged with Hunter Dickinson Services Inc. (“HDSI”) to settle debt owing for services provided by HDSI whereby HDSI would forgive debt in the net amount owing at that time of $3,086,089, if the Company made a cash payment of $180,207 and issued 1,800,000 shares (pre- forward split basis of 600,000 shares) to HDSI. The TSX Venture Exchange approved the transaction with HDSI, the cash payment has been made, and issuance of the shares to HDSI was executed in December 2019. Additional debt or equity financing will be required to fund exploration or development programs. However, there can be no assurance that the Company will continue to obtain additional financial resources or that it will be able to achieve positive cash flows.

 

 
23

 

 

Financial market conditions for junior exploration companies have resulted in very depressed equity prices. A further and continued deterioration in market conditions will increase the cost of obtaining capital and significantly limit the availability of funds to the Company in the future. Accordingly, management is actively monitoring the effects of the current economic and financing conditions on the Company’s business and reviewing discretionary spending, capital projects and operating expenditures, and implementing cash and cash management strategies.

 

Capital Resources

 

The Company had no material commitments for capital expenditures as at July 31, 2022.

 

The Company has no lines of credit or other sources of financing which have been arranged but are as of yet, unused.

 

At July 31, 2022, there were no externally imposed capital requirements to which the Company is subject and with which the Company has not complied.

 

Requirement of Financing

 

The Company is in the process of assessing mineral property interests held by third parties for potential acquisition. The Company's continuing operations are entirely dependent upon the existence of economically recoverable mineral reserves, the ability of the Company to obtain the necessary financing to complete the exploration and development of these projects, obtaining the necessary permits to mine, on future profitable production of any mine and the proceeds from the disposition of the mineral property interests.

 

Additional debt or equity financing will be required to fund additional exploration programs. The Company has a reasonable expectation that additional funds will be available when necessary to meet ongoing exploration costs. However, there can be no assurance that the Company will continue to obtain additional financial resources and/or achieve profitability or positive cash flows, which raises substantial doubt on the ability of the Company to continue as a growing concern. If the Company is unable to obtain adequate additional financing, the Company will be required to re-evaluate its planned expenditures until additional funds can be raised through financing activities.

 

The Company has no "Purchase Obligations" defined as any agreement to purchase goods or services that is enforceable and legally binding on the Company that specifies all significant terms, including fixed or minimum quantities to be purchased; fixed, minimum or variable price provisions; and the approximate timing of the transaction.

 

C. RESEARCH EXPENDITURES

 

Quartz Mountain does not carry out any research or development activities. Please refer to Item 5A and Item 5B above for a discussion of the expenditures that the Company has incurred in connection with its business activities.

 

D. TREND INFORMATION

 

The Company does not currently hold any properties.

 

E. OFF – BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS

 

Quartz Mountain has no off-balance sheet arrangements.

 

 
24

 

 

F. TABULAR DISCLOSURE OF CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS

 

The following obligations existed at July 31, 2022:

 

 

 

Payments due by period

 

 

 

Total

 

 

Less than 1 year

 

 

1-5 years

 

 

After 5 years

 

Amounts payable and other liabilities

 

$188,135

 

 

$188,135

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

Due to a related party

 

 

102,820

 

 

 

102,820

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lease liability

 

 

41,333

 

 

 

8,580

 

 

 

32,753

 

 

 

 

Total

 

$332,288

 

 

$299,535

 

 

$32,753

 

 

$

 

 

The Company has no material capital lease or operating lease obligations. The Company has no "Purchase Obligations", defined as any agreement to purchase goods or services that is enforceable and legally binding on the Company that specifies all significant terms, including: fixed or minimum quantities to be purchased; fixed, minimum or variable price provisions; and the approximate timing of the transaction.

 

G. SAFE HARBOR

 

The safe harbor provided in Section 27A of the Securities Act and Section 21E of the Exchange Act applies to forward-looking information provided pursuant to Item 5E and Item 5F above.

 

ITEM 6 DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND EMPLOYEES

 

A. DIRECTORS AND SENIOR MANAGEMENT

 

Robert Dickinson, B.Sc., M.Sc. – Director, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

 

Robert Dickinson is an economic geologist who serves as a member of management of several mineral exploration companies, primarily those for whom Hunter Dickinson Services Inc. provides services. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree (Hons. Geology) and a Master of Science degree (Business Administration - Finance) from the University of British Columbia. Mr. Dickinson has been active in mineral exploration for over 45 years and was inducted into the Canadian Mining Hall of Fame in 2012. He is a director of Hunter Dickinson Services Inc. He is also President and Director of United Mineral Services Ltd., a private resource company.

     

Mr. Dickinson is, or was within the past five years, an officer and/or director of the following public companies:

      

Company

Positions Held

From

To

Amarc Resources Ltd.

Director

April 1993

Present

Chairman

April 2004

Present

Heatherdale Resources Ltd.

Director

November 2009

August 2020

Northcliff Resources Ltd.

Director

June 2011

Present

Northern Dynasty Minerals Ltd.

Director

June 1994

Present

Chairman

April 2004

Present

Quartz Mountain Resources Ltd.

Director

December 2011

February 2019

Director

May 2022

Present

Chairman

May 2022

Present

Chief Executive Officer

May 2022

Present

Taseko Mines Limited

Director

January 1991

Present

       

 
25

 

 

Leonie Tomlinson (1964) – Director and President

 

Leonie Tomlinson is a professional director and experienced business executive who over the course of her career has advised numerous private and public companies on investment structuring, corporate governance, financial reporting, HR matters, and exit strategy.

 

Ms. Tomlinson is, or was within the past five years, a director of the following public companies:

 

Company

Positions Held

From

To

Quartz Mountain Resources Ltd.

Director

December 2017

Present

President

May 2022

Present

 

Matthew Dickinson (1997) – Director

 

Matthew Dickinson is a recent McGill University graduate, where he studied Management of Information Systems and Computer Science. He is currently working as a Software Developer for Genesis Advanced Technology, a development stage industrial hardware company, and is consulting for Genesis Robotics where he builds software to support the firms commercialization efforts. Additionally he has background in early-stage venture financing and product strategy.

 

Mr. Dickinson is, or was within the past five years, a director of the following public companies:

 

Company

Positions Held

From

To

Quartz Mountain Resources Ltd.

Director

February 2019

Present

 

 
26

 

 

Trevor Thomas, LLB (1967), Corporate Secretary

 

Trevor Thomas has practiced in the areas of corporate commercial, corporate finance, securities and mining law since 1995, both in a private practice environment as well as in in-house positions and is currently general counsel for Hunter Dickinson Inc. (“HDI”). Prior to joining HDI, he served as in- house legal counsel with Placer Dome Inc. Mr. Thomas is, or was within the past five years, an officer or director of the following public companies:

 

Company

Positions Held

From

To

 

Amarc Resources Ltd.

 

Secretary

 

February 2008

 

Present

 

Electric Royalties Ltd.

 

Secretary

 

June 2020

 

November 2021

 

Heatherdale Resources Ltd.

 

Secretary

 

June 2013

 

August 2020

 

Mineral Mountain Resources Ltd.

 

Director

 

September 2016

 

Present

 

Northcliff Resources Ltd.

 

Secretary

 

June 2011

 

Present

 

Northern Dynasty Minerals Ltd.

 

Secretary

 

February 2008

 

Present

 

Quadro Resources Ltd.

 

Director

 

July 2017

 

Present

 

Quartz Mountain Resources Ltd.

 

Secretary

 

June 2013

 

Present

 

President and CEO

 

February 2019

 

May 2022

 

Rathdowney Resources Ltd.

 

Secretary

 

March 2011

 

Present

 

Re Royalties Ltd.

 

Secretary

 

November 2018

 

October 2022

 

Taseko Mines Limited

 

Secretary

 

July 2008

 

Present

 

Sebastian Tang, CPA CA (1976) – Chief Financial Officer

 

Sebastian Tang is Chartered Professional Accountant (CPA CA) with more than 15 years of professional experience in accountancy and financial reporting. He previously held positions with professional services firms Ernst & Young providing financial auditing services to companies in Asia and the Americas.

 

Company

Positions Held

From

To

 

Amarc Resources Ltd.

 

Chief Financial Officer

 

July 2020

 

September 2021

 

CAT Strategic Metals Corp.

 

Chief Financial Officer

 

September 2021

 

Present

 

Lucky Minerals Inc.

 

Chief Financial Officer

 

May 2019

 

March 2020

 

Global Hemp Group

 

Chief Financial Officer

 

May 2020

 

May 2022

 

B. COMPENSATION

 

During the Company's financial year ended July 31, 2022, the aggregate cash compensation paid or payable by the Company to its directors and senior officers was $17,771.

 

Trevor Thomas, Chairman, President, and CEO, and Sebastian Tang, CFO, are each "Named Executive Officers" of the Company for the purposes of the following disclosure.

 

The compensation paid to the Named Executive Officers during the Company's most recently completed financial year is as set out below:

 

 
27

 

 

During the fiscal year ended July 31, 2022, the above named NEOs did not serve the Company solely on a full-time basis, and their compensation from the Company is allocated based on the estimated amount of time spent providing services to the Company.

 

Name and principal position

Fiscal year

Salary

($)

Share-based awards

($)

Option based awards

($)

Pension value

($)

All other compensation

($)

Total compensation

($)

Robert Dickinson, CEO (1)

2022

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

2021

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

2020

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Trevor Thomas, CEO (1)

2022

            5,711

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

            5,711

2021

            3,375

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

            3,375

2020

            4,263

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

            4,263

Sebastian Tang, CFO (2)

2022

         12,000

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

         12,000

2021

         14,000

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

         14,000

Michael Lee, CFO (2)

2021

               975

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

               975

2020

         15,633

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

         15,633

 

Note (1) Mr. Dickinson replaced Mr. Thomas as Chairman and CEO on May 31, 2022.  Mr. Thomas remains as Corporate Secretary of the Company

 

Note (2) Mr. Tang replaced Mr. Lee as CFO on August 15, 2020

 

Director Compensation

 

The compensation provided to the directors, excluding a director who is already set out in disclosure for a NEO for the Company's most recently audited financial year ended July 31, 2022, is as set out below:

 

Name

Fees earned

(1)

($)

Share- based

awards

($)

Option

-based awards

($)

Non-equity incentive plan compensation

($)

Pension value

($)

All other compensation

($)

Total ($)

Leonie Tomlinson(2)

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Matthew Dickinson(2)

Nil

Nil

399,140

Nil

Nil

Nil

399,140

Trevor Thomas(2)

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

 

Notes:

 

(1) January 2016 and onward, fees were reduced to $nil.

 

(2) These directors are members of the Audit Committee and Nominating and Governance Committee.

 

Pension and Retirement Benefits

 

Neither the Company nor its subsidiary provides any pension, retirement, or similar benefits.

 

 
28

 

 

C. BOARD PRACTICES

 

On December 15, 2017, Ronald Thiessen resigned as President, CEO and Director, Robert Dickinson was appointed Quartz Mountain's Executive Chairman and CEO, and Rene Carrier and Leonie Tomlinson were appointed Directors of the Company. On February 15, 2019, Robert Dickinson resigned as Executive Chairman and CEO and Rene Carrier resigned as director. Trevor Thomas was appointed Chairman, President, and CEO, and Matthew Dickinson was appointed director. All directors have a term of office expiring at the next annual general meeting of the Company's shareholders. All officers have a term of office lasting until their removal or replacement by the Board of Directors. On May 31, 2022, Robert Dickinson replaced Trevor Thomas as Chairman and CEO, and Leonie Tomlinson replaced Trevor Thomas as President. In addition, on October 21, 2022 Albert Basile was appointed as a director (independent).

 

Directors Service Contracts

 

There is no written employment contract between the Company and any director.

 

There is no service contract between any director of the Company and either the Company or its subsidiary, which provides for any benefits upon termination of employment.

 

Audit Committee

 

Composition of Audit Committee

 

The members of the Audit Committee are Trevor Thomas, Matthew Dickinson, and Leonie Tomlinson (Chair).

 

Relevant Education and Experience

 

As a result of their education and experience, each member of the Audit has familiarity with, an understanding of, or experience in the accounting principles used by the Company to prepare its financial statements, and the ability to assess the general application of those principles in connection with estimates, accruals and reserves; reviewing or evaluating financial statements that present a breadth and level of complexity of accounting issues that are generally comparable to the breadth and complexity of issues that can reasonably be expected to be raised by the Company's financial statements; and an understanding of internal controls and procedures for financial reporting.

Ms. Tomlinson is an experienced businessperson with corporate finance experience. See disclosure

under “A. Directors and Senior Management” above.

 

 Audit Committee’s Charter

 

The function of the Audit Committee is to oversee the employment and compensation of the Company’s independent auditor, and other matters under the authority of the Committee. The Committee also assists the Board of Directors in carrying out its oversight responsibilities relating to the Company’s financial, accounting, and reporting processes, the Company’s system of internal accounting and financial controls, the Company’s compliance with related legal and regulatory requirements, and the fairness of transactions between the Company and related parties.

 

The Audit Committee has a charter that sets out its mandate and responsibilities, which is contained in Appendix 6 of the Corporate Governance Policies and Procedures Manual (available for download from the Company’s website under Corporate Governance at www.quartzmountainresources.com). The Audit Committee has the following responsibilities and authority:

 

Relationship with Independent Auditor

 

Subject to the law of British Columbia as to the role of the Shareholders in the appointment of independent auditors, the Committee shall have the sole authority to appoint or replace the independent auditor.

 

The Committee shall be directly responsible for the compensation and oversight of the work of the independent auditor (including resolution of disagreements between management and the independent auditor regarding financial reporting) for the purpose of preparing or issuing an audit report or related work.

 

The independent auditor shall report directly to the Committee.

 

 
29

 

 

The Committee shall approve in advance all audit and permitted non-audit services with the independent auditor, including the terms of the engagements and the fees payable; provided that the Committee Chairman may approve services to be performed by the independent auditor between Committee meetings if the amount of the fee does not exceed $50,000, provided that any such approval shall be reported to the Committee at the next meeting thereof. The Committee may delegate to a subcommittee the authority to grant pre-approvals of audit and permitted non-audit services, provided that the decision of any such subcommittee shall be presented to the full Committee at its next scheduled meeting.

 

At least annually, the Committee shall review and evaluate the experience and qualifications of the lead partner and senior members of the independent auditor team.

 

At least annually, the Committee shall obtain and review a report from the independent auditor regarding:

 

 

·

the independent auditor’s internal quality-control procedures;

 

·

any material issues raised by the most recent internal quality-control review, or peer review, of the auditor, or by any inquiry or investigation by governmental or professional authorities within the preceding five years respecting one or more independent audits carried out by the firm;

 

·

any steps taken to deal with any such issues; and

 

·

all relationships between the independent auditor and the Company.

 

At least annually, the Committee shall evaluate the qualifications, performance, and independence of the independent auditor, including considering whether the auditor’s quality controls are adequate and the provision of permitted non-audit services is compatible with maintaining the auditor’s independence.

 

The Committee shall ensure the rotation of the lead (or coordinating) audit partner having primary responsibility for the audit, the concurring partner responsible for reviewing the audit, and other audit partners as required by law.

 

The Committee shall consider whether, in order to assure continuing auditor independence, it is appropriate to adopt a policy of rotating the independent auditing firm on a regular basis.

 

The Committee shall recommend to the Board policies for the Company’s hiring of employees or former employees of the independent auditor who were engaged on the Company’s account or participated in any capacity in the audit of the Company.

 

The Committee shall oversee the implementation by management of appropriate information technology systems for the Company, including as required for proper financial reporting and compliance.

 

Financial Statement and Disclosure Review

 

The Committee shall review and discuss with management and the independent auditor the annual audited financial statements, including disclosures made in management’s discussion and analysis, and recommend to the Board whether the audited financial statements should be filed with applicable securities regulatory authorities and included in the Company’s annual reports.

 

The Committee shall review and discuss with management (and, to the extent the Committee deems it necessary or appropriate, the independent auditor) the Company’s quarterly financial statements, including disclosures made in management’s discussion and analysis, and recommend to the Board whether such financial statements should be filed with applicable securities regulatory authorities.

 

The Committee shall review and discuss with management and the independent auditor significant financial reporting issues and judgments made in connection with the preparation of the Company’s financial statements, including the independent auditor’s assessment of the quality of the Company’s accounting principles, any significant changes in the Company’s selection or application of accounting principles, any major issues as to the adequacy of the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting, and any special steps adopted in light of material control deficiencies.

 

At least annually and prior to the publication of annual audited financial statements, the Committee shall review and discuss with management and the independent auditor a report from the independent auditor on:

 

 

·

all critical accounting policies and practices used by the Company;

 

·

all alternative accounting treatments of financial information that have been discussed with management since the prior report, ramifications of the use of such alternative disclosures and treatments, the treatment preferred by the independent auditor, and an explanation of why the independent auditor’s preferred method was not adopted; and,

 

·

other material written communications between the independent auditor and management since the prior report, such as any management letter or schedule of unadjusted differences, the development, selection and disclosure of critical accounting estimates, and analyses of the effect of alternative assumptions, estimates or GAAP methods on the Company’s financial statements.

 

Prior to their filing or issuance, the Committee shall review the Company’s Annual Information Form, quarterly and annual earnings press releases, and other financial press releases, including the use of “pro forma” or “adjusted” non-GAAP information.

 

 
30

 

 

The Committee shall review and discuss with management the financial information and earnings guidance provided to analysts and rating agencies. Such discussion may be specific or it may be in general regarding the types of information to be disclosed and the types of presentations to be made.

 

Conduct of the Annual Audit

 

The Committee shall oversee the annual audit, and in the course of such oversight, the Committee shall have the following responsibilities and authority:

 

The Committee shall meet with the independent auditor prior to the audit to discuss the planning and conduct of the annual audit, and shall meet with the independent auditor as may be necessary or appropriate in connection with the audit.

 

The Committee shall ascertain that the independent auditor is registered and in good standing with the Canadian Public Accounting Board and that the independent auditor satisfies all applicable independence standards. The Committee shall obtain from the auditor a written statement delineating all relationships between the auditor and the Company as per applicable independence standards, and review relationships that may impact the objectivity and independence of the auditor.

 

The Committee shall discuss with the independent auditor the matters required to be discussed by Statement on Auditing Standards No. 61 relating to the conduct of the audit, including:

 

 

·

the adoption of, or changes to, the Company’s significant auditing and accounting principles and practices as suggested by the independent auditor, internal auditors or management;

 

·

the management letter provided by the independent auditor and the Company’s response to that letter; and

 

·

any difficulties encountered in the course of the audit work, including any restrictions on the scope of activities or access to requested information, and any significant disagreements with management.

 

The Committee shall make such inquiries to the management and the independent auditor as the Committee members deem necessary or appropriate to satisfy themselves regarding the efficacy of the Company’s financial and internal controls and procedures and the auditing process.

 

Compliance and Oversight

 

The Committee shall meet periodically with management and the independent auditor in separate executive sessions. The Committee may also, to the extent it deems necessary or appropriate, meet with the Company’s investment bankers and financial analysts who follow the Company.

 

The Committee shall discuss with management and the independent auditor the effect of regulatory and accounting initiatives as well as off-balance sheet structures on the Company’s financial statements.

 

The Committee shall discuss with management the Company’s major financial risk exposures and the steps management has taken to monitor and control such exposures, including the Company’s risk assessment and risk management policies, and regularly review the top risks identified by management and the policies and practices adopted by the Company to mitigate those risks.

 

If required, the Committee shall annually review with management and the independent auditor the disclosure controls and procedures and confirm that the Company (with CEO and CFO participation) has evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of the controls within 90 days prior to the date of filing of the AIF. The Committee also shall review with management and the independent auditor any deficiencies in the design and operation of internal controls and significant deficiencies or material weaknesses therein, and any fraud involving management or other employees who have a significant role in the Company’s internal controls. As a part of that review, the Committee shall review the process followed in preparing and verifying the accuracy of the required CEO and CFO annual certifications.

 

If required, the Committee shall annually review management’s internal control report and the independent auditor’s assessment of the internal controls and procedures prior to the filing of the AIF.

 

The Committee shall establish procedures for the receipt, retention and treatment of complaints received by the Company regarding accounting, internal accounting controls or auditing matters, and the confidential, anonymous submission by employees of concerns regarding questionable accounting or auditing matters.

 

The Committee shall discuss with management and the independent auditor any correspondence with regulators or governmental agencies and any employee complaints or reports that raise material issues regarding the Company’s financial statements or accounting policies.

 

At least annually, the Committee shall meet with the Company’s legal counsel and discuss any legal matters that may have a material impact on the financial statements or the Company’s compliance policies.

 

 
31

 

 

The Committee shall oversee the preparation of reports relating to the Audit Committee as required under applicable laws, regulations, and stock exchange requirements.

 

The Committee shall exercise oversight with respect to anti-fraud programs and controls.

 

Related Party Transactions

 

The Committee shall review for fairness to the Company proposed transactions, contracts and other arrangements between the Company and its subsidiaries and any related party or affiliate, and make recommendations to the Board whether any such transactions, contracts and other arrangements should be approved or continued. The foregoing shall not include any compensation payable pursuant to any plan, program, contract, or arrangement subject to the authority of the Company’s Compensation Committee.

 

As used herein the term “related party” means any officer or director of the Company or any subsidiary, or any shareholder holding a greater than 10% direct or indirect financial or voting interest in the Company, and the term “affiliate” means any person, whether acting alone or in concert with others, that has the power to exercise a controlling influence over the Company and its subsidiaries. "Related party" includes HDSI.

 

D. EMPLOYEES

 

At November 25, 2022, the Company had no employees and had contracted staff on an as-needed basis. The directors of the Company primarily administer the Company's functions through the employees of HDSI, a private company with certain directors in common with the Company (see Item 7 – "Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions").

 

E. SHARE OWNERSHIP

 

Security Holdings of Directors and Senior Management

 

As at November 25, 2022, the directors and officers of Quartz Mountain and their respective affiliates, directly and indirectly, own or control as a group an aggregate of 29,797,230 common shares or 67.93%.

 

As at November 25, 2022, the Company's directors and officers beneficially own the following number of the Company's common shares:

 

Name of Insider

Securities Beneficially Owned

As a % of outstanding common

shares

Robert Dickinson

 23,068,184(Common Shares owned directly), 750,000 (Common Shares held by United Mineral Services Ltd.), 1,250,000 (Share purchase warrants owned directly), 750,000 (Share purchase warrants held by United Mineral Services Ltd.)

54.30%

Matthew Dickinson

 5,978,546(Common Shares), 2,100,000 (Share purchase options), 750,000 (Share purchase warrants)

13.63%

Sebastian Tang

Nil

Nil

Trevor Thomas

500 (Common Share)

Nil

Leonie Tomlinson

Nil

Nil

 

 
32

 

 

ITEM 7 MAJOR SHAREHOLDERS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

A. MAJOR SHAREHOLDERS

 

Quartz Mountain is a publicly held corporation, with its shares held by residents of Canada, the United States of America and other countries. To the best of Quartz Mountain's knowledge, person, corporation, or other entity beneficially owns, directly or indirectly, or controls more than 5% of the common shares of Quartz Mountain, the only class of securities with voting rights are disclosed in the table below. For these purposes, "beneficial ownership" means the sole or shared power to vote or direct the voting or to dispose or direct the disposition of any security.

 

As of November 25, 2022, Quartz Mountain had authorized unlimited common shares without par value, of which 43,864,141 were issued and outstanding. The following table sets forth certain information with respect to beneficial ownership of the Company's common stock as of November 25, 2022, by each shareholder known to be the beneficial owner of more than 5% of the common stock.

 

Identity of Person or Group

Shares

Percentage Beneficially Owned of Class

Robert A. Dickinson

23,818,184

54.30.%

Matthew Dickinson

5,978,546

13.63%

Hunter Dickinson Services Inc.

1,800,000

4.10%

 

All of the common shares have the same voting rights and no major shareholders of the Company have different voting rights.

 

Geographic Breakdown of Shareholders

 

As of November 25, 2022, Quartz Mountain's register of shareholders indicates that Quartz Mountain's common shares are held as follows:

 

 

Location

 

Number of registered shareholders of record

 

Number of shares

 

Percentage of total

shares

 

Canada

 

151

 

43,420,852

 

98.99%

 

United States

 

1,464

 

431,724

 

0,98%

 

Other

 

13

 

11,565

 

0.03%

 

Total

 

1,628

 

43,864,141

 

100%

 

Shares registered in the names of intermediaries, were assumed to be held by residents of the same country in which the intermediary is located.

 

Transfer Agent

 

The Company's common shares are recorded on the books of its transfer agent, Computershare Investor Services Inc., located at 4th Floor, 510 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6C 3B9; telephone (604) 661-9400 in registered form. However, the majority of the Company's common shares are registered in the name of intermediaries such as brokerage houses and clearinghouses (on behalf of their respective brokerage clients). Quartz Mountain does not have knowledge or access to the identities of the beneficial owners of such shares registered through intermediaries.

 

Control

 

To the best of its knowledge, the Company is not owned or controlled, directly or indirectly, by any other corporation, by any foreign government or by any other natural or legal person, severally or jointly, other than as noted above under Major Shareholders. There are no arrangements known to Quartz Mountain, which, at a subsequent date, may result in a change in control of the Company.

 

Insider Reports under the Securities Acts of British Columbia, Alberta and Ontario

 

Since the Company is a reporting issuer under the Securities Acts of British Columbia, Alberta and Ontario, certain "insiders" of the Company (including its directors, certain executive officers, and persons who directly or indirectly beneficially own, control or direct more than 10% of its common shares) are generally required to file insider reports of changes in their ownership of Quartz Mountain's common shares within five days following the trade under National Instrument 55-104 – Insider Reporting Requirements and Exemptions, as adopted by the CSA, and the Securities Act (Ontario). Copies of such reports are available for public inspection at the offices of the British Columbia Securities Commission, ninth Floor, 701 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V7Y 1L2, (604) 899-6500 or at the British Columbia Securities Commission web site, www.bcsc.bc.ca. In British Columbia, all insider reports must be filed electronically five days following the date of the trade at www.sedi.ca. The public is able to access these reports at www.sedi.ca.

 

 
33

 

 

B. RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

Except as disclosed herein, since the beginning of its last fiscal year ended July 31, 2022, Quartz Mountain has not:

 

(1)

entered into any transactions which are material to Quartz Mountain, or a related party or any transactions unusual in their nature or conditions involving goods, services or tangible or intangible assets to which Quartz Mountain or any of its former subsidiaries was a party;

 

 

(2)

entered into any transactions or loans between the Company and:

 

 

(a)

enterprises that directly or indirectly through one or more intermediaries, control or are controlled by, or are under common control with, Quartz Mountain;

 

 

 

 

(b)

associates of Quartz Mountain (unconsolidated enterprises in which Quartz Mountain has significant influence or which has significant influence over Quartz Mountain) including shareholders beneficially owning 10% or more of the outstanding shares of Quartz Mountain;

 

 

 

 

(c)

individuals owning, directly or indirectly, an interest in the common shares of Quartz Mountain that gives them significant influence over Quartz Mountain, and close members of any such individual’s family;

 

 

 

 

(d)

key management personnel (persons having authority in responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of Quartz Mountain including directors and senior management and close members of such individuals’ families); or

 

 

 

 

(e)

enterprises in which a substantial voting interest is owned, directly or indirectly, by any person described in (c) or (d) or over which such a person is able to exercise significant influence.

 

HDSI

 

HDI and its wholly-owned subsidiary HDSI are private companies established by a group of mining professionals. HDSI provides contract services for a number of mineral exploration and development companies, and also to companies that are outside of the mining and mineral development space. The Company acquires services from a number of related and arms‐length contractors, and it is at the Company’s discretion that HDSI provides certain contract services.

 

The Company’s Chief Executive Officer and Chairman, and Corporate Secretary are employees of HDSI and are contracted to work for the Company under an employee secondment agreement between the Company and HDSI.

 

Pursuant to an agreement dated June 1, 2008, HDSI provides certain cost effective technical, geological, corporate communications, regulatory compliance, and administrative and management services to the Company, on a non‐exclusive basis as needed and as requested by the Company. Because of this relationship, the Company has ready access to a range of diverse and specialized expertise on a regular basis, without having to engage or hire full‐time employees or experts. The Company benefits from the economies of scale created by HDSI, which itself serves several clients both within and external to the exploration and mining sector.

 

The Company is not obligated to acquire any minimum amount of services from HDSI. The monetary amount of the services received from HDSI in a given period of time is a function of annually set and agreed charge‐out rates for and the time spent by each HDSI employee engaged by the Company.

 

HDSI also incurs third party costs on behalf of the Company. Such third party costs include, for example, travel, conferences, and communication services. Third‐ party costs are billed at cost, without markup.

 

There are no ongoing contractual or other commitments resulting from the Company's transactions with HDSI, other than the payment for services already rendered and billed. The agreement may be terminated upon 60 days' notice by either the Company or HDSI.

During the fiscal year ended July 31, 2022, the Company had transactions totaling $83,241 (2021 – $61,873; 2020 – $104,678) to HDSI for services and reimbursements of third party disbursements pursuant to this agreement.

 

In January 2016, the Company and HDSI reached a settlement agreement whereby HDSI agreed to forgive the balance due to HDSI in the net amount of $3,086,089 if the Company completes the following:

 

·

makes a cash payment of $180,207; and

 

 

·

issues 1,800,000 shares (pre-forward split basis of 600,000 shares) valued at $126,000.

 

The cash payment of $180,207 was paid during the year ended July 31, 2018 and the shares were issued to HDSI during the year ended July 31, 2020, completing the settlement and resulting in a gain on settlement of debt of $2,779,882.

 

United Mineral Services Inc. ("UMS")

 

In December 2018, the Company entered into a loan agreement with United Mineral Services Ltd. (the “Lender”), a company owned by a former director, pursuant to which the Lender advanced to the Company a principal sum of $100,000 with a six-month term, at an interest rate of 10% per annum calculated monthly and payable quarterly. The principal amount and related interest were repaid during the year ended July 31, 2020.

 

The Company has entered into an agreement with UMS dated November 5, 2021 in connection with the acquisition of the Jake Property. UMS is controlled by Robert Dickinson, who is a significant shareholder of the Company. See Item 4 (c) Mineral Properties above.

 

C. INTERESTS OF EXPERTS AND COUNSEL

 

Not applicable.

 

 
34

 

 

ITEM 8 FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

A. CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Quartz Mountain's audited consolidated annual financial statements as at and for the year ended July 31, 2022, 2021 and 2020 are attached in Exhibit 99.1 to this Annual Report.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

The Company is not, and has not been in the recent past, involved in any legal or arbitration proceedings, including governmental proceedings and those relating to bankruptcy, receivership, or similar proceedings.

 

Dividend Policy

 

The Company has not paid any dividends on its outstanding common shares since its incorporation and does not anticipate that it will do so in the foreseeable future. All funds of the Company are being retained for administration expenses and mineral property investigations.

 

B. SIGNIFICANT CHANGES

 

There have been no significant changes to the accompanying financial statements, except as disclosed in this Annual Report on Form 20-F.

 

ITEM 9 THE OFFER AND LISTING

 

A. OFFER AND LISTING DETAILS Trading Markets

 

The following tables set forth for the periods indicated the price history, rounded to nearest cent, of the Company's common shares on the TSX-V and on the OTC Grey Market:

 

 

 TSX-V

 OTC

Fiscal year ended July 31

High (CDN$)

Low (CDN$)

High (US$)

Low (US$)

2022

0.39

0.18

0.29

0.00

2021

0.31

0.12

0.19

0.10

2020

0.45

0.05

0.23

0.04

2019

0.27

0.09

0.23

0.08

2018

0.50

0.22

0.40

0.00

2017

0.04

0.13

0.23

0.07

2016

0.13

0.13

0.13

0.13

 

 
35

 

 

 

 TSX-V

 OTC

Fiscal Quarter

High (CDN$)

Low (CDN$)

High (US$)

Low (US$)

Q4, 2022

0.29

0.21

0.25

0.02

Q3, 2022

0.39

0.23

0.26

0.17

Q2, 2022

0.25

0.18

0.20

0.16

Q1, 2022

0.36

0.20

0.29

0.00

Q4, 2021

0.31

0.16

0.18

0.13

Q3, 2021

0.28

0.12

0.19

0.10

Q2, 2021

0.22

0.14

0.11

0.11

Q1, 2021

0.20

0.13

0.15

0.10

 

 

 TSX-V

 OTC

Month

High (CDN$)

Low (CDN$)

High (US$)

Low (US$)

October 2022

0.25

0.20

0.03

0.03

September 2022

0.27

0.20

0.21

0.03

August 2022

0.25

0.21

0.21

0.03

July 2022

0.25

0.21

0.22

0.02

June 2022

0.28

0.23

0.25

0.19

May 2022

0.29

0.23

0.25

0.25

 

B. PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION

 

Not applicable.

 

C. MARKETS

 

On December 30, 2011, the Company acquired a qualifying property and was relisted on the main board of the TSX Venture Exchange, trading under the symbol QZM. The Company continues to trade on the OTC Grey Market under the symbol QZMRF.

 

On February 17, 2005, the Company transferred its listing to NEX, a separate board of TSX-V and the Company's common shares traded on NEX under the symbol QZM.H.

 

Prior to February 17, 2005, the Company's common shares were listed and traded in Canada on Tier 2 on the TSX-V, under the symbol QZM.V. The transition to Tier 2 became effective December 23, 2003. Prior to this, the Company traded on Tier 3 on the TSX-V.

 

D. SELLING SHAREHOLDERS

 

Not applicable.

 

E. DILUTION

 

Not applicable.

 

 
36

 

 

F. EXPENSES OF THE ISSUE

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 10 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

 

A. SHARE CAPITAL

 

Not applicable.

 

B. MEMORANDUM AND ARTICLES OF ASSOCIATION Articles of Association

 

Quartz Mountain's original corporate constituting documents comprised of the Memorandum and Articles of Association were registered with the British Columbia Registrar of Companies under Corporation No. BC0253743. The Company’s Memorandum and Articles have subsequently been replaced by a Notice of Articles and Articles under the Business Corporations Act (British Columbia) (“BCA”), and the Articles were last amended by shareholder resolution at the Company’s Annual General Meeting, held on February 24, 2014. The Company's articles of incorporation do not contain a description or place any restrictions on the Company's objects and purposes. For more information, see the Articles of Amalgamation filed as Exhibit 10.1 to this Form 20-F.

 

Certain Powers of Directors

 

The Company’s articles require that a director or senior officer who holds any office or possesses any property, right or interest that could result, directly or indirectly, in the creation of a duty or interest that materially conflicts with that individual’s duty or interest as a director or senior officer, must disclose the nature and extent of the conflict as required by the BCA.

 

The BCA requires that every director or senior officer who is a party to, or who is a director or officer of, or has a material interest in, any person who is a party to, a material contract or transaction or a proposed material contract or transaction with the Company, must disclose in writing to the Company or request to have entered in the minutes of a meeting or a consent resolution of directors, the nature and extent of his or her interest, and must refrain from voting in respect of the contract or transaction, unless the contract or transaction is: (a) one relating primarily to his or her remuneration as a director of the corporation or an affiliate; (b) one for indemnity of or insurance for directors as contemplated under the BCA; or (c) one with an affiliate of the Company. However, a director who is prohibited by the BCA from voting on a material contract or proposed material contract may be counted in determining whether a quorum is present for the purpose of the resolution, if the director disclosed his or her interest in accordance with the BCA and the contract or transaction was reasonable and fair to the corporation at the time it was approved.

 

The Company's Articles provide that the Board will from time to time determine the remuneration to be paid to the directors. The Company must reimburse each director for the reasonable expenses that he or she may incur in and about the business of the Company. The Board may also, by resolution, award special remuneration to any director for undertaking any professional or other services on the Company's behalf, outside than the ordinary duties of a director of the Company.

 

The Company's Articles provide that the directors may: (a) borrow money in the manner and amount, on the security, from the sources and on the terms and conditions that they consider appropriate; (b) issue bonds, debentures and other debt obligations either outright or as security for any liability or obligation of the Company or any other person and at such discounts or premiums and on such other terms as the directors consider appropriate; (c) guarantee the repayment of money by any other person or the performance of any obligation of any other person; and (d) mortgage, charge, whether by way of specific or floating charge, grant a security interest in, or give other security on, the whole or any part of the present and future assets and undertaking of the Company.

 

The directors may, by resolution, amend or repeal any articles that regulate the business or affairs of the Company. The BCA requires the directors to submit any such amendment or repeal to the Company's shareholders at the next meeting of shareholders, and the shareholders may confirm, reject, or amend the amendment or repeal.

 

The Board does not have a mandatory retirement policy for directors based solely on age. The Company has a practice of conducting annual Board, Committee, and individual director evaluations, pursuant to which each director's performance is evaluated annually. There is no minimum share ownership requirement for director’s qualification.

 

 
37

 

 

Authorized Share Capital

 

The Company's authorized share capital consists of an unlimited number of common shares without par value, and an unlimited number of preferred shares without par value.

 

All outstanding common shares of the Company are fully paid and non-assessable. The holders of the common shares are entitled to one vote per share at meetings of shareholders and to receive dividends if, as, and when declared by the directors of the Company. In the event of voluntary or involuntary liquidation, dissolution or winding-up of the Company, after payment of all outstanding debts, the remaining assets of the Company available for distribution would be distributed ratably to the holders of the common shares. Holders of the common shares of the Company have no pre- emptive, redemption, exchange, or conversion rights.

 

The preferred shares may be issued in series on such terms as determined by the Company's directors in accordance with the class rights and restrictions. The special rights and restrictions attaching to the preferred shares are set forth in Part 26 of the Articles, and provide the directors with wide latitude to create a series of preferred shares which may be convertible into common shares, and have attached to them rights that rank ahead of common shares in respect of entitlement to dividends. The directors may, by resolution, create, define, and attach special rights and restrictions to the shares of each series, subject to the special rights and restrictions attached to the preferred shares.

 

Except as described above, the Company may not create any class or series of shares or make any modification to the provisions attaching to the Company's shares without the affirmative vote of a majority of the votes cast by the holders of the common shares.

 

Majority Voting Policy

 

Under the Company’s Corporate Governance Manual, in an uncontested director election, if the votes “for” the election of a director nominee at a meeting of shareholders are fewer than the number voted “withhold”, the nominee is expected to submit his or her resignation promptly after the meeting for the consideration of the Nominating and Governance Committee. The Nominating and Governance Committee will make a recommendation to the Board of Directors after reviewing the matter, and the Board of Directors will then decide whether to accept or reject the resignation. The Board’s decision to accept or reject the resignation will be disclosed to shareholders. The nominee will not participate in any Nominating and Governance Committee deliberations whether to accept or reject the resignation.

 

Meetings of Shareholders

 

The BCA requires the Company to call an annual shareholders' meeting not later than 15 months after holding the last preceding annual meeting and permits the Company to call a special shareholders' meeting at any time. In addition, in accordance with the BCA, the holders of not less than 5% of the Company's shares carrying the right to vote at a meeting sought to be held may requisition the directors to call a special shareholders' meeting for the purposes stated in the requisition. The Company is required to mail a notice of meeting and management information circular to registered shareholders not less than 21 days and not more than 2 months prior to the date of any annual or special shareholders' meeting. These materials are also filed with Canadian securities regulatory authorities and furnished to the SEC. The Company's articles provide that a quorum of two shareholders in person or represented by proxy holding or representing by proxy at least 10% of the Company's issued shares carrying the right to vote at the meeting is required to transact business at a shareholders' meeting. In addition to shareholders and their duly appointed proxies and corporate representatives, the Company's directors, president, secretary, lawyers, auditors, and invitees of the directors or chairperson, are entitled to be admitted to the Company's annual and special shareholders' meetings; provided that any such person is not to be counted in the quorum and is not entitled to vote at the meeting unless that person is a shareholder or proxy holder entitled to vote at the meeting.

 

Disclosure of Share Ownership

 

The Securities Act (British Columbia) currently provides that the directors and certain officers of an issuer and its subsidiaries and any person or company that beneficially owns, directly or indirectly, voting securities of an issuer or that exercises control or direction over voting securities of an issuer or a combination of both, carrying more than 10% of the voting rights attached to all the issuer's outstanding voting securities (a "significant shareholder"), as well as the directors and officers of any significant shareholder, (each an "insider") must, within 10 days of becoming an insider, file a report in the required form effective the date on which the person became an insider, disclosing any direct or indirect beneficial ownership of, or control or direction over, securities of the reporting issuer. The Securities Act (British Columbia) also provides for the filing of a report by an insider of a reporting issuer who acquires or transfers securities of the issuer or who enters into, materially amends or terminates an arrangement the effect of which is to alter the insider's economic interest in a security of the issuer or the insider's economic exposure to the issuer. These reports must be filed within five days after the reportable event. The Securities Act (British Columbia) also requires these reports to be filed by reporting insiders within five days after the applicable event, though are only required by the Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Chief Operating Officer, directors, any person or company responsible for a principal business unit and significant shareholders of the Company.

 

 
38

 

 

The Securities Act (British Columbia) also provides that a person or company that acquires (whether or not by way of a take-over bid, offer to acquire or subscription from treasury) beneficial ownership of voting or equity securities or securities convertible into voting or equity securities of a reporting issuer that, together with previously held securities brings the total holdings of such holder to 10% or more of the outstanding securities of that class, must (a) issue and file forthwith a news release containing certain prescribed information and (b) file a report within two business days containing the same information set out in the news release. The acquiring person or company must also issue a news release and file a report each time it acquires, in the aggregate, an additional 2% or more of the outstanding securities of the same class and every time there is a change to any material fact in the news release and report previously issued and filed.

 

The rules in the United States governing the ownership threshold above which shareholder ownership must be disclosed are more stringent than those discussed above. Section 13(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act"), imposes reporting requirements on persons who acquire beneficial ownership (as such term is defined in Rule 13d-3 under the Exchange Act) of more than 5% of a class of an equity security registered under Section 12 of the Exchange Act. In general, such persons must file, within ten days after such acquisition, a report of beneficial ownership with the SEC containing the information prescribed by the regulations under Section 13(d) of the Exchange Act and promptly file an amendment to such report to disclose any material change to the information reported, including any acquisition or disposition of 1% or more of the outstanding securities of the registered class. Certain institutional investors that acquire shares in the ordinary course of business and not with the purpose or with the effect of changing or influencing the control of the issuer are subject to lesser disclosure obligations.

 

C. MATERIAL CONTRACTS

 

Quartz Mountain's material contracts as of November 25, 2022, are:

 

 

·

Corporate Services Agreement with HDSI, dated for reference July 2, 2010. See Item 7B;

 

D. EXCHANGE CONTROLS

 

Quartz Mountain is incorporated pursuant to the laws of the Province of British Columbia, Canada. There is no law or governmental decree or regulation in Canada that restricts the export or import of capital, or affects the remittance of dividends, interest, or other payments to a non-resident holder of common shares, other than withholding tax requirements. Any such remittances to United States residents are generally subject to withholding tax, however no such remittances are likely in the foreseeable future. See "Taxation", below.

 

There is no limitation imposed by Canadian law or by the charter or other constituent documents of the Company on the right of a non-resident to hold or vote Common Shares of the Company, except that the Investment Canada Act may require review and approval by the Minister of Industry (Canada) of certain acquisitions of "control" of the Company by a "non-Canadian". The threshold for acquisitions of "control" is generally defined as being one-third or more of the voting shares of the Company. "Non-Canadian" generally means an individual who is not a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident of Canada, or a corporation, partnership, trust or joint venture that is ultimately controlled by non-Canadians.

 

E. TAXATION

 

Certain Canadian Federal Income Tax Information for United States Residents

 

The following summarizes the principal Canadian federal income tax considerations generally applicable to the holding and disposition of common shares of the Company by a holder (a) who, for the purposes of the Income Tax Act (Canada) the ("Tax Act"), is not resident in Canada or deemed to be resident in Canada, deals at arm's length and is not affiliated with the Company, holds the common shares as capital property and does not use or hold the common shares in the course of carrying on, or otherwise in connection with, a business in Canada, and (b) who, for the purposes of the Canada- United States Income Tax Convention (the "Treaty"), is a resident of the United States, has never been a resident of Canada, has not held or used (and does not hold or use) common shares in connection with a permanent establishment or fixed base in Canada, and who qualifies for the full benefits of the Treaty. The Canada Revenue Agency has recently introduced special forms to be used in order to substantiate eligibility for Treaty benefits, and affected holders should consult with their own advisors with respect to these forms and all relevant compliance matters.

 

 
39

 

 

Holders who meet all such criteria in clauses (a) and (b) above are referred to herein as a "U.S. Holder" or "U.S. Holders", and this summary only addresses such U.S. Holders. The summary does not deal with special situations, such as particular circumstances of traders or dealers, limited liability companies, tax-exempt entities, insurers, financial institutions (including those to which the mark- to-market provisions of the Tax Act apply), or entities considered fiscally transparent under applicable law, or otherwise.

 

This summary is based on the current provisions of the Tax Act and the regulations thereunder, all proposed amendments to the Tax Act and regulations publicly announced by the Minister of Finance (Canada) to the date hereof, the current provisions of the Treaty and our understanding of the current administrative practices of the Canada Revenue Agency. It has been assumed that all currently proposed amendments to the Tax Act and regulations will be enacted as proposed and that there will be no other relevant change in any governing law, the Treaty or administrative policy, although no assurance can be given in these respects. This summary does not take into account provincial, U.S., or other foreign income tax considerations, which may differ significantly from those discussed herein.

 

This summary is not exhaustive of all possible Canadian income tax consequences. It is not intended as legal or tax advice to any particular U.S. Holder and should not be so construed. The tax consequences to a U.S. Holder will depend on that U.S. Holder's particular circumstances. Accordingly, all U.S. Holders or prospective U.S. Holders should consult their own tax advisors with respect to the tax consequences applicable to them having regard to their own particular circumstances. The discussion below is qualified accordingly.

 

Dividends

 

Dividends paid or deemed to be paid or credited by the Company to a U.S. Holder are subject to Canadian withholding tax. Under the Treaty, the rate of withholding tax on dividends paid to a U.S. Holder is generally limited to 15% of the gross dividend (or 5% in the case of a U.S. holder that is a corporate shareholder owning at least 10% of the Company's voting shares), provided the U.S. Holder can establish entitlement to the benefits of the Treaty.

 

Disposition

 

A U.S. Holder is generally not subject to tax under the Tax Act in respect of a capital gain realized on the disposition of a common share in the open market, unless the share is "taxable Canadian property" to the holder thereof and the U.S. Holder is not entitled to relief under the Treaty.

 

Provided that the Company's common shares are listed on a "designated stock exchange" for purposes of the Tax Act (which currently includes the TSX Venture) at the time of disposition, a common share will generally not constitute taxable Canadian property to a U.S. Holder unless, at any time during the 60 month period ending at the time of disposition, (i) the U.S. Holder or persons with whom the U.S. Holder did not deal at arm's length (or the U.S. Holder together with such persons) owned 25% or more of the issued shares of any class or series of the Company AND (ii) more than 50% of the fair market value of the share was derived directly or indirectly from certain types of assets, including real or immoveable property situated in Canada, Canadian resource properties or timber resource properties, and options, interests or rights in respect of any of the foregoing. Common shares may also be deemed taxable Canadian property under the Tax Act in certain specific circumstances. A U.S. Holder holding Common shares as taxable Canadian property should consult with the U.S. Holder's own tax advisors in advance of any disposition of Common shares or deemed disposition under the Tax Act in order to determine whether any relief from tax under the Tax Act may be available by virtue of the Treaty, and any related compliance procedures.

 

United States Federal Income Tax Consequences

 

The Company believes it is likely a "passive foreign investment company" which may have adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences for U.S. shareholders.

 

 
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U.S. shareholders should be aware that the Company believes it was classified as a passive foreign investment company ("PFIC") during the tax year ended July 31, 2021, and may be a PFIC in future tax years. If the Company is a PFIC for any year during a U.S. shareholder's holding period, then such U.S. shareholder generally will be required to treat any gain realized upon a disposition of common shares, or any so-called "excess distribution" received on its common shares, as ordinary income, and to pay an interest charge on a portion of such gain or distributions, unless the shareholder makes a timely and effective "qualified electing fund" election ("QEF Election") or a "mark-to-market" election with respect to the common shares. A U.S. shareholder who makes a QEF Election generally must report on a current basis its share of the Company's net capital gain and ordinary earnings for any year in which the Company is a PFIC, whether or not the Company distributes any amounts to its shareholders. However, U.S. shareholders should be aware that there can be no assurance that the Company will satisfy record keeping requirements that apply to a qualified electing fund, or that the Company will supply U.S. shareholders with information that such U.S. shareholders require to report under the QEF Election rules, in the event that the Company is a PFIC and a U.S. shareholder wishes to make a QEF Election. Thus, U.S. shareholders may not be able to make a QEF Election with respect to their common shares. A U.S. shareholder who makes the mark-to-market election generally must include as ordinary income each year the excess of the fair market value of the common shares over the taxpayer's basis therein. This paragraph is qualified in its entirety by the discussion below under the heading "Certain United States Federal Income Tax Considerations.” Each U.S. shareholder should consult its own tax advisor regarding the PFIC rules and the U.S. federal income tax consequences of the acquisition, ownership, and disposition of common shares.

 

Certain United States Federal Income Tax Considerations

 

The following is a general summary of certain material U.S. federal income tax considerations applicable to a U.S. Holder (as defined below) arising from and relating to the acquisition, ownership, and disposition of common shares.

 

This summary is for general information purposes only and does not purport to be a complete analysis or listing of all potential U.S. federal income tax considerations that may apply to a U.S. Holder arising from and relating to the acquisition, ownership, and disposition of common shares. In addition, this summary does not take into account the individual facts and circumstances of any particular U.S. Holder that may affect the U.S. federal income tax consequences to such U.S. Holder, including specific tax consequences to a U.S. Holder under an applicable tax treaty. Accordingly, this summary is not intended to be, and should not be construed as, legal or U.S. federal income tax advice with respect to any U.S. Holder. This summary does not address the U.S. federal alternative minimum,

U.S. federal estate and gift, U.S. state and local, and foreign tax consequences to U.S. Holders of the acquisition, ownership, and disposition of common shares. Each prospective U.S. Holder should consult its own tax advisor regarding the U.S. federal, U.S. federal alternative minimum, U.S. federal estate and gift, U.S. state and local and foreign tax consequences relating to the acquisition, ownership, and disposition of common shares.

 

No legal opinion from U.S. legal counsel or ruling from the Internal Revenue Service (the "IRS") has been requested, or will be obtained, regarding the U.S. federal income tax consequences of the acquisition, ownership, and disposition of common shares. This summary is not binding on the IRS, and the IRS is not precluded from taking a position that is different from, and contrary to, the positions taken in this summary. In addition, because the authorities on which this summary is based are subject to various interpretations, the IRS and the U.S. courts could disagree with one or more of the conclusions described in this summary.

 

Scope of this Summary

 

Authorities

 

This summary is based on the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the "Code"), Treasury Regulations (whether final, temporary, or proposed), published rulings of the IRS, published administrative positions of the IRS, the Convention Between Canada and the United States of America with Respect to Taxes on Income and on Capital, signed September 26, 1980, as amended (the "Canada-U.S. Tax Convention"), and U.S. court decisions that are applicable and, in each case, as in effect and available, as of the date of this document. Any of the authorities on which this summary is based could be changed in a material and adverse manner at any time, and any such change could be applied on a retroactive or prospective basis, which could affect the U.S. federal income tax considerations described in this summary. This summary does not discuss the potential effects, whether adverse or beneficial, of any proposed legislation that, if enacted, could be applied on a retroactive or prospective basis.

 

U.S. Holders

 

For purposes of this summary, the term "U.S. Holder" means a beneficial owner of common shares that is for U.S. federal income tax purposes:

 

·

an individual who is a citizen or resident of the U.S.;

 

 

·

a corporation (or other entity taxable as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes) organized under the laws of the U.S., any state thereof or the District of Columbia;

 

 
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·

an estate whose income is subject to U.S. federal income taxation regardless of its source; or

 

 

·

a trust that (1) is subject to the primary supervision of a court within the U.S. and the control of one or more U.S. persons for all substantial decisions or (2) has a valid election in effect under applicable Treasury Regulations to be treated as a U.S. person.

 

Non-U.S. Holders

 

For purposes of this summary, a "non-U.S. Holder" is a beneficial owner of common shares that is not a U.S. Holder. This summary does not address the U.S. federal income tax consequences to non-U.S. Holders arising from and relating to the acquisition, ownership, and disposition of common shares. Accordingly, a non-U.S. Holder should consult its own tax advisor regarding the U.S. federal, U.S. federal alternative minimum, U.S. federal estate and gift, U.S. state and local, and foreign tax consequences (including the potential application of and operation of any income tax treaties) relating to the acquisition, ownership, and disposition of common shares.

 

U.S. Holders Subject to Special U.S. Federal Income Tax Rules Not Addressed

 

This summary does not address the U.S. federal income tax considerations applicable to U.S. Holders that are subject to special provisions under the Code, including, but not limited to, the following: (a)

U.S. Holders that are tax-exempt organizations, qualified retirement plans, individual retirement accounts, or other tax-deferred accounts; (b) U.S. Holders that are financial institutions, underwriters, insurance companies, real estate investment trusts, or regulated investment companies; (c) U.S. Holders that are broker-dealers, dealers, or traders in securities or currencies that elect to apply a mark-to-market accounting method; (d) U.S. Holders that have a "functional currency" other than the U.S. Dollar; (e) U.S. Holders that own common shares as part of a straddle, hedging transaction, conversion transaction, constructive sale, or other arrangement involving more than one position; (f) U.S. Holders that acquired common shares in connection with the exercise of employee stock options or otherwise as compensation for services; (g) U.S. Holders that hold common shares other than as a capital asset within the meaning of Section 1221 of the Code (generally, property held for investment purposes); or (h) U.S. Holders that own or have owned (directly, indirectly, or by attribution) 10% or more of the total combined voting power of the outstanding shares of the Company. This summary also does not address the U.S. federal income tax considerations applicable to U.S. Holders who are: (a) U.S. expatriates or former long-term residents of the U.S.; (b) persons that have been, are, or will be a resident or deemed to be a resident in Canada for purposes of the Income Tax Act (Canada) (the "Tax Act"); (c) persons that use or hold, will use or hold, or that are or will be deemed to use or hold common shares in connection with carrying on a business in Canada; (d) persons whose common shares constitute "taxable Canadian property" under the Tax Act; or (e) persons that have a permanent establishment in Canada for the purposes of the Canada-U.S. Tax Convention. U.S. Holders that are subject to special provisions under the Code, including, but not limited to, U.S. Holders described immediately above, should consult their own tax advisor regarding the U.S. federal, U.S. federal alternative minimum, U.S. federal estate and gift, U.S. state and local and foreign tax consequences relating to the acquisition, ownership, and disposition of common shares.

 

If an entity or arrangement that is classified as a partnership (or other "pass-through" entity) for U.S. federal income tax purposes holds common shares, the U.S. federal income tax consequences to such entity and the partners (or other owners) of such entity generally will depend on the activities of the entity and the status of such partners (or owners). This summary does not address the tax consequences to any such owner. Partners (or other owners) of entities or arrangements that are classified as partnerships or as "pass-through" entities for U.S. federal income tax purposes should consult their own tax advisors regarding the U.S. federal income tax consequences arising from and relating to the acquisition, ownership, and disposition of common shares.

 

Passive Foreign Investment Company Rules

 

If the Company were to constitute a "passive foreign investment company" under the meaning of Section 1297 of the Code (a "PFIC", as defined below) for any year during a U.S. Holder's holding period, then certain potentially adverse rules will affect the U.S. federal income tax consequences to a U.S. Holder resulting from the acquisition, ownership and disposition of common shares. The Company believes that it was classified as a PFIC during the tax year ended July 31, 2020, and may be a PFIC in future tax years. The determination of whether any corporation was, or will be, a PFIC for a tax year depends, in part, on the application of complex U.S. federal income tax rules, which are subject to differing interpretations. In addition, whether any corporation will be a PFIC for any tax year depends on the assets and income of such corporation over the course of each such tax year and, as a result, cannot be predicted with certainty as of the date of this document. Accordingly, there can be no assurance that the IRS will not challenge any determination made by the Company (or any subsidiary of the Company) concerning its PFIC status. Each U.S. Holder should consult its own tax advisor regarding the PFIC status of the Company and any subsidiary of the Company.

 

 
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In addition, in any year in which the Company is classified as a PFIC, such holder would be required to file an annual report with the IRS containing such information as Treasury Regulations and/or other IRS guidance may require. U.S. Holders should consult their own tax advisors regarding the requirements of filing such information returns under these rules, including the requirement to file an IRS Form 8621.

 

PFIC Status of the Company

 

The Company generally will be a PFIC if, for a tax year, (a) 75% or more of the gross income of the Company is passive income (the "income test") or (b) 50% or more of the value of the Company's assets either produce passive income or are held for the production of passive income, based on the quarterly average of the fair market value of such assets (the "asset test"). "Gross income" generally includes all sales revenues less the cost of goods sold, and income from investments and from incidental or outside operations or sources, and "passive income" generally includes, for example, dividends, interest, certain rents and royalties, certain gains from the sale of stock and securities, and certain gains from commodities transactions.

 

Active business gains arising from the sale of commodities generally are excluded from passive income if substantially all (85% or more) of a foreign corporation's commodities are stock in trade or inventory, depreciable property used in a trade or business, or supplies regularly used or consumed in a trade or business and certain other requirements are satisfied.

 

For purposes of the PFIC income test and asset test described above, if the Company owns, directly or indirectly, 25% or more of the total value of the outstanding shares of another corporation, the Company will be treated as if it (a) held a proportionate share of the assets of such other corporation and (b) received directly a proportionate share of the income of such other corporation. In addition, for purposes of the PFIC income test and asset test described above, and assuming certain other requirements are met, "passive income" does not include certain interest, dividends, rents, or royalties that are received or accrued by the Company from certain "related persons" (as defined in Section 954(d) (3) of the Code), to the extent such items are properly allocable to the income of such related person that is not passive income.

 

Under certain attribution rules, if the Company is a PFIC, U.S. Holders will generally be deemed to own their proportionate share of the Company's direct or indirect equity interest in any company that is also a PFIC (a ''Subsidiary PFIC''), and will be subject to U.S. federal income tax on their proportionate share of (a) any "excess distributions," as described below, on the stock of a Subsidiary PFIC and (b) a disposition or deemed disposition of the stock of a Subsidiary PFIC by the Company or another Subsidiary PFIC, both as if such U.S. Holders directly held the shares of such Subsidiary PFIC. In addition, U.S. Holders may be subject to U.S. federal income tax on any indirect gain realized on the stock of a Subsidiary PFIC on the sale or disposition of common shares. Accordingly, U.S. Holders should be aware that they could be subject to tax even if no distributions are received and no redemptions or other dispositions of common shares are made.

 

Default PFIC Rules under Section 1291 of the Code

 

If the Company is a PFIC for any tax year during which a U.S. Holder owns common shares, the U.S. federal income tax consequences to such U.S. Holder of the acquisition, ownership, and disposition of common shares will depend on whether and when such U.S. Holder makes an election to treat the Company and each Subsidiary PFIC, if any, as a "qualified electing fund" or "QEF" under Section 1295 of the Code (a "QEF Election") or makes a mark-to-market election under Section 1296 of the Code (a "Mark-to-Market Election"). A U.S. Holder that does not make either a QEF Election or a Mark-to- Market Election will be referred to in this summary as a "Non-Electing U.S. Holder."

 

A Non-Electing U.S. Holder will be subject to the rules of Section 1291 of the Code (described below) with respect to (a) any gain recognized on the sale or other taxable disposition of common shares and (b) any excess distribution received on the common shares. A distribution generally will be an "excess distribution" to the extent that such distribution (together with all other distributions received in the current tax year) exceeds 125% of the average distributions received during the three preceding tax years (or during a U.S. Holder's holding period for the common shares, if shorter).

 

Under Section 1291 of the Code, any gain recognized on the sale or other taxable disposition of common shares (including an indirect disposition of the stock of any Subsidiary PFIC), and any "excess distribution" received on common shares or with respect to the stock of a Subsidiary PFIC, must be ratably allocated to each day in a Non-Electing U.S. Holder's holding period for the respective common shares. The amount of any such gain or excess distribution allocated to the tax year of disposition or distribution of the excess distribution and to years before the entity became a PFIC, if any, would be taxed as ordinary income. The amounts allocated to any other tax year would be subject to U.S. federal income tax at the highest tax rate applicable to ordinary income in each such year, and an interest charge would be imposed on the tax liability for each such year, calculated as if such tax liability had been due in each such year. A Non-Electing U.S. Holder that is not a corporation must treat any such interest paid as "personal interest," which is not deductible.

 

 
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If the Company is a PFIC for any tax year during which a Non-Electing U.S. Holder holds common shares, the Company will continue to be treated as a PFIC with respect to such Non-Electing U.S. Holder, regardless of whether the Company ceases to be a PFIC in one or more subsequent tax years. A Non-Electing U.S. Holder may terminate this deemed PFIC status by electing to recognize gain (which will be taxed under the rules of Section 1291 of the Code discussed above), but not loss, as if such common shares were sold on the last day of the last tax year for which the Company was a PFIC.

 

QEF Election

 

A U.S. Holder that makes a timely and effective QEF Election for the first tax year in which its holding period of its common shares begins generally will not be subject to the rules of Section 1291 of the Code discussed above with respect to its common shares. A U.S. Holder that makes a timely and effective QEF Election will be subject to U.S. federal income tax on such U.S. Holder's pro rata share of (a) the net capital gain of the Company, which will be taxed as long-term capital gain to such U.S. Holder, and (b) the ordinary earnings of the Company, which will be taxed as ordinary income to such U.S. Holder. Generally, "net capital gain" is the excess of (a) net long-term capital gain over (b) net short-term capital loss, and "ordinary earnings" are the excess of (a) "earnings and profits" over (b) net capital gain. A U.S. Holder that makes a QEF Election will be subject to U.S. federal income tax on such amounts for each tax year in which the Company is a PFIC, regardless of whether such amounts are actually distributed to such U.S. Holder by the Company. However, for any tax year in which the Company is a PFIC and has no net income or gain, U.S. Holders that have made a QEF Election would not have any income inclusions as a result of the QEF Election. If a U.S. Holder that made a QEF Election has an income inclusion, such a U.S. Holder may, subject to certain limitations, elect to defer payment of current U.S. federal income tax on such amounts, subject to an interest charge. If such U.S. Holder is not a corporation, any such interest paid will be treated as "personal interest," which is not deductible.

 

A U.S. Holder that makes a timely and effective QEF Election with respect to the Company generally

(a) may receive a tax-free distribution from the Company to the extent that such distribution represents "earnings and profits" of the Company that were previously included in income by the U.S. Holder because of such QEF Election and (b) will adjust such U.S. Holder's tax basis in the common shares to reflect the amount included in income or allowed as a tax-free distribution because of such QEF Election. In addition, a U.S. Holder that makes a QEF Election generally will recognize capital gain or loss on the sale or other taxable disposition of common shares.

 

The procedure for making a QEF Election, and the U.S. federal income tax consequences of making a QEF Election, will depend on whether such QEF Election is timely. A QEF Election will be treated as "timely" if such QEF Election is made for the first year in the U.S. Holder's holding period for the common shares in which the Company was a PFIC. A U.S. Holder may make a timely QEF Election by filing the appropriate QEF Election documents at the time such U.S. Holder files a U.S. federal income tax return for such year. If a U.S. Holder does not make a timely and effective QEF Election for the first year in the U.S. Holder's holding period for the common shares, the U.S. Holder may still be able to make a timely and effective QEF Election in a subsequent year if such U.S. Holder meets certain requirements and makes a "purging" election to recognize gain (which will be taxed under the rules of Section 1291 of the Code discussed above) as if such common shares were sold for their fair market value on the day the QEF Election is effective. If a U.S. Holder owns PFIC stock indirectly through another PFIC, separate QEF Elections must be made for the PFIC in which the U.S. Holder is a direct shareholder and the Subsidiary PFIC for the QEF rules to apply to both PFICs.

 

A QEF Election will apply to the tax year for which such QEF Election is timely made and to subsequent tax years, unless such QEF Election is invalidated or terminated or the IRS consents to revocation of such QEF Election. If a U.S. Holder makes a QEF Election and, in a subsequent tax year, the Company ceases to be a PFIC, the QEF Election will remain in effect (although it will not be applicable) during those tax years in which the Company is not a PFIC. Accordingly, if the Company becomes a PFIC in another subsequent tax year, the QEF Election will be effective and the U.S. Holder will be subject to the QEF rules described above during any subsequent tax year in which the Company qualifies as a PFIC.

 

U.S. Holders should be aware that there can be no assurances that the Company will satisfy the record keeping requirements that apply to a QEF, or that the Company will supply U.S. Holders with information that such U.S. Holders are required to report under the QEF rules, in the event that the Company is a PFIC. Thus, U.S. Holders may not be able to make a QEF Election with respect to their common shares. Each U.S. Holder should consult its own tax advisor regarding the availability of, and procedure for making, a QEF Election.

 

 
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A U.S. Holder makes a QEF Election by attaching a completed IRS Form 8621, including a PFIC Annual Information Statement, to a timely filed United States federal income tax return. However, if the Company cannot provide the required information with regard to the Company or any of its Subsidiary PFICs, U.S. Holders will not be able to make a QEF Election for such entity and will continue to be subject to the rules discussed above that apply to Non-Electing U.S. Holders with respect to the taxation of gains and excess distributions.

 

Mark-to-Market Election

 

A U.S. Holder may make a Mark-to-Market Election only if the common shares are marketable stock. The common shares generally will be "marketable stock" if the common shares are regularly traded on (a) a national securities exchange that is registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission, (b) the national market system established pursuant to section 11A of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, or (c) a foreign securities exchange that is regulated or supervised by a governmental authority of the country in which the market is located, provided that (i) such foreign exchange has trading volume, listing, financial disclosure, and surveillance requirements, and meets other requirements and the laws of the country in which such foreign exchange is located, together with the rules of such foreign exchange, ensure that such requirements are actually enforced and (ii) the rules of such foreign exchange effectively promote active trading of listed stocks. If such stock is traded on such a qualified exchange or other market, such stock generally will be "regularly traded" for any calendar year during which such stock is traded, other than in de minimis quantities, on at least 15 days during each calendar quarter.

 

A U.S. Holder that makes a Mark-to-Market Election with respect to its common shares generally will not be subject to the rules of Section 1291 of the Code discussed above with respect to such common shares. However, if a U.S. Holder does not make a Mark-to-Market Election beginning in the first tax year of such U.S. Holder's holding period for the common shares or such U.S. Holder has not made a timely QEF Election, the rules of Section 1291 of the Code discussed above will apply to certain dispositions of, and distributions on, the common shares.

 

A U.S. Holder that makes a Mark-to-Market Election will include in ordinary income, for each tax year in which the Company is a PFIC, an amount equal to the excess, if any, of (a) the fair market value of the common shares, as of the close of such tax year over (b) such U.S. Holder's tax basis in such common shares. A U.S. Holder that makes a Mark-to-Market Election will be allowed a deduction in an amount equal to the excess, if any, of (a) such U.S. Holder's adjusted tax basis in the common shares, over (b) the fair market value of such common shares (but only to the extent of the net amount of previously included income as a result of the Mark-to-Market Election for prior tax years).

 

A U.S. Holder that makes a Mark-to-Market Election generally also will adjust such U.S. Holder's tax basis in the common shares to reflect the amount included in gross income or allowed as a deduction because of such Mark-to-Market Election. In addition, upon a sale or other taxable disposition of common shares, a U.S. Holder that makes a Mark-to-Market Election will recognize ordinary income or ordinary loss (not to exceed the excess, if any, of (a) the amount included in ordinary income because of such Mark-to-Market Election for prior tax years over (b) the amount allowed as a deduction because of such Mark-to-Market Election for prior tax years). Losses that exceed this limitation are subject to the rules generally applicable to losses provided in the Code and Treasury Regulations.

 

A Mark-to-Market Election applies to the tax year in which such Mark-to-Market Election is made and to each subsequent tax year, unless the common shares cease to be "marketable stock" or the IRS consents to revocation of such election. Each U.S. Holder should consult its own tax advisor regarding the availability of, and procedure for making, a Mark-to-Market Election.

 

Although a U.S. Holder may be eligible to make a Mark-to-Market Election with respect to the common shares, no such election may be made with respect to the stock of any Subsidiary PFIC that a U.S. Holder is treated as owning, because such stock is not marketable. Hence, the Mark-to-Market Election will not be effective to eliminate the application of the default rules of Section 1291 of the Code described above with respect to deemed dispositions of Subsidiary PFIC stock or excess distributions from a Subsidiary PFIC.

 

Other PFIC Rules

 

Under Section 1291(f) of the Code, the IRS has issued proposed Treasury Regulations that, subject to certain exceptions, would cause a U.S. Holder that had not made a timely QEF Election to recognize gain (but not loss) upon certain transfers of common shares that would otherwise be tax-deferred (e.g., gifts and exchanges pursuant to corporate reorganizations). However, the specific U.S. federal income tax consequences to a U.S. Holder may vary based on the manner in which common shares are transferred.

 

Certain additional adverse rules may apply with respect to a U.S. Holder if the Company is a PFIC, regardless of whether such U.S. Holder makes a QEF Election. For example, under Section 1298(b)(6) of the Code, a U.S. Holder that uses common shares as security for a loan will, except as may be provided in Treasury Regulations, be treated as having made a taxable disposition of such common shares.

 

 
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Special rules also apply to the amount of foreign tax credit that a U.S. Holder may claim on a distribution from a PFIC. Subject to such special rules, foreign taxes paid with respect to any distribution in respect of stock in a PFIC are generally eligible for the foreign tax credit. The rules relating to distributions by a PFIC and their eligibility for the foreign tax credit are complicated, and a U.S. Holder should consult with its own tax advisor regarding the availability of the foreign tax credit with respect to distributions by a PFIC.

 

The PFIC rules are complex, and each U.S. Holder should consult its own tax advisor regarding the PFIC rules and how the PFIC rules may affect the U.S. federal income tax consequences of the acquisition, ownership, and disposition of common shares.

 

Ownership and Disposition of Common Shares

 

The following discussion is subject to the rules described above under the heading "Passive Foreign Investment Company Rules."

 

Distributions on Common Shares

 

A U.S. Holder that receives a distribution, including a constructive distribution, with respect to a common share will be required to include the amount of such distribution in gross income as a dividend (without reduction for any Canadian income tax withheld from such distribution) to the extent of the current or accumulated "earnings and profits" of the Company, as computed for U.S. federal income tax purposes. A dividend generally will be taxed to a U.S. Holder at ordinary income tax rates if the Company is a PFIC. To the extent that a distribution exceeds the current and accumulated "earnings and profits" of the Company, such distribution will be treated first as a tax- free return of capital to the extent of a U.S. Holder's tax basis in the common shares and thereafter as gain from the sale or exchange of such common shares. (See "Sale or Other Taxable Disposition of common shares" below). However, the Company may not maintain the calculations of earnings and profits in accordance with U.S. federal income tax principles, and each U.S. Holder should therefore assume that any distribution by the Company with respect to the common shares will constitute ordinary dividend income. Dividends received on common shares generally will not be eligible for the "dividends received deduction". In addition, the Company does not anticipate that its distributions will constitute qualified dividend income eligible for the preferential tax rates applicable to long-term capital gains. The dividend rules are complex, and each U.S. Holder should consult its own tax advisor regarding the application of such rules.

 

Sale or Other Taxable Disposition of Common Shares

 

Upon the sale or other taxable disposition of common shares, a U.S. Holder generally will recognize capital gain or loss in an amount equal to the difference between the U.S. Dollar value of cash received plus the fair market value of any property received and such U.S. Holder's tax basis in such common shares sold or otherwise disposed of. A U.S. Holder's tax basis in common shares generally will be such holder's U.S. Dollar cost for such common shares. Gain or loss recognized on such sale or other disposition generally will be long-term capital gain or loss if, at the time of the sale or other disposition, the common shares have been held for more than one year.

 

Preferential tax rates currently apply to long-term capital gain of a U.S. Holder that is an individual, estate, or trust. There are currently no preferential tax rates for long-term capital gain of a U.S. Holder that is a corporation. Deductions for capital losses are subject to significant limitations under the Code.

 

Additional Tax on Passive Income

 

For tax years beginning after December 31, 2012, certain individuals, estates and trusts whose income exceeds certain thresholds will be required to pay a 3.8% Medicare surtax on "net investment income" including, among other things, dividends and net gain from dispositions of property (other than property held in a trade or business). U.S. Holders should consult with their own tax advisors regarding the effect, if any, of this tax on their ownership and disposition of common shares.

 

Receipt of Foreign Currency

 

The amount of any distribution paid to a U.S. Holder in foreign currency, or on the sale, exchange or other taxable disposition of common shares, generally will be equal to the U.S. Dollar value of such foreign currency based on the exchange rate applicable on the date of receipt (regardless of whether such foreign currency is converted into U.S. Dollars at that time). A U.S. Holder will have a basis in the foreign currency equal to its U.S. Dollar value on the date of receipt. Any U.S. Holder who converts or otherwise disposes of the foreign currency after the date of receipt may have a foreign currency exchange gain or loss that would be treated as ordinary income or loss, and generally will be U.S. source income or loss for foreign tax credit purposes. Each U.S. Holder should consult its own U.S. tax advisor regarding the U.S. federal income tax consequences of receiving, owning, and disposing of foreign currency.

 

 
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Foreign Tax Credit

 

Subject to the PFIC rules discussed above, a U.S. Holder that pays (whether directly or through withholding) Canadian income tax with respect to dividends paid on the common shares generally will be entitled, at the election of such U.S. Holder, to receive either a deduction or a credit for such Canadian income tax. Generally, a credit will reduce a U.S. Holder's U.S. federal income tax liability on a Dollar-for-Dollar basis, whereas a deduction will reduce a U.S. Holder's income subject to U.S. federal income tax. This election is made on a year-by-year basis and applies to all foreign taxes paid (whether directly or through withholding) by a U.S. Holder during a year.

 

Complex limitations apply to the foreign tax credit, including the general limitation that the credit cannot exceed the proportionate share of a U.S. Holder's U.S. federal income tax liability that such U.S. Holder's "foreign source" taxable income bears to such U.S. Holder's worldwide taxable income. In applying this limitation, a U.S. Holder's various items of income and deduction must be classified, under complex rules, as either "foreign source" or "U.S. source." Generally, dividends paid by a foreign corporation should be treated as foreign source for this purpose, and gains recognized on the sale of stock of a foreign corporation by a U.S. Holder should be treated as U.S. source for this purpose, except as otherwise provided in an applicable income tax treaty, and if an election is properly made under the Code. However, the amount of a distribution with respect to the common shares that is treated as a "dividend" may be lower for U.S. federal income tax purposes than it is for Canadian federal income tax purposes, resulting in a reduced foreign tax credit allowance to a U.S. Holder. In addition, this limitation is calculated separately with respect to specific categories of income. The foreign tax credit rules are complex, and each U.S. Holder should consult its own U.S. tax advisor regarding the foreign tax credit rules.

 

Backup Withholding and Information Reporting

 

Under U.S. federal income tax law and Treasury Regulations, certain categories of U.S. Holders must file information returns with respect to their investment in, or involvement in, a foreign corporation. For example, recently enacted legislation generally imposes new U.S. return disclosure obligations (and related penalties) on individuals who are U.S. Holders that hold certain specified foreign financial assets in excess of $50,000. The definition of specified foreign financial assets includes not only financial accounts maintained in foreign financial institutions, but also, unless held in accounts maintained by a financial institution, any stock or security issued by a non-U.S. person, any financial instrument or contract held for investment that has an issuer or counterparty other than a U.S. person and any interest in a foreign entity. U.S. Holders may be subject to these reporting requirements unless their common shares are held in an account at a domestic financial institution. Penalties for failure to file certain of these information returns are substantial. U.S. Holders should consult with their own tax advisors regarding the requirements of filing information returns, including the requirement to file an IRS Form 8938.

 

Payments made within the U.S. or by a U.S. payor or U.S. middleman, of dividends on, and proceeds arising from the sale or other taxable disposition of, common shares will generally be subject to information reporting and backup withholding tax, at the rate of 28% (and increasing to 31% for payments made after December 31, 2012), if a U.S. Holder (a) fails to furnish such U.S. Holder's correct U.S. taxpayer identification number (generally on Form W-9), (b) furnishes an incorrect U.S. taxpayer identification number, (c) is notified by the IRS that such U.S. Holder has previously failed to properly report items subject to backup withholding tax, or (d) fails to certify, under penalty of perjury, that such U.S. Holder has furnished its correct U.S. taxpayer identification number and that the IRS has not notified such U.S. Holder that it is subject to backup withholding tax. However, certain exempt persons generally are excluded from these information reporting and backup withholding rules. Backup withholding is not an additional tax. Any amounts withheld under the U.S. backup withholding tax rules will be allowed as a credit against a U.S. Holder's U.S. federal income tax liability, if any, or will be refunded, if such U.S. Holder furnishes required information to the IRS in a timely manner. Each U.S. Holder should consult its own tax advisor regarding the information reporting and backup withholding rules.

 

F. DIVIDENDS AND PAYING AGENTS

 

Not applicable.

 

 
47

 

 

G. STATEMENT BY EXPERTS

 

Not applicable.

 

H. DOCUMENTS ON DISPLAY

 

Exhibits attached to this Form 20-F are also available for viewing on EDGAR at http://www.sec.gov/, or at the offices of the Company, 14th Floor - 1040 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6E 4H1 or on request of the Company at 604-684-6365, attention: Investor Relations Department. Copies of the Company's IFRS financial statements and other continuous disclosure documents required under the British Columbia Securities Act are available for viewing on the internet at www.sedar.com.

 

I. SUBSIDIARY INFORMATION

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 11 QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

A. TRANSACTION RISK AND CURRENCY RISK MANAGEMENT

 

The Company is exposed in varying degrees to a variety of financial instrument related risks. The Board approves and monitors the risk management processes, inclusive of documented treasury policies, counterparty limits, and controlling and reporting structures.

 

B. EXCHANGE RATE SENSITIVITY

 

The Company incurs substantially all of its expenditures in Canada and substantially all of its cash is denominated in Canadian dollars. Consequently, the Company is not subject to material foreign exchange risk.

 

C. INTEREST RATE RISK AND EQUITY PRICE RISK

 

The Company is subject to interest rate risk with respect to its investments in cash. The Company's policy is to invest cash at fixed rates of interest and cash reserves are to be maintained in cash and cash equivalents in order to maintain liquidity, while achieving a satisfactory return for shareholders. Fluctuations in interest rates when the cash and cash equivalents mature impact interest income earned.

 

D. COMMODITY PRICE RISK

 

While the value of the Company's resource properties, if any, can always be said to relate to the price of precious metals and the outlook for same, the Company does not have any resource properties or operating mines and hence does not have any hedging or other commodity based operational risks respecting to its business activities.

 

ITEM 12 DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES OTHER THAN EQUITY SECURITIES

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 13 DEFAULTS, DIVIDEND ARREARAGES AND DELINQUENCIES

 

Not applicable.

 

 
48

 

 

ITEM 14 MATERIAL MODIFICATIONS TO THE RIGHTS OF SECURITY HOLDERS AND USE OF PROCEEDS

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 15 CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

A. DISCLOSURE CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

At the end of the period covered by this annual report on Form 20-F, an evaluation was carried out with the participation of the Company's management, including the President and Chief Executive Officer ("CEO") and the Chief Financial Officer ("CFO"), of the effectiveness of the Company's disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a – 15(e) and 15d –15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act")). Based on that evaluation, the President and CEO and the CFO have concluded that as of the end of the period covered by this annual report on Form 20-F, the Company's disclosure controls and procedures were effective in providing reasonable assurance that: (i) information required to be disclosed by the Company in reports that it files or submits to the SEC under the Exchange Act was recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in applicable rules and forms, and (ii) material information required to be disclosed in the Company's reports filed under the Exchange Act was accumulated and communicated to the Company's management, including the President and CEO and the CFO, as appropriate, to allow for accurate and timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

B. MANAGEMENT'S ANNUAL REPORT ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING

 

The Company's management, including the President and CEO and CFO, is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act. The Company's internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation and fair presentation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with IFRS. The Company's internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that:

 

 

·

pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the Company;

 

·

provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with IFRS, and that receipts and expenditures of the Company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the Company; and

 

·

provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the Company's assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

 

With the participation of the President and CEO and CFO, management conducted an evaluation of the design and operation of the Company's internal control over financial reporting as of July 31, 2021, based on the criteria set forth in Internal Control-Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. This evaluation included review of the documentation of controls, evaluation of the design effectiveness of controls, testing of the operating effectiveness of controls and a conclusion on this evaluation. Based on this evaluation, management concluded in its report that the Company's internal control over financial reporting was effective as of July 31, 2022.

 

This annual report does not include an attestation report of the Company's registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management's report was not subject to attestation by the Company's registered public accounting firm pursuant to rules that permit the Company to provide only management's report in this annual report.

 

CHANGES IN INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING

 

During the period covered by this Annual Report on Form 20-F, no changes occurred in the Company's internal control over financial reporting that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company's internal control over financial reporting.

 

 
49

 

 

LIMITATIONS OF CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

The Company's management, including its President and CEO and CFO, does not expect that its disclosure controls and procedures or internal controls and procedures will prevent all errors and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the controls. The design of any system of controls is also based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions; over time, controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.

 

ITEM 16 [RESERVED]

 

ITEM 16A AUDIT COMMITTEE FINANCIAL EXPERT

 

The members of the Audit Committee are Trevor Thomas, Matthew Dickinson, and Leonie Tomlinson. The Board of Directors has determined that Ms. Thomlinson qualifies as a "financial expert" under the rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission, based on her education and experience. Ms. Tomlinson is "independent", as that term is defined in section 803 of the NYSE MKT Company Guide.

 

Each Audit Committee member is able to read and understand fundamental financial statements.

 

ITEM 16B CODE OF ETHICS

 

The Company's board of directors has adopted a written Code of Ethics governing directors, officers, and employees. The Code of Ethics sets forth written standards that are designed to deter wrongdoing and to meet the Company's core vision: to become a successful and innovative mining and mineral exploration corporation.

 

In order to achieve the Company's vision the following values are to be included in all activities:

 

 

·

Responsibly explore for and develop mineral resources;

 

·

Be respectful of the environment;

 

·

Be an industry leader and participate in industry organizations devoted to improving the industry;

 

·

Be a strong and honest competitor;

 

·

Be a responsible corporate citizen and contribute to the community;

 

·

Deal fairly with our customers, suppliers and joint venture participants;

 

·

Provide a safe and rewarding work environment; and

 

·

Deliver value to shareholders.

 

The board of directors monitors compliance with the Code of Ethics by ensuring that all Company personnel have read and understood the Code of Ethics, and by charging management with bringing to the attention of the board of directors any issues that arise with respect to the Code of Ethics.

 

A copy of the Code of Ethics was filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission as an exhibit to the Company's Annual Report filed on Form 20-F for the fiscal year ended July 31, 2012 and is available at www.sec.gov. The Company will also provide a copy of the Code of Ethics to any person without charge, upon request. Requests can be sent by mail to: 14th Floor, 1040 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V6E 4H8; or submitted by telephone at 604-684-6365, attention: Investor Relations Department.

 

During the most recently completed fiscal year, the Company has neither: (a) amended its Code of Ethics; nor (b) granted any waiver (including any implicit waiver) form any provision of its Code of Ethics.

 

 
50

 

 

ITEM 16C PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

 

The following table discloses the aggregate fees billed for each of the last fiscal year for professional services rendered by the Company's former audit firm, Davidson & Company LLP for various services and estimate audit fee for the newly appointed audit firm, DeVisser Gray LLP.

 

Services:

Year ended

 

July 31, 2022

July 31, 2021

Audit Fees (1)

$13,000(estimate)

$12,900

Audit Related Fees (2)

Tax Fees (3)

All Other Fees (4)

Total

$13,000(estimate)

$12,900

 

Notes:

 

(1) "Audit Fees" include fees necessary to perform the annual audit and quarterly reviews of the Company's consolidated financial statements. Audit Fees include fees for review of tax provisions and for accounting consultations on matters reflected in the financial statements. Audit Fees also include audit or other attest services required by legislation or regulation, such as comfort letters, consents, reviews of securities filings and statutory audits.

 

(2) "Audit-Related Fees" include services that are traditionally performed by the auditor. These audit-related services include employee benefit audits, due diligence assistance, accounting consultations on proposed transactions, internal control reviews and audit or attest services not required by legislation or regulation.

 

(3) "Tax Fees" include fees billed for professional services rendered by the principal accountant for tax compliance, tax advice, and tax planning.

 

(4) "All Other Fees" include fees billed for products and services provided by the principal accountant, other than the services reported in (1), (2), or (3) above.

 

From time to time, management of the Company recommends to and requests approval from the Audit Committee for non-audit services to be provided by the Company's auditors. The Audit Committee routinely considers such requests at committee meetings, and if acceptable to a majority of the Audit Committee members, pre-approves such non-audit services by a resolution authorizing management to engage the Company's auditors for such non-audit services, with set maximum dollar amounts for each itemized service. During such deliberations, the Audit Committee assesses, among other factors, whether the services requested would be considered "prohibited services" as contemplated by the SEC, and whether the services requested and the fees related to such services could impair the independence of the auditors. No material non-audit services were provided by the Company's auditors during the year ended July 31, 2022.

 

ITEM 16D EXEMPTIONS FROM LISTING STANDARDS FOR AUDIT COMMITTEES

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 16E PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES BY THE ISSUER AND AFFILIATED PURCHASERS

 

During the year ended July 31, 2022, the Company did not purchase any of its issued and outstanding common shares pursuant to any repurchase program or otherwise.

 

ITEM 16F CHANGE IN REGISTRANT'S CERTIFYING ACCOUNTANT

 

None.

 

ITEM 16G CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 16H MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURE

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 17 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Not applicable. See Item 18.

 

ITEM 18 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

See Exhibit 99.1.

 

 
51

 

 

ITEM 19 EXHIBITS

 

The following Exhibits have been filed with the Company's Annual Report on Form 20-F in previous years:

 

Exhibit

Number

 

Description of Exhibit

 

Note

1.1

 

Transition Application dated October 11, 2005

 

Incorporated by reference from our Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended July 31, 2005, filed on January 10, 2006.

1.2

 

Notice of Articles dated October 11, 2005

 

Incorporated by reference from our Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended July 31, 2005, filed on January 10, 2006.

1.3

 

Notice of Alteration of Articles dated October 11, 2005

 

Incorporated by reference from our Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended July 31, 2005, filed on January 10, 2006.

1.4

 

Notice of Alteration dated February 17, 2006

 

Incorporated by reference from our Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended July 31, 2006, filed on January 29, 2007.

1.5

 

Notice of Articles dated February 17, 2006

 

Incorporated by reference from our Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended July 31, 2006, filed on January 29, 2007.

1.7

 

Articles, as amended the Company’s Annual General Meeting, held on February 24, 2014.

 

Incorporated by reference from our Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended July 31, 2014, filed on October 17, 2014.

4.2

 

Services Agreement between HDI and the Company dated July 2, 2010

 

Incorporated by reference from our Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended July 31, 2010, filed on October 29, 2010.

6.1

 

Stock Option Plan approved by Shareholders on March 15, 2012

 

Incorporated by reference from our Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended July 31, 2012, filed on November 30, 2012.

6.2

 

Audit Committee Charter

 

Incorporated by reference from our Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended July 31, 2012, filed on November 30, 2012.

10.1

 

Articles approved by Shareholders on March 15, 2012

 

Incorporated by reference from our Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended July 31, 2012, filed on November 30, 2012.

10.2

 

Articles approved by Shareholders on February 24, 2014

 

Incorporated by reference from our Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended July 31, 2016, filed on October 4, 2016.

 

 
52

 

 

Exhibit

Number

 

Description of Exhibit

 

Note

11.1

 

Settlement agreement between Bearclaw and HDSI dated January 15, 2016

 

Incorporated by reference from our Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended July 31, 2016, filed on October 4, 2016.

16B.

 

Code of Ethics and Trading Restrictions

 

Incorporated by reference from our Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended July 31, 2012, filed on November 30, 2012.

 

The following exhibits are filed with this Annual Report on Form 20-F:

 

Exhibit

Number

 

Description of Exhibit

12.1

 

Section 302 Certification of the Chief Executive Officer

12.2

 

Section 302 Certification of the Chief Financial Officer

13.1

 

Section 906 Certification of the Chief Executive Officer

13.2

 

Section 906 Certification of the Chief Financial Officer

99.1

 

Independent Auditor’s Report, dated November 25, 2022;   

Statements of financial position as at July 31, 2022, and July 31, 2021;

 

Statements of income (loss) and comprehensive income (loss) for the years ended July 31, 2022, July 31, 2021, and July 31, 2020;

 

Statements of cash flows for the years ended July 31, 2022, July 31, 2021, and July 31, 2020; and

 

Statements of changes in shareholders’ equity (deficiency) for the years ended July 31, 2022, July 31, 2021, and July 31, 2020;

 

Notes to audited annual financial statements

 

 
53

 

  

SIGNATURES

 

The registrant hereby certifies that it meets all of the requirements for filing on Form 20-F and that it has duly caused and authorized the undersigned to sign this Annual Report on its behalf.

 

QUARTZ MOUNTAIN RESOURCES LTD.
  
/s/ Robert Dickinson
Robert Dickinson 
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Dated: November 25, 2022 

 

 
54

 

ATTACHMENTS / EXHIBITS

CERTIFICATION

CERTIFICATION

CERTIFICATION

CERTIFICATION

FINANCIAL STATEMENT

XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION SCHEMA

XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION LABEL LINKBASE

XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION CALCULATION LINKBASE

XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION PRESENTATION LINKBASE

XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION DEFINITION LINKBASE

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