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Form 10-Q Real Brands, Inc. For: Jun 30

August 12, 2022 4:37 PM EDT

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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q

(X) QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the Quarterly Period ended June 30, 2022

( ) TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(D) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from __________________ to __________________

Commission File number 000-24115

REAL BRANDS INC.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

Nevada 40-0014655
(State or Other Jurisdiction of Incorporation or Organization) (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

 

12 Humbert Street

North Providence, RI 02911
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)


(617) 803-0004
(Registrant's Telephone Number, Including Area Code)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of each class Trading Symbol(s) Name of each exchange on which registered
    None

  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes [X] No [ ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes [X] No [ ]  

 

   

  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer”, “smaller reporting company”, and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

(Check One):

Large Accelerated filer Accelerated filer
Non-accelerated filer Smaller reporting company
Emerging growth company  

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes [ ] No [X]

 

As of August 8, 2022, 2,677,529,115 shares of the Issuer's Common Stock were outstanding (excludes an additional 3,111,111 issuable, but not yet issued, at such date).  

   

 

 

 

REAL BRANDS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

For the Six Months Ended June 30, 2022

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

Part I Financial Information      
         
Item 1. Financial Statements   2  
         
  Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets – as of June 30, 2022 (Unaudited) and December 31, 2021 (Audited)   2  
         
  Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Three and Six Months Ended June 30, 2022 and 2021 (Unaudited)   3  
         
  Condensed Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Deficit Six Months Ended June 30, 2022 and 2021 (Unaudited)   4  
         
  Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Six Months Ended June 30, 2022 and 2021 (Unaudited)   5  
         
  Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements   6  
         
Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations    15  
         
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk   N/A  
         
Item 4. Control and Procedures   N/A  
         
PART II OTHER INFORMATION      
         
Item 1. Legal Proceedings   21  
         
Item 1A. Risk Factors   21  
         
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds   21  
         
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities   21  
         
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures   N/A  
         
Item 5. Other Information   21  
         
Item 6. Exhibits   22  
         
SIGNATURES   23  

 

 

 

 1 

 

 

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1. Financial Statements

 

               
REAL BRANDS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
JUNE 30, 2022 AND DECEMBER 31, 2021
 
  Unaudited  Audited
  30-Jun-22  31-Dec-21
ASSETS         
CURRENT ASSETS:         
Cash and cash equivalents $8,981   $197,255 
Accounts receivables        898 
Total current assets  8,981    198,153 
          
Deposits  530    530 
Property and equipment - net of depreciation  1,198,970    1,239,809 
TOTAL ASSETS $1,208,481   $1,438,492 
          
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT         
          
CURRENT LIABILITIES:         
Accounts payable and accrued expenses $500,885   $513,065 
Accrued expenses related party  556,404    402,347 
Loan payable  25,000       
Loan payable related party  188,605    133,605 
Convertible note payable related party  200,000    200,000 
Notes payable        7,250 
Contingent liabilities        45,625 
TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES  1,470,894    1,301,892 
          
LONG TERM LIABILITIES         
Mortgage payable  137,109    148,551 
Total Long Term Liabilities  137,109    148,551 
          
TOTAL LIABILITIES  1,608,002    1,450,443 
          
STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT):         
Series A Preferred stock, $.001 par value; 2,000,000 shares authorized, no shares issued and outstanding as of June 30, 2022, 1,000,000 issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2021, respectively.        1,000 
Common stock, $.001 par value; 3,998,000,000 shares authorized as of June 30, 2022 and December 31, 2021; 2,677,529,115 shares issued and outstanding as of June 30, 2022 and December 31, 2021.  2,677,529    2,677,529 
Common stock subscribed, 6,806,011 and 3,694,900 shares at June 30, 2022 and December 31, 2021, respectively.  99,514    96,403 
Additional paid-in capital  9,004,822    8,881,728 
Accumulated deficit  (12,181,387)   (11,668,611)
          
TOTAL STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT  (399,522)   (11,951)
          
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT $1,208,481   $1,438,492 
          
See the accompanying notes to these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

 

 2 

 

  

 

                                 
REAL BRANDS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
FOR THE SIX AND THREE MONTHS ENDED JUNE 30, 2022 AND 2021
 
    Unaudited   Unaudited
    Six Months Ended June 30   Three Months Ended June 30
    2022   2021   2022   2021
REVENUE:                        
Revenues   $7,610    $1,545    $757    $1,084 
Total revenue    7,610     1,545     757     1,084 
Cost of goods sold    7,507     55,191     150     28,881 
Gross profit (loss)    103     (53,646)    607     (27,797)
                         
OPERATING EXPENSES:                        
General and administrative    226,354     168,818     103,267     44,750 
Professional fees    23,900     175,015     12,680     84,750 
Payroll and related    209,112     126,184     103,915     66,698 
Stock option expense           1,065,390            1,065,390 
Total operating expenses    459,366     1,535,407     219,863     1,261,588 
                         
Operating loss    (459,262)    (1,589,053)    (219,256)    (1,289,385)
                         
OTHER INCOME (EXPENSES):                        
Forgiveness of PPP debt           143,485            36,825 
Depreciation expense    (40,840)    (72,596)    (20,618)    (36,298)
Interest expense    (12,675)    (12,098)    (6,798)    (6,063)
Total other (expenses) income    (53,514)    58,791     (27,416)    (5,536)
                         
LOSS AFTER OTHER INCOME AND EXPENSES OPERATIONS    (512,777)    (1,530,261)    (246,672)    (1,294,921)
                         
PROVISION FOR INCOME TAXES                            
                         
NET LOSS   $(512,777)   $(1,530,261)   $(246,672)   $(1,294,921)
                         
BASIC AND DILUTED NET LOSS PER SHARE ATTRIBUTABLE TO COMMON STOCKHOLDERS   $**    $**    $**    $** 
                         
WEIGHTED AVERAGE SHARES OUTSTANDING    2,677,529,115     2,462,852,963     2,677,529,115     2,553,459,703 
                         

**

Less than $0.01 per share

                       
                         
See the accompanying notes to these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

 

 

 

 3 

 

 

                         
REAL BRANDS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)
FOR THE SIX MONTHS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 AND THE SIX MONTHS ENDED JUNE 30, 2022 UNAUDITED
                         
   Preferred Stock        Common   Additional      
   Series A   Common Stock   Stock   Paid-in   Accumulated   
   Shares  Amount  Shares  Amount  Subscribed  Capital  Deficit  TOTAL
Balance December 31, 2020   1,000,000    1,000    2,358,780,396    2,358,780    414,679    6,794,057    (8,872,840)  695,676 
                                        
Issuance for reverse merger   —            164,680,119    164,680    (164,680)                 
Issuance of common stock for cash   —            93,379,350    93,379    (149,999)   991,620         935,000 
Cashless exercise of stock options   —            2,587,500    2,588          (2,588)          
Stock options granted pursuant to the agreements   —            —                  1,065,390         1,065,390 
Net loss for the six months ended June 30, 2021   —            —                        (1,530,261)  (1,530,261)
                                        
Balance June 30, 2021   1,000,000    1,000    2,619,427,365    2,619,427    100,000    8,848,480    (10,403,102)  1,165,806 
                                        
Balance December 31, 2021   1,000,000    1,000    2,677,529,115    2,677,529    96,403    8,881,728    (11,668,611)  (11,951)
                                        
Cancellation of Preferred stock   (1,000,000)   (1,000)   —                  61,205         60,205 
Issuance of common stock for cash   —            —            3,111    61,889         65,000 
Net loss for the six months ended June 30, 2022   —            —                        (512,777)  (512,777)
                                        
Balance June 30, 2022               2,677,529,115    2,677,529    99,514    9,004,822    (12,181,387)  (399,522)
                                        
See the accompanying notes to these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

 4 

 

 

                 
REAL BRANDS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
FOR THE SIX MONTHS ENDED JUNE 30, 2022 and 2021
 
   Unaudited  Unaudited
   2022  2021
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:          
Net loss  $(512,777)  $(1,530,261)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:          
Gain on forgiveness of PPP loan         (143,485)
Option expense   —      1,012,372 
Depreciation expense   40,840    72,596 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:          
Accounts receivable   898    (375)
Inventory         39,450 
Accounts payable  and accrued expenses   141,877    314,134 
Contingency liabilities   (45,625)      
Net cash used in operating activities   (374,787)   (235,569)
           
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:          
Purchase of property and equipment         (296,801)
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities         (296,801)
           
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:          
Disposal of loans payable for IP   60,205       
Proceeds from loan payable   25,000       
Proceeds from loan payable related party   55,000       
Repayment of notes payable   (7,250)      
Repayment of mortgage payable   (11,442)   (10,855)
Proceeds from sale of common stock   65,000    935,000 
Net cash provided by financing activities  $186,513   $924,145 
           
NET CHANGE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS  $(188,274)  $391,775 
           
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, beginning of period  $197,255   $247,892 
           
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, end of period   8,981    639,667 
           
SUPPLEMENTAL CASH FLOW INFORMATION:          
Cash paid for interest   3,762    4,602 
Cash paid for income taxes            
           
See the accompanying notes to these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

 

 5 

  

REAL BRANDS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

NOTE 1. ORGANIZATION, BACKGROUND, AND BASIS OF PRESENTATION

 

Real Brands, Inc. (“Real Brands” or the “Company”), was incorporated under the laws of the state of Nevada on November 6, 1992. The Company was formed under the name Mercury Software. From 1997 to 2005 the Company changed its name several times. On October 10, 2005, the Company changed its name to Global Beverage Solutions, Inc. and began trading on the OTC Bulletin Board under the symbol GBVS.OB.

 

On October 22, 2013, the Company changed its name to Real Brands, Inc. The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”) approved Real Brands’ corporate actions regarding its name change and its new stock symbol request and approved Real Brands’ 150:1 Reverse Stock Split. The new symbol was designated as GBVSD. On November 19, 2013, the ticker symbol changed to RLBD.

 

On October 22, 2020, the majority of the shareholders of the Company, by written consent, agreed to a “reverse triangular” merger with CASH Acquisition Corp., a Delaware corporation and wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company formed for the purpose of the merger, and Canadian American Standard Hemp Inc., a Delaware corporation (“CASH”), whereby the Company acquired all of the outstanding shares of CASH and merged it with and into CASH Acquisition Corp. Real Brands’ name and trading symbol were maintained, with CASH shareholders acquiring majority control of Real Brands.

 

The merger was accounted for as a reverse merger, whereby CASH was considered the accounting acquirer and became our wholly-owned subsidiary. In accordance with the accounting treatment for a “reverse merger”, the Company’s historical financial statements prior to the reverse merger has been replaced with the historical financial statements of CASH prior to the reverse merger. The consolidated financial statements after completion of the reverse merger include the assets, liabilities, and results of operations of the combined company from and after the closing date of the reverse merger, with only certain aspects of pre-consummation stockholders’ equity remaining in the consolidated financial statements.

 

Going concern

 

The ability of the Company to obtain necessary financing to build its sales, brand, marketing and distribution and fund ongoing operating expenses is uncertain. The ability of the Company to generate sales revenue to offset the expenses and obtain profitability is uncertain. The Company had a net loss of $512,777 and $1,530,261 for the six months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively. These material uncertainties cast doubt on the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. In the event the Company’s revenues do not significantly increase, the Company will require additional financing or equity from time to time, which it intends to obtain through the issuance of common shares, debt, bonds, grants and other financial instruments. While the Company has been successful in raising funds through the issuance of common shares and obtaining debt in the past, there is no assurance that it will be able to obtain adequate financing in the future or that such financing will be available on acceptable terms and while the Company believes that its revenues will increase it does not currently expect them to generate sufficient cash in the immediate future.

 

Liquidity

 

As of June 30, 2022, the Company had cash and cash equivalents of a $8,981 as compared to $197,255 as of December 31, 2021, representing a decrease of $188,274. As of June 30, 2022, the Company had a working capital deficit of $1,461,912 as compared to a working capital deficit of $1,103,739 as of December 31, 2021, representing an increase in the deficit of $358,173. Plans with respect to its liquidity management include the following:

 

 6 

 

 

  The Company is seeking additional capital in the private and/or public equity markets to continue operations and build sales, marketing, brand and distribution. The Company is currently evaluating additional equity and debt financing opportunities and may execute them, if and when appropriate. However, there can be no assurances that the Company can consummate such a transaction or consummate a transaction at favorable pricing.

 

  The Company plans on increased sales of its products in the market. However, there can be no assurances that the sales will increase or that even if they do increase that it will increase sufficiently to generate the necessary cash.

 

NOTE 2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The accompanying financial statements of the Company have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) under the accrual basis of accounting. These financial statements are presented in U.S. dollars and are prepared on a historical cost basis, except for certain financial instruments which are carried at fair value. The accompanying unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements of the Company have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America and should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto for the years ended December 31, 2021 in the Form 10-K filed on April 6, 2022. In the opinion of management, all adjustments, consisting of normal recurring adjustments, necessary for a fair presentation of financial position and the results of operations for the interim periods presented have been reflected herein. The results of operations for the interim periods are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the full year. Notes to the condensed consolidated financial statements which would substantially duplicate the disclosures contained in the Form 10-K have been omitted.

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The consolidated financial statements include Real Brands, and its wholly owned subsidiaries. DePetrillo Real Estate Holdings, LLC is a wholly owned subsidiary of CASH and the owner of the Company’s building in Rhode Island. American Standard Hemp Inc. is a wholly owned subsidiary of CASH and holds the hemp licenses in Rhode Island. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated.

 

Use of estimates and judgments

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements and the reported amounts of expenses during the reporting period. Key areas of estimation include the estimated useful lives of property, plant, equipment and intangibles assets and liabilities, income taxes, and the valuation of stock-based compensation. Due to the uncertainty inherent in such estimates, actual results may differ from the Company’s estimates.

 

Accounting standard updates

 

From time to time, new accounting pronouncements are issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) or other standard setting bodies that are adopted by the Company as of the specified effective date. Unless otherwise discussed, the Company believes that the effect of recently issued standards that are not yet effective will not have a material effect on its consolidated financial position or results of operations upon adoption. 

 

Segment Reporting

 

The Company operates as one segment, in which management uses one measure of profitability, and all of the Company’s assets are located in the United States of America. The Company does not operate separate lines of business or separate business entities with respect to any of its product candidates. Accordingly, the Company does not have separately reportable segments.

 7 

 

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less when purchased to be a cash equivalent.

 

Accounts Receivable and Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

 

The Company performs periodic credit evaluations of its customers’ financial conditions and generally does not require collateral. The Company reviews all outstanding accounts receivable for collectability on a quarterly basis. An allowance for doubtful accounts is recorded for any amounts deemed uncollectable. The Company does not accrue interest receivable on past due accounts receivable.

 

Concentrations of Credit Risk

 

The Company, from time to time during the years covered by these consolidated financial statements, may have bank balances in excess of its insured limits. Management has deemed this a normal business risk.

 

Inventory

 

Inventory is comprised of raw hemp and hemp oil in different phases of production to completion of final product. Products include tinctures, creams and lotions. Inventory is valued at cost. No packaging material of any kind is included in inventory. Packaging materials are expensed as incurred.

 

Property and Equipment

 

On February 15, 2020 the Company purchased DePetrillo Real Estate Holdings, LLC, a Rhode Island Limited Liability Company having as it’s only asset the building at 12 Humbert Street in North Providence Rhode Island. The building is the Company’s headquarters and a hemp processing facility. The purchase price of the building was 2 million shares of CASH common stock, $25,000 in cash and the assumption of the mortgage which at the time was $189,916. The prior owner agreed to put the $25,000 payment into building improvements. The building and land were appraised at $475,000. The land alone was appraised at $23,750 and the building is appraised at $451,250. The building improvements are being depreciated over 15 years on a straight-line basis starting October 1, 2021, the date building improvements were completed. Depreciation expense on the building for the six months ended June 30, 2022 was $14,646.

 

Building improvements is being depreciated over 15 years commencing from the completion of the work, October 1, 2021. Depreciation expense on building improvements for the six months ended June 30, 2022 was $26,194.

  

Total depreciation expense for the three months ended June 30, 2022 was $40,840. Expenditures for repairs and maintenance are expensed as incurred.   

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

 

The Company reviews long-lived assets, including property and equipment, for impairment whenever events or changes in business circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the assets may not be fully recoverable. Factors that the Company considers in deciding when to perform an impairment review include significant underperformance of the business in relation to expectations, significant negative industry or economic trends, and significant changes or planned changes in the use of the assets. If an impairment review is performed to evaluate long-lived asset for recoverability, the Company compares forecasts of undiscounted cash flows expected to result from the use and eventual disposition of the long-lived asset to its carrying value. An impairment loss would be recognized when estimated undiscounted future cash flows expected to result from the use of an asset over its fair value, determined based on discounted cash flows is less than the carrying value on the books of the Company.

 

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Revenue Recognition

 

The Company follows, ASC 606 Revenue from Contracts with Customers which establishes a single and comprehensive framework and sets out how much revenue is to be recognized, and when. The core principle is that a vendor should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the vendor expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. Revenue will now be recognized by a vendor when control over the goods or services is transferred to the customer. In contrast, Revenue based revenue recognition is around an analysis of the transfer of risks and rewards; this now forms one of a number of criteria that are assessed in determining whether control has been transferred. The application of the core principle in ASC 606 is carried out in five steps: Step 1 – Identify the contract with a customer: a contract is defined as an agreement (including oral and implied), between two or more parties, that creates enforceable rights and obligations and sets out the criteria for each of those rights and obligations. The contract needs to have commercial substance and it is probable that the entity will collect the consideration to which it will be entitled. Step 2 – Identify the performance obligations in the contract: a performance obligation in a contract is a promise (including implicit) to transfer a good or service to the customer. Each performance obligation should be capable of being distinct and is separately identifiable in the contract. Step 3 – Determine the transaction price: transaction price is the amount of consideration that the entity can be entitled to, in exchange for transferring the promised goods and services to a customer, excluding amounts collected on behalf of third parties. Step 4 – Allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract: for a contract that has more than one performance obligation, the entity will allocate the transaction price to each performance obligation separately, in exchange for satisfying each performance obligation. The acceptable methods of allocating the transaction price include adjusted market assessment approach, expected cost plus a margin approach, and the residual approach in limited circumstances. Discounts given should be allocated proportionately to all performance obligations unless certain criteria are met and reallocation of changes in standalone selling prices after inception is not permitted. Step 5 – Recognize revenue as and when the entity satisfies a performance obligation: the entity should recognize revenue at a point in time, except if it meets any of the three criteria, which will require recognition of revenue over time: the entity’s performance creates or enhances an asset controlled by the customer, the customer simultaneously receives and consumes the benefit of the entity’s performance as the entity performs, and the entity does not create an asset that has an alternative use to the entity and the entity has the right to be paid for performance to date.

 

Stock-based Compensation

 

The Company expenses stock-based compensation to employees and consultants based on the fair value at grant date, which generally is the agreement date the Company entered into with employees or consultants. To date the Company has issued restricted common stock shares and preferred stock.

 

Beneficial Conversion Features of Convertible Securities

 

Conversion options that are not bifurcated as a derivative pursuant to ASC 815 and not accounted for as a separate equity component under the cash conversion guidance are evaluated to determine whether they are beneficial to the investor at inception (a beneficial conversion feature) or may become beneficial in the future due to potential adjustments. The beneficial conversion feature guidance in ASC 470-20 applies to convertible stock as well as convertible debt which are outside the scope of ASC 815. A beneficial conversion feature is defined as a nondetachable conversion feature that is in the money at the commitment date. The beneficial conversion feature guidance requires recognition of the conversion option’s in-the-money portion, the intrinsic value of the option, in equity, with an offsetting reduction to the carrying amount of the instrument. The resulting discount is amortized as a dividend over either the life of the instrument, if a stated maturity date exists, or to the earliest conversion date, if there is no stated maturity date. If the earliest conversion date is immediately upon issuance, the dividend must be recognized at inception. When there is a subsequent change to the conversion ratio based on a future occurrence, the new conversion price may trigger the recognition of an additional beneficial conversion feature on occurrence. 

 

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Derivatives

 

The Company reviews the terms of convertible debt issued to determine whether there are embedded derivative instruments, including embedded conversion options, which are required to be bifurcated and accounted for separately as derivative financial instruments. In circumstances where the host instrument contains more than one embedded derivative instrument, including the conversion option, that is required to be bifurcated, the bifurcated derivative instruments are accounted for as a single, compound derivative instrument.

 

Bifurcated embedded derivatives are initially recorded at fair value and are then revalued at each reporting date with changes in the fair value reported as non-operating income or expense. When the equity or convertible debt instruments contain embedded derivative instruments that are to be bifurcated and accounted for as liabilities, the total proceeds received are first allocated to the fair value of all the bifurcated derivative instruments. The remaining proceeds, if any, are then allocated to the host instruments themselves, usually resulting in those instruments being recorded at a discount from their face value. The discount from the face value of the convertible debt, together with the stated interest on the instrument, is amortized over the life of the instrument through periodic charges to interest expense.

 

Net Loss Per Common Share

 

Basic net loss per common share is computed by dividing net loss by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Potential common stock equivalents are determined using the treasury stock method. For diluted net loss per share purposes, the Company excludes stock options and other stock-based awards, including shares issued as a result of option exercises that are subject to repurchase by the Company, whose effect would be anti-dilutive from the calculation. During the six months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021, common stock equivalents were excluded from the calculation of diluted net loss per common share, as their effect was anti-dilutive due to the net loss incurred. Therefore, basic and diluted net loss per share was the same in all periods presented. 

 

The Company had 154,518,887 and 29,312,910 potentially dilutive options and convertible securities, respectively, that have been excluded from the computation of diluted weighted-average shares outstanding as of June 30, 2022, and 189,518,887 and 27,564,129 potentially dilutive options and convertible securities, respectively, that have been excluded from the computation of diluted weighted-average shares outstanding as of June 30, 2021, as they would be anti-dilutive. 

Treasury Stock

 

The Company accounts for treasury stock under the cost method and includes treasury stock as a component of stockholder’s deficit.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The guidance for fair value measurements, ASC 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, establishes the authoritative definition of fair value, sets out a framework for measuring fair value, and outlines the required disclosures regarding fair value measurements. Fair value is the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. The Company uses a three-tier fair value hierarchy based upon observable and non-observable inputs as follow:

 

   • Level 1 – Quoted market prices in active markets for identical assets and liabilities;

 

   • Level 2 – Inputs, other than level 1 inputs, either directly or indirectly observable; and

 

   • Level 3 – Unobservable inputs developed using internal estimates and assumptions (there is little or no market date) which reflect those that market participants would use.

 

The Company records its derivative activities at fair value. As of June 30, 2022, no derivative liabilities are recorded.

 

Off Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

The Company does not have any off-balance sheet arrangements.

 

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Uncertain Tax Positions

 

The Company did not take any uncertain tax positions and had no adjustments to unrecognized income tax liabilities or benefits pursuant to the provisions of Section 740-10-25 for the year ended December 31, 2021. 

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes under Section 740-10-30 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are determined based upon differences between the financial reporting and tax basis of assets and liabilities and are measured using the enacted tax rates and laws that will be in effect when the differences are expected to reverse. Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance to the extent management concludes it is more likely than not that the assets will not be realized. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in the consolidated statements of operations in the period that includes the enactment date. 

 

ASC 740 prescribes a comprehensive model for how companies should recognize, measure, present, and disclose in their financial statements uncertain tax positions taken or expected to be taken on a tax return. Under ASC 740, tax positions must initially be recognized in the financial statements when it is more likely than not the position will be sustained upon examination by the tax authorities. Such tax positions must initially and subsequently be measured as the largest amount of tax benefit that has a greater than 50% likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement with the tax authority assuming full knowledge of the position and relevant facts.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

The Company has reviewed all recently issued, but not yet effective, accounting pronouncements, and does not believe the future adoption of any such pronouncements may be expected to cause a material impact on its financial condition or the results of its operations.

 

In August 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-06, “Debt – Debt with Conversion and Other Options (Subtopic 470-20) and Derivatives and Hedging – Contracts in Entity’s Own Equity (Subtopic 815 – 40)” (“ASU 2020-06”). ASU 2020-06 simplifies the accounting for certain financial instruments with characteristics of liabilities and equity, including convertible instruments and contracts on an entity’s own equity. The ASU is part of the FASB’s simplification initiative, which aims to reduce unnecessary complexity in U.S. GAAP. The ASU’s amendments are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2023, and interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of ASU 2020-06 on its financial statements.

 

NOTE 3. ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLES AND ALLOWANCE FOR DOUBTFUL ACCOUNTS

 

At June 30, 2022 the Company has $0 in accounts receivables. The Company did not have an allowance for doubtful accounts at June 30, 2022. The Company does not accrue interest receivable on past due accounts receivable.

 

At December 31, 2021 the Company has $898 in accounts receivables. The Company did not have an allowance for doubtful accounts at December 31, 2021.

 

NOTE 4. PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

 

Property and equipment is comprised of a building, land, building improvements and furniture and equipment.

 

The building and land were appraised at $475,000. The building is being depreciated over 15 years on a straight-line basis starting October 1, 2021, the date the building improvements were completed on the building. Depreciation expense on the building for the six months ended June 30, 2022 was $14,646.

  

Building improvements is being depreciated over 15 years commencing from the completion of the work, October 1, 2021. Depreciation expense on building improvements for the six months ended June 30, 2022 was $26,194.

  

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Total depreciation expense for the six months ended June 30, 2022 was $40,840. Expenditures for repairs and maintenance are expensed as incurred.

       
   June 30,  December 31,
   2022  2021
       
Building  $475,000   $475,000 
Building Improvements   785,823    785,823 
Gross fixed assets   1,260,823    1,260,823 
Less: Accumulated Depreciation   (61,854   (21,014
Less: Impairments            
Net Fixed Assets  $1,198,970   $1,239,809 
           

 

NOTE 5. ACCOUNTS PAYABLE AND ACCRUED EXPENSES

 

Accounts payable and accrued expenses include normal operating expenses, professional fees and costs remaining to be paid for the build out of the new facility. Included in accrued expenses is a balance for ATS Indian Trace, LLC. ATS Indian Trace, LLC v. the Company was a civil action filed by ATS Indian Trace, LLC in the Circuit Court of Broward County, Florida on July 22, 2015. On November 18, 2015, a (default) Final Judgement was entered in favor of ATS Indian Trace, LLC and against the Company in the amount of $71,069. This judgement is currently outstanding and remains due and owing. ATS Indian Trace, LLC has not taken any enforcement action against the Company for several years and the Company does not believe we will ever have to pay it. The balance is included in accrued expenses. 

NOTE 6. ACCRUED EXPENSES – RELATED PARTY 

At June 30, 2022, accrued expenses related parties was $556,404.

 

At June 30, 2022, the Company owed its CEO, Thom Kidrin, $329,808 in accrued salary and $21,764 in accrued interest on a loan with principal balance of $188,605 and an additional $38,578 in accrued interest on a note from Worlds Inc., with a principal balance of $200,000. In addition, the Company owed $155,000 to its CFO, Chris Ryan, and $7,000 to Dr. Rammal. The balance, $4,254, is accrued payroll at June 30, 2022.

 

NOTE 7. NOTES PAYABLE AND MORTGAGES PAYABLE

 

On January 20, 2022, the Company entered into a purchase agreement with its former CEO Jerome Pearring in which the Company sold certain trademarks and its subsidiary Real brands Venture Group Inc. to Mr. Pearring and Mr. Pearring assumed certain notes and contingent liabilities and returned his Series A Preferred stock.

 

On May 12, 2022, the Company borrowed $25,000 from Providence Capital. The Company is accruing interest on the loan at 7%. Accrued interest on the loan at June 30, 2022 is $358.

 

As of June 30, 2022, the following mortgage was outstanding:

          
   Loan payable  Accrued interest
Mortgage payable   137,109      
Total  $137,109   $—  

 

Interest expense related to the mortgage payable amounted to $3,762 for the six months ended June 30, 2022.

 

NOTE 8. LOAN PAYABLE – RELATED PARTY

 

A loan was provided by the CEO, Thom Kidrin, at an interest rate of 7%. The loan balance at June 30, 2022 was $188,605 with accrued interest of $21,764

 

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NOTE 9. CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE - RELATED PARTY

 

The Company has issued a convertible note payable related party in the amount of $200,000.  The convertible note has a 7% annual interest rate and matured on October 15, 2021. Interest and principal are payable at maturity. The note can be converted at any time and either all or part of the amount due into equity at a price of $0.50 per share. If converted into common stock, the related party would own 1% of Company based upon the current number of shares outstanding. The related party holding the convertible note is Worlds Inc. Messrs. Kidrin, Toboroff and Christos are Directors of Worlds Inc. and Mr. Kidrin is the CEO and Mr. Ryan is the CFO of Worlds Inc. On October 15, 2021, the convertible note was extended to October 15, 2023.  All other terms remain the same.  As consideration for extending the maturity date 2 years, the Company is issuing one million warrants to purchase the Company’s stock at a purchase price $0.05 per share.

 

As of June 30, 2022, the Company incurred $38,578 in interest expense on the convertible note.

   

NOTE 10. STOCKHOLDERS EQUITY

 

Common Stock

 

The Company sold 3,111,111 shares with net proceeds of $65,000 through private placements during the six months ended June 30, 2022. The shares have not been issued as of June 30, 2022.

 

In March 2021, the Company sold 55,372,219 shares with net proceeds of $385,000 through private placements. In May 2021, the Company sold 15,714,287 shares with net proceeds of $550,000 through private placements. These shares were issued as of June 30, 2022

 

In the six months ended June 30, 2021, the Company issued 164,680,119 shares of common stock related to the reverse merger and 22,292,844 shares that were subscribed in 2020 but not yet issued at December 31, 2020.

 

As of June 30, 2022, the Company had 2,677,529,115 shares of its common stock outstanding.

 

Series A Preferred Stock

 

On January 20, 2022, the Company entered into a purchase agreement with its former CEO Jerome Pearring in which the Company sold certain trademarks and its subsidiary Real brands Venture Group Inc. to Mr. Pearring and Mr. Pearring assumed certain notes and contingent liabilities and returned to the Company his 1,000,000 shares of Series A Preferred stock for cancellation.

 

NOTE 11. STOCK OPTIONS

 

The Company has outstanding the following stock options as of June 30, 2022.

           
  Exercise Price per Share   Shares Under Option/warrant   Remaining Life in Years
Outstanding        
$ 0.011       4,000,000       3.00  
$ 0.0267       12,287,256       2.00  
$ 0.0267       92,154,421       3.50  
$ 0.0267       46,077,210       3.58  
Total         154,518,887          
Exercisable                    
$ 0.011       4,000,000       3.00  
$ 0.0267       12,287,256       2.00  
$ 0.0267       92,154,421       3.50  
$ 0.0267       46,077,210       3.58  
Total         154,518,887          

 

No stock options were granted during the six months ended June 30, 2022. All outstanding stock options are fully vested at June 30, 2022.

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NOTE 12. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

The Company is committed to an employment agreement with Thom Kidrin, its President and CEO. Mr. Kidrin entered into the employment agreement with CASH on November 26, 2018. The employment agreement provides for a base salary of $175,000 per year. Mr. Kidrin is entitled to participate in any stock, stock option or other equity participation plan and any profit-sharing, pension, retirement, insurance, or other employee benefit plan generally available to the executive officers of the Company.

 

CASH signed an Agreement and Plan of Merger with Purist Acquisition LLC, Purist LLC and Michael S. Metcalfe (“MSM”). Upon consummation of the Merger, CASH will receive ownership rights of all intellectual property related to Purist’s simulated moving bed chromatography technology and will be obligated to the following payments: (i) A cash payment of $90,000, (ii) A certificate representing Seven Hundred Fifty Thousand (750,000) shares of the Company’s Common Stock (or appropriate alternative arrangements if uncertificated shares of Seven Hundred Fifty Thousand (750,000) shares of Company Common Stock represented by book-entry shares will be issued), and (iv) An additional cash payment of Fifty Thousand Dollars ($50,000) to be paid as follows: Within thirty (30) days of its fiscal year end, the Company will deliver an amount equal to one (1%) percent of its net income up to a maximum payment of Fifty Thousand Dollars ($50,000). In the event one (1%) percent of the Company’s net income for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019, does not equal $50,000, then the process shall be repeated at the close of each successive fiscal year until such time as an aggregate of Fifty Thousand Dollars ($50,000) has been delivered to MSM. In addition, on the Closing of the Merger, Company shall enter into a consulting agreement with MSM providing for a monthly fee of $3,500 for a period of twelve (12) months. In connection with his consultancy, MSM will enter into (1) an assignment of inventions agreement assigning ownership rights of all intellectual property related to Purist’s simulated moving bed chromatography technology developed and/or created by MSM during the term of his consultancy and (2) a non-competition agreement pursuant to which MSM will agree to not compete with the Company during the term of his consultancy or within twelve (12) months after termination of his consultancy.  

 

NOTE 13. CONTINGENT LIABILITIES

 

During the six months ended June 30, 2022, the contingent liability to TBG Holdings was transferred to Jerome Pearring, the former CEO of the Company as part of the purchase agreement that transferred certain trademarks and its subsidiary Real brands Venture Group Inc. to Mr. Pearring and Mr. Pearring assumed certain notes and this contingent liability and returned to the Company his Series A Preferred stock.

 

NOTE 14.  SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

The Company has evaluated subsequent events through the filing of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and determined that there have been no events that have occurred that would require adjustments to our disclosures in the financial statements.

 

 

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ITEM 2.  MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Statements in this report which express "belief," “plan” "anticipation" or "expectation," as well as other similar or other statements which are not historical facts, are forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are subject to certain risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from historical results or anticipated results, including those that may be set forth below and elsewhere in this report. Examples of these uncertainties and risks include, but are not limited to:

   
access to sufficient debt or equity capital to meet our operating and financial needs;
the extent of dilution of the holdings of our existing stockholders upon the issuance, conversion or exercise of securities issued as part of our capital raising efforts;
the effectiveness and ultimate market acceptance of our products and our ability to generate sufficient sales revenues to sustain our growth and strategy plans;
whether our products in development will prove safe, feasible and effective;
legislation and changing regulatory rules directed at our industry;
whether and when we or any potential strategic partners will obtain required regulatory approvals in the markets in which we plan to operate;
our need to achieve manufacturing scale-up in a timely manner, and our need to provide for the efficient manufacturing of sufficient quantities of our products;
the lack of immediate alternate sources of supply for some critical components of our products;
our ability to establish and protect the proprietary information on which we base our products, including our patent and intellectual property position;
the need to fully develop the marketing, distribution, customer service and technical support and other functions critical to the success of our product lines;
the dependence on potential strategic partners or outside investors for funding, development assistance, clinical trials, distribution and marketing of some of our products;
other risks and uncertainties described from time to time in our publicly filed reports: and disruption in the economic and financial conditional primarily from the impact of past terrorist attacks in the United States, threat of future attacks, police and military activities overseas and other disruptive worldwide pandemic, political and economic events and environmental and weather conditions.

 

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and notes thereto included elsewhere in this report. 

 

OVERVIEW

 

The Company’s primary business is hemp CBD oil/isolate extraction, wholesaling of CBD oils and isolate, and production and sales of hemp-derived CBD consumer brands. The Company’s brand development strategy will be to leverage existing Company resources into creating online sales, licensing opportunities and a distribution network for proprietary legal hemp.

 

Current Operations 

The Company constructed a new, state-of-the-art facility in New Providence, Rhode Island that is equipped with our proprietary Halo 5 processing technology system (encompassing chemistry, mechanical engineering, and computer software) that produces a consistent 99% pure CBD distillate and isolate.

 

Marketing 

The market for consumer products produced with CBD derived from hemp is expected to increase substantially over the next five years, and we believe we are well positioned to be a significant player in this space. The Company is building a high-volume, low cost ingredient supply chain of consistent CBD distillate and isolate and believe that our proprietary technology system will allow us to be best positioned to protect gross margins in our wholesale ingredient supply business when more traditional commoditized pricing takes shape in the market over time. 

 

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Sales 

We intend to grow our business by launching multiple web-based platforms to educate and sell direct to consumers the Company’s owned and licensed brands that focus on CBD derived from hemp products and continuing to develop and expand our own proprietary branded retail line of products.

 

Product Development

 

Our HALO.5 Simulated Moving Bed Chromatography System (SMB) is an integrated 6-column SMB system designed for isolation and purification of chemical compounds at a high rate of productivity as compared to single column batch chromatography. The Company is extracting and refining essential oils and compounds of interest from certified hemp cultivars through the use of its proprietary processing technology and methodology. We currently work with qualified labs and contract formulators to formulate our products. We seek to create unique product formulas that will be recognized by consumers and the industry for their point of difference and efficacy of ingredients.

 

Competition

 

Our competition is primarily companies that manufacture and produce CBD derived from hemp consumer products. This is a broad market and encompasses startup companies and well-established companies with international brands. Despite the significant competition in this industry from larger, well-established and well-capitalized companies, we believe that the emerging nature of this industry, our consumer products experience and our ability to leverage the flexibility of a start-up may give us some advantages. Specifically, without a large organizational structure we expect to establish a broader product offering more quickly and in a cost-effective manner. There are no assurances, however, that we will ever be successful in effectively competing in this market segment.

 

Intellectual Property

 

Our HALO.5 Simulated Moving Bed Chromatography System (SMB) is an integrated 6-column SMB system designed for isolation and purification of chemical compounds at a high rate of productivity as compared to single column batch chromatography. It has powerful simulation software (Optional Ypso-Facto Chromworks®) as well as an integrated DAD UV/VIS photometric detectors that allow for rapid and accurate method development. All of this is combined with application support for specific applications such as cannabinoid isolation and mitigation. The HALO.5 is a powerful tool for rapid production of purified chemical compounds. We believe that through this device our products can be made more quickly, more purified, and less expensively than our competitors.

 

Government Regulation

 

We are subject to local and federal laws in our operating jurisdictions. A range of federal regulations govern our product development, manufacturing, distribution, sales and marketing, including the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (the “DSHEA”). 

 

CBD

 

Cannabinoids (CBD) are chemical compounds found in the cannabis plant. Hemp is a cannabis plant and where our CBD is derived from. CBD has been studied as to its therapeutic attributes. Taking CBD mimics and augments the effects of compounds in the body called endogenous cannabinoids. Endocannabinoids are part of the regulatory system called the endocannabinoid system. The endocannabinoid system plays important roles in the central nervous system and in regulating a broad range of physiological processes that affect our everyday experience – our mood, our energy level, our intestinal fortitude, immune activity, blood pressure, bone density, glucose metabolism, how we experience pain, stress, hunger, and more. Studies have shown that CBD is non-psychoactive unlike tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

  

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Farm Bill

 

On December 20, 2018, the 2018 Farm Bill was signed into law. The law went into effect on January 1, 2019.

 

As a consequence of the 2018 Farm Bill, hemp has now been permanently removed from the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). It is now deemed an agricultural commodity, no longer able to be classified as a controlled substance, like marijuana. Furthermore, by redefining hemp to include its “extracts, cannabinoids and derivatives,” Congress explicitly removed popular hemp products – such as hemp-derived CBD — from the purview of the CSA.

 

Accordingly, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) no longer has any claim to interfere with the interstate commerce of hemp products, so as long as the THC level is at or below 0.3%. State and Tribal governments may impose separate restrictions or requirements on hemp growth and the sale of hemp products. However, they cannot interfere with the interstate transport of hemp or hemp products.

 

We believe that the 2018 Farm Bill should give comfort to federally regulated institutions, pharmacies, banks, merchant services, credit card companies, e-commerce sites and advertising platforms, to conduct commerce with the hemp and hemp CBD industry

 

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on CBD and Hemp

 

The FDA’s statements regarding the 2018 Farm Bill noted the substantial public interest in CBD and the clear interest of Congress in fostering the development of appropriate hemp products. The FDA intends to hold a public meeting(s) in the near future for stakeholders to share their experiences and challenges with these products, including information and views related to the safety of such products.

The FDA appears committed to pursuing an efficient regulatory framework for allowing product developers that meet the requirements under their authorities to lawfully market these types of products. However, despite these steps by the FDA there are other factors which are beyond our control, which could jeopardize our ability to successfully market our planned products. Any such setback would have a material adverse effect on our business and prospects. 

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Our material accounting policies, which we believe are the most critical to investors understanding of our financial results and condition, are discussed below. Because we are still early in our enterprise development, the number of these policies requiring explanation is limited. As we begin to generate increased revenue from different sources, we expect that the number of applicable policies and complexity of the judgments required will increase.

 

Revenue Recognition: ASC 606 Revenue from Contracts with Customers establishes a single and comprehensive framework which sets out how much revenue is to be recognized, and when. The core principle is that a vendor should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the vendor expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. Revenue will now be recognized by a vendor when control over the goods or services is transferred to the customer. In contrast, Revenue based revenue recognition around an analysis of the transfer of risks and rewards; this now forms one of a number of criteria that are assessed in determining whether control has been transferred. The application of the core principle in ASC 606 is carried out in five steps: Step 1 – Identify the contract with a customer: a contract is defined as an agreement (including oral and implied), between two or more parties, that creates enforceable rights and obligations and sets out the criteria for each of those rights and obligations. The contract needs to have commercial substance and it is probable that the entity will collect the consideration to which it will be entitled. Step 2 – Identify the performance obligations in the contract: a performance obligation in a contract is a promise (including implicit) to transfer a good or service to the customer. Each performance obligation should be capable of being distinct and is separately identifiable in the contract. Step 3 – Determine the transaction price: transaction price is the amount of consideration that the entity can be entitled to, in exchange for transferring the promised goods and services to a customer, excluding amounts collected on behalf of third parties. Step 4 – Allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract: for a contract that has more than one performance obligation, the entity will allocate the transaction price to each performance obligation separately, in exchange for satisfying each performance obligation. The acceptable methods of allocating the transaction price include adjusted market assessment approach, expected cost plus a margin approach, and, the residual approach in limited circumstances. Discounts given should be allocated proportionately to all performance obligations unless certain criteria are met and reallocation of changes in standalone selling

 17 

 

prices after inception is not permitted. Step 5 – Recognize revenue as and when the entity satisfies a performance obligation: the entity should recognize revenue at a point in time, except if it meets any of the three criteria, which will require recognition of revenue over time: the entity’s performance creates or enhances an asset controlled by the customer, the customer simultaneously receives and consumes the benefit of the entity’s performance as the entity performs, and the entity does not create an asset that has an alternative use to the entity and the entity has the right to be paid for performance to date.

Valuation of Deferred Taxes: We account for income taxes in accordance with the liability method. Under the liability method, we recognize deferred assets and liabilities based upon anticipated future tax consequences attributable to differences between financial statement carrying amounts of assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. We establish a valuation allowance to the extent that it is more likely than not that deferred tax assets will not be utilized against future taxable income.

Valuation of Equity Instruments Granted to Employee, Service Providers and Investors: On the date of issuance, the instruments are recorded at their fair value as determined using the Binomial Option Pricing Model. 

Allowance for Accounts Receivable: We estimate losses from the inability of our distributors to make required payments and periodically review the payment history of each of our distributors, as well as their financial condition, and revise our reserves as a result.

Inventory Valuation: All inventories are stated at lower of cost or net realizable value, with cost determined substantially on a “first-in, first-out” basis. Selling, general, and administrative expenses are not inventoried, but are charged to expense when purchased.

 

 

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Three months ended June 30, 2022 compared to three months ended June 30, 2021

 

Sales Revenue, Cost of Sales and Gross Loss:

Revenues from the sale of our products for the three months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021 were $757 and $1,084, respectively. Revenues in 2022 were generated from the sale of our tinctures.

 

Costs of sales was $150 in the three months ended June 30, 2022 and $28,881in the three months ended June 30, 2021. The Company expenses all packaging material as a cost of sale at the time of purchase. For the three months ended June 30, 2022, the Company had a gross profit of $607 compared to a gross loss of $27,797 for the three months ended June 30, 2021.

 

General and Administrative Expense: General and administrative expenses for the three months ended June 30, 2022, increased by $58,517, to $103,267 as compared to $44,750 for the three months ended June 30, 2021. The increase is due to a general increase in activity as our production facility build out has been completed and we have started production.

 

Payroll and Related: Payroll and related increased by $37,217 to $103,915 for the three months ended June 30, 2022 from $66,698 for the three months ended June 30, 2021. The increase is due to an increase in activity as our production facility has been built out and production has started up.

 

Professional Fees: Professional fees decreased to $12,680 for the three months ended June 30, 2022 compared to $84,750 for the three months ended June 30, 2021. The decrease is due to a decrease in costs associated with making the Company compliant with its reporting responsibilities in prior years.

 

Stock option expense: Stock option expense was $0 for the three months ended June 30, 2022 compared to $1,065,390 for the three months ended June 30, 2021.

 

Gain on forgiveness of PPP Loan: The Company applied for and received forgiveness on one of the SBA PPP loans in the amount of $36,825 for the three months ended June 30, 2021. All of the PPP loans were forgiven in 2021.

 

Depreciation expense: Depreciation expense was $20,618 for the three months ended June 30, 2022 compared to a depreciation expense of $36,298 for the three months ended June 30, 2021.

 

 18 

 

Interest Expense: Interest expense for the three months ended June 30, 2022 was $6,798 compared to interest expense of $6,063 in the three months ended June 30, 2021.

 

Net Loss: As a result of the foregoing, we realized a net loss of $246,672 in the three months ended June 30, 2022 compared to a net loss of $1,282,796 for the three months ended June 30, 2021.

 

There was no income tax benefit recorded for the year ended December 31, 2021 or 2020, due to recurring net operating losses.

 

 

Six months ended June 30, 2022 compared to six months ended June 30, 2021

 

Sales Revenue, Cost of Sales and Gross Loss:

Revenues from the sale of our products for the six months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021 were $7,610 and $1,545, respectively. Revenues in 2022 were generated from the sale of our tinctures.

 

Costs of sales was $7,507 in the six months ended June 30, 2022 and $55,191 in the six months ended June 30, 2021. The Company expenses all packaging material as a cost of sale at the time of purchase. For the six months ended June 30, 2022, the Company had a gross profit of $103 compared to a gross loss of $53,646 for the six months ended June 30, 2021.

 

General and Administrative Expense: General and administrative expenses for the six months ended June 30, 2022, increased by $57,536, to $226,354 as compared to $168,818 for the six months ended June 30, 2021. The increase is due to a general increase in activity as our production facility has been completely built out and we have started production.

 

Payroll and Related: Payroll and related increased by $82,928 to $209,112 for the six months ended June 30, 2022 from $126,184 for the six months ended June 30, 2021.

 

Professional Fees: Professional fees decreased to $23,900 from $175,015 for the six months ended June 30, 2022. The decrease is due to a decrease in costs associated with making the Company compliant with its reporting responsibilities in prior years.

 

Stock option expense: Stock option expense was $0 for the six months ended June 30, 2022 compared to $1,065,390 for the six months ended June 30, 2021.

 

Gain on forgiveness of PPP Loan: The Company applied for and received forgiveness on its two SBA PPP loans in the amount of $143,485 for the six months ended June 30, 2021. Having no further PPP loans, the amount was $0 for the six months ended June 30, 2022.

 

Depreciation expense: Depreciation expense was $40,840 for the six months ended June 30, 2022 compared to a depreciation expense of $72,596 for the six months ended June 30, 2021.

 

Interest Expense: Interest expense for the six months ended June 30, 2022 was $12,675 an increase of $577 from the interest expense of $12,098 in the six months ended June 30, 2021.

 

Net Loss: As a result of the foregoing, we realized a net loss of $512,777 in the six months ended June 30, 2022

compared to a net loss of $1,530,261 for the six months ended June 30, 2021.

 

 19 

 

 

 

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

 

Since our inception, we have raised capital through the public and private sale of debt and equity and funding from collaborative arrangements. At June 30, 2022, we had cash of $8,981 and a negative working capital of $1,461,912.

 

We will be required to raise additional funds through public or private financing, additional collaborative relationships or other arrangements. We cannot be certain that our existing and available capital resources will be sufficient to satisfy our funding requirements through 2022. We are evaluating various options to raise additional funds, including new equity and loans and no assurance can be given that we will be successful.

 

Our financial statements have been prepared and presented on a basis assuming we will continue as a going concern. The above factors raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern, as more fully discussed in Note 1 to the condensed consolidated financial statements contained herein.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We have no material off-balance sheet arrangements, no special purpose entities, and no activities that include non-exchange-traded contracts accounted for at fair value. 

 

Item 4. Controls And Procedures

 

As of June 30, 2022, we carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as such term is defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended). Based upon that evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of June 30, 2022.

 

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

During the quarter covered by this report there were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting (as such term is defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended) that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

 

 20 

 

 

PART II OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings

 

None. 

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors

We are not obligated to disclose our risk factors in this report, however, limited information regarding our risk factors appears in Part I, Item 2. “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” under the caption “Forward-Looking Statements” contained in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and in “Item 1A. RISK FACTORS” of our 2021 Annual Report on Form 10-K. There have been no material changes from the risk factors previously disclosed in our 2021 Annual Report on Form 10-K. 

 

Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

The Company sold 3,111,111 shares with net proceeds of $65,000 through private placements during the six months ended June 30, 2022. The shares have not been issued as of June 30, 2022.

 

Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities

None.

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosure

Not applicable. 

Item 5. Other Information 

None. 

 21 

 

Item 6. Exhibits

 

  3.1     Certificate of Incorporation (a)
         
  3.2     By-Laws Restated as Amended (a)
         
  31.1     Certification of Chief Executive Officer
         
  31.2     Certification of Chief Financial Officer
         
  32.1     Statement required by 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
         
  32.2     Statement required by 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
         
   101. INS*XBRL    Instance Document
         
  101. SCH*XBRL    Taxonomy Extension Schema
         
  101. CAL*XBRL    Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase
         
  101. DEF*XBRL    Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase
         
  101. LAB*XBRL    Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase
         
  101. PRE*XBRL    Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase

 

(a) Filed previously with the Form 10 on June 25, 2021 and incorporated herein by reference.

 

   

 22 

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

In accordance with the requirements of the Exchange Act, the Registrant caused this Report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereto duly authorized.

 

Date: August 12, 2022

 

REAL BRANDS, INC.

 

By: /s/ Thom Kidrin    
President and CEO    
     
By: /s/ Christopher Ryan    
Chief Financial Officer    

 

 

 23 

 

 

EXHIBIT 31.1  

 

Certifications

I, Thomas Kidrin, certify that: 

1. I have reviewed this quarterly report on Form 10-Q of Real Brands, Inc.;  

2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report; 

3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;

4. The registrant's other certifying officer and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal controls over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) for the registrant and have: 

a) Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared; 

b) Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles; 

c) Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant's disclosure controls and procedures, and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and

d) Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant's internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant's most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant's internal control over financial reporting; and 

5. The registrant's other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant's auditors and the audit committee of registrant's board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions): 

a) all significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant's ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and

b) any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant's internal control over financial reporting. 

Date: August 12, 2022

/s/ Thomas Kidrin

Thomas Kidrin

Chief Executive Officer 

   

 

EXHIBIT 31.2 

 

Certifications

I, Christopher J. Ryan, certify that:

1. I have reviewed this quarterly report on Form 10-Q of Real Brands, Inc.;  

2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report; 

3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;

4. The registrant's other certifying officer and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal controls over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) for the registrant and have: 

a) Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared; 

b) Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles; 

c) Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant's disclosure controls and procedures, and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and

d) Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant's internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant's most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant's internal control over financial reporting; and 

5. The registrant's other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant's auditors and the audit committee of registrant's board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions): 

a) all significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant's ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and

b) any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant's internal control over financial reporting.

 

Date: August 12, 2022

/s/ Christopher J. Ryan

Christopher J. Ryan

Chief Financial Officer

 

   

 

Exhibit 32.1

  

CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO

18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350

AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO

SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

 

In connection with the Quarterly Report of Real Brands, Inc. (the "Company") on Form 10-Q for the six months ended June 30, 2022 as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on the date hereof (the "Report"), I, Thomas Kidrin, Chief Executive Officer of the Company, certifies, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 1350, as adopted pursuant to §906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, that, based on my knowledge: 

 

  (1)   The Report fully complies with the requirements of Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; and

 

  (2)   The information contained in the Report fairly presents, in all material respects, our financial condition and result of operations.

 

  REAL BRANDS, INC.
  (Registrant)
   
Date: August 12, 2022 By:/s/ Thomas Kidrin
  Thomas Kidrin
  Chief Executive Officer 

 

   

 

Exhibit 32.2 

 

CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO

18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350

AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO

SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

 

In connection with the Quarterly Report of Real Brands, Inc. (the "Company") on Form 10-Q for the six months ended June 30, 2022 as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on the date hereof (the "Report"), I, Christopher J. Ryan, Chief Financial Officer of the Company, certifies, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 1350, as adopted pursuant to §906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, that, based on my knowledge: 

  (1)   The Report fully complies with the requirements of Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; and

 

  (2)   The information contained in the Report fairly presents, in all material respects, our financial condition and result of operations.

  

  REAL BRANDS, INC.
  (Registrant)
   
Date: August 12, 2022 By:/s/ Christopher J. Ryan
  Christopher J. Ryan
  Chief Financial Officer

 

   



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