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Form 10-Q GJ Culture Group US, For: Jun 30

August 15, 2022 1:58 PM EDT

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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

QUARTERLY REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2022

 

TRANSITION REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT

 

For the transition period from ____________ to ______________

 

Commission file number: 000-56140

 

GJ Culture Group US, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Nevada   83-2912878

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(IRS Employer

Identification No.)

 

4125 Blackhawk Plaza Circle, Suite 166

Danville, CA 94506

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(925) 362-3169

(Registrant’s telephone number)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class   Trading Symbol(s)   Name of each exchange on which registered
Common   GJCU   OTCQB

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filers,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer Accelerated filer
Non-accelerated filer Smaller reporting company
    Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ☐ No

 

The number of shares outstanding of the Registrant’s Common Stock as of June 30, 2022 was 42,959,574 shares, $0.0001 par value.

 

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

GJ Culture Group US, Inc.

 

FORM 10-Q

 

Quarterly Period Ended June 30, 2022

 

INDEX

 

    Page
PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION  
     
Item 1. Financial Statements 2
  Balance Sheets as of June 30, 2022 and December 31, 2021 3
  Statement of Operations and Comprehensive Loss for the periods ended June 30, 2022 and 2021 4
  Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for the periods ended June 30, 2022 and 2021 5
  Statement of Cash Flows for the periods ended June 30, 2022 and 2021 6
  Notes to Financial Statements 7
Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 11
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 15
Item 4. Controls and Procedures 16
     
PART II. OTHER INFORMATION  
     
Item 1. Legal Proceedings 18
Item 1A. Risk Factors 18
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds 18
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities 18
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 18
Item 5. Other Information 18
Item 6. Exhibits 18
     
SIGNATURES 19

  

2

 

 

GJ Culture Group US, Inc.

Balance Sheets

June 30, 2022 and December 31, 2021

(Unaudited)

 

         
   June 30,   December 31 
   2022   2021 
   (Unaudited)   (Audited) 
ASSETS        
         
Current assets          
Cash and cash equivalents  $575    27,986 
Prepaid Expenses   16,460    10,425 
Total assets  $17,035    38,411 
           
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY          
           
Current liabilities          
Accounts payables  $3,877    - 
Accrued liabilities   5,000    239 
           
Total liabilities  $8,877    239 
           
Commitments and Contingencies   -    - 
           
Stockholders’ Equity          
Preferred stock, $0.0001 par value, 30,000,000 shares authorized, no shares issued and outstanding as of June 30, 2022 and December 31, 2021  $-    - 
Common stock, $0.0001 par value, 320,000,000 shares authorized, 42,959,574 shares issued and outstanding as of June 30, 2022 and December 31, 2021   4,296    4,296 
Additional Paid in Capital   360,330    360,330 
Accumulated deficit   (356,468)   (326,454)
Total stockholders’ equity   8,158    38,172 
           
Total liabilities and stockholders’ deficit  $17,035    38,411 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements

 

3

 

 

GJ Culture Group US, Inc.

Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss

For the six month and three months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021

(Unaudited)

 

                     
   For the six months ended   For the three months ended 
   June 30,   June 30, 
   2022   2021   2022   2021 
Revenue  $14,982   $-   $14,982   $- 
                     
General and administrative expenses   44,997    76,989    13,905    52,744 
Profit/(Loss) from operation   (30,015)   (76,989)   1,077    (52,744)
                     
Profit/(Loss) before provision for income taxes   (30,015)   (76,989)   1,077    (52,744)
                     
Interest income   1    3    1    1 
Total other income/(expenses)   1    3    1    1 
                     
Provision for income taxes   -    -    -    - 
                     
Net profit / (loss)  $(30,014)  $(76,986)  $1,078   $(52,743)
                     
Comprehensive loss  $(30,014)  $(76,986)  $1,078   $(52,743)
                     
Basic and diluted loss per common share  $-   $-   $-   $- 
                     
Weighted average number of common shares used in per share calculations – basic and diluted   42,959,574    42,959,574    42,959,574    42,959,574 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements

 

4

 

 

GJ Culture Group US, Inc.

Statements of Stockholders’ Equity

For the six months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021

(Unaudited)

 

                     
   Number of Shares   Common   Additional Paid in   Accumulated   Total
Stockholders’
 
   Outstanding   Stock   Capital   Deficit   Equity 
                     
Balance – December 31, 2021   42,959,574   $4,296   $360,330   $(326,454)  $38,172 
                          
Net loss   -   $-   $-   $(30,014)  $(30,014)
                          
Balance – June 30, 2022   42,959,574   $4,296   $360,330   $(356,468)  $8,158 
                          
Balance – December 31, 2020   42,959,574   $4,296   $360,330    (260,777)   103,849 
                          
Net loss   -   $-   $-   $(76,986)  $(76,986)
                          
Balance – June 30, 2021   42,959,574   $4,296   $360,330   $(337,763)  $          26,863 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements

 

5

 

 

GJ Culture Group US, Inc.

Statements of Cash Flows

For the six months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021

(Unaudited)

 

           
   For the six months ended
June 30,
 
   2022   2021 
         
Cash flows used in operating activities          
Net loss  $(30,014)  $(76,986)
           
Increase / (Decreased) in Prepaid Expenses   (6,035)   - 
Increase in Accounts Payable   3,530    - 
Increase / (Decreased) in Accrued Liabilities   5,108    (897)
Net cash used in operating activities   (27,411)   (77,883)
           
Change in cash and cash equivalents   (27,411)   (77,883)
           
Cash and cash equivalents – Beginning of period   27,986    118,611 
           
Cash and cash equivalents – End of period  $575   $40,728 
           
Interest paid  $-   $- 
Income tax paid  $-   $- 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements

 

6

 

 

GJ Culture Group US, Inc.

Notes to Financial Statements

 

1. NATURE OF OPERATIONS

 

GJ Culture Group US, Inc. (the “Company”) is a for profit corporation established under the corporation laws in the State of Nevada, United States of America on December 20, 2018. The Company was originally incorporated as “Guojiang Cultural Industry US, Inc.” and amended the name to “GJ Culture Group US, Inc.” on February 20, 2019. Unless the context otherwise requires, all references to “GJ Culture Group US, Inc.,” “we,” “us,” “our” or the “company” are to GJ Culture Group US, Inc.

 

The Company is dedicated to providing educational services based on classical Chinese studies and culture. The Company’s goal is to serve as cultural and educational meeting point between China and the U.S. The Company will pursue its business objective by providing education and training courses based on classical Chinese studies, organizing China-U.S. international study tour activities for participants of all ages, as well as organizing and promoting China-U.S. cultural events, art fairs, exhibitions, and other activities promoting Chinese culture.

 

2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The accompanying unaudited condensed interim financial statements have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles for interim financial information and in accordance with the instructions to Article 8 of Regulation S-X. In our opinion, all adjustments (consisting of normal recurring adjustments) considered necessary for a fair presentation have been included. Operating results for the six months ended June 30, 2022 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year ending December 31, 2022. Notes to the unaudited condensed interim financial statements that would substantially duplicate the disclosures contained in the audited financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2021 have been omitted. This report should be read in conjunction with the audited financial statements and the footnotes thereto for the year ended December 31, 2021 included in the Company’s Form 10K as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

Going Concern

 

The accompanying financial statements and notes have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As of June 30, 2022, the Company had accumulated deficits of $356,468. The Company’s ability to continue as a going concern is dependent upon the Company’s ability to generate sufficient revenues to operate profitably or raise additional capital through debt financing and/or through sales of common stock.

 

Management plans to fund operations of the Company through the proceeds from an offering pursuant to a Registration Statement on Form S-1, private placements of restricted securities, or the issuance of stock in lieu of cash for payment of services until such a time as profitable operations are achieved. If we do not raise all of the money we need from public offerings, we will have to find alternative sources, such as loans or advances from our officers, directors or others. Such additional financing may not become available on acceptable terms and there can be no assurance that any additional financing that the Company does obtain will be sufficient to meet its needs in the long term. There are no written agreements in place for such funding or issuance of securities and there can be no assurance that such will be available in the future. Management believes that this plan provides an opportunity for the Company to continue as a going concern.

 

The failure to achieve the necessary levels of profitability or obtain the additional funding would be detrimental to the Company.

 

7

 

 

Use of Estimates and Assumptions

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Due to the limited level of operations, the Company has not needed to make material assumptions or estimates other than the assumption that the Company is a going concern.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less when purchased to be cash equivalents.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

ASC 825, “Disclosures about Fair Value of Financial Instruments”, requires disclosure of fair value information about financial instruments. ASC 820, “Fair Value Measurements” defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value in generally accepted accounting principles, and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. Fair value estimates discussed herein are based upon certain market assumptions and pertinent information available to management at the time of this report.

 

The respective carrying values of certain on-balance-sheet financial instruments approximate their fair values. These financial instruments include cash, accrued liabilities and notes payable. Fair values were assumed to approximate carrying values for these financial instruments since they are short term in nature and their carrying amounts approximate fair value.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company will recognize revenue in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification No. 606, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers” (“ASC-606”). ASC-606 requires that the criteria must be met before revenue can be recognized:

 

1.The parties to the contract have approved the contract (in writing, orally, or in accordance with other customary business practices) and are committed to perform their respective obligations.
2.The Company can identify each party’s rights regarding the goods or services to be transferred.
3.The Company can identify the payment terms for the goods or services to be transferred.
4.The contract has commercial substance (that is, the risk, timing, or amount of the entity’s future cash flows is expected to change as a result of the contract).
5.It is probable that the Company will collect substantially all of the consideration to which it will be entitled in exchange for the goods or services that will be transferred to the customer. In evaluating whether collectability of an amount of consideration is probable, an entity shall consider only the customer’s ability and intention to pay that amount of consideration when it is due. The amount of consideration to which the entity will be entitled may be less than the price stated in the contract if the consideration is variable because the entity may offer the customer a price concession.

 

There were no outstanding unfulfilled revenue contracts as of June 30, 2022.

 

8

 

 

Basic and Diluted Net Loss Per Share

 

Our computation of earnings per share (“EPS”) includes basic and diluted EPS. Basic EPS is measured as the income (loss) available to common stockholders divided by the weighted average common shares outstanding for the period. Diluted income (loss) per share reflects the potential dilution, using the treasury stock method, that could occur if securities or other contracts to issue common stock were exercised or converted into common stock or resulted in the issuance of common stock that then shared in the income (loss) of the Company as if they had been converted at the beginning of the periods presented, or issuance date, if later. In computing diluted income (loss) per share, the treasury stock method assumes that outstanding options and warrants are exercised and the proceeds are used to purchase common stock at the average market price during the period. Options and warrants may have a dilutive effect under the treasury stock method only when the average market price of the common stock during the period exceeds the exercise price of the options and warrants. Potential common shares that have an anti-dilutive effect (i.e., those that increase income per share or decrease loss per share) are excluded from the calculation of diluted EPS.

 

Income (loss) per common share is computed by dividing net income (loss) by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the respective periods. Basic and diluted (loss) per common share is the same for periods in which the company reported an operating loss because all warrants and stock options outstanding are anti-dilutive. There were no adjustments to net loss required for purposes of computing diluted earnings per share.

  

           
  

For the period ended

June 30

 
   2022   2021 
Loss per share:          
Numerator:          
Net loss used in computing earnings per share  $30,014   $76,986 
           
Denominator:          
Weighted average common shares outstanding   42,959,574    42,959,574 
           
Basic and diluted loss per share  $(0.00)  $(0.00)

 

The Company has no potentially dilutive securities, such as options or warrants, currently issued and outstanding.

 

Comprehensive income (loss)

 

The Company follows the provisions of the Financial Accounting Standards Board (the “FASB”) ASC 220 Reporting Comprehensive Income and establishes standards for the reporting and display of comprehensive income, its components and accumulated balances in a full set of general purpose financial statements. The Company’s comprehensive loss consists of net loss and foreign currency translation adjustments.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

 

In February 2018, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update No. 2018-02 Reclassification of Certain Tax Effects from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (ASU 2018-02). The standard provides financial statement preparers with an option to reclassify stranded tax effects within Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (AOCI) to retained earnings in each period in which the effect of the change in the U.S. federal corporate income tax rate in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (or portion thereof) is recorded. ASU 2018-02 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted.

 

9

 

 

In December 2018, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update No. 2018-05, Income Taxes (Topic 740), Amendments to SEC Paragraphs Pursuant to SEC Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 118 (ASU 2018-05). The ASU adds various Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) paragraphs pursuant to the issuance of the December 2017 SEC Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 118, Income Tax Accounting Implications of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“SAB 118”), which was effective immediately. The SEC issued SAB 118 to address concerns about reporting entities’ ability to timely comply with the accounting requirements to recognize all of the effects of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act in the period of enactment. SAB 118 allows disclosure that timely determination of some or all of the income tax effects from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act are incomplete by the due date of the financial statements and if possible, to provide a reasonable estimate.

 

As of June 30, 2022, except for the above, there are no recently issued accounting standards not yet adopted that would have a material effect on the Company’s financial statements.

 

3. INCOME TAX

 

The Company was established in the State of Nevada in United States and is subject to Nevada State and US Federal tax laws. The Company has not recognized an income tax benefit for its operating losses based on uncertainties concerning its ability to generate taxable income in future periods. The tax benefit for the periods presented is offset by a valuation allowance established against deferred tax assets arising from the net operating losses and other temporary differences, the realization of which could not be considered more likely than not. Further, the benefit from utilization of NOL (“net operating loss”) carry forwards could be subject to limitations due to material ownership changes that could occur in the Company as it continues to raise additional capital. Based on such limitations, the Company has significant NOLs for which realization of tax benefits is uncertain. In future periods, tax benefits and related deferred tax assets will be recognized when management considers realization of such amounts to be more likely than not.

 

As of June 30, 2022, and December 31, 2021, the Company has accumulated net operating losses of $356,468 and $326,454. The Company has elected to not recognize deferred tax assets resulting from the NOLs, as Management is not yet able to reliably estimate when the Company will generate profits that would enable the Company to make use of such potential future tax benefits. Management continually assesses it future earnings potential and related tax impacts. If circumstances change in the future that will enable Management to accurately forecast future profits, the Company may elect to recognize such tax assets.

 

4. SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

The Company has evaluated subsequent events that have occurred after the date of the balance sheet through the August 15, 2022 and determined that no subsequent events require recognition or disclosure to the financial statements.

 

10

 

 

ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS

OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

This discussion contains forward-looking statements about our business and operations. Our actual results may differ materially from those we currently anticipate as a result of many factors, including those we described under “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this prospectus. Certain statements contained in this discussion, including, without limitation, statements containing the words “believes,” “anticipates,” “expects” and the like, constitute “forward-looking statements.” However, as we will issue “penny stock,” as such term is defined in Rule 3a51-1 promulgated under the Exchange Act, we are ineligible to rely on these safe harbor provisions. Such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any of the future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Given these uncertainties, readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such forward-looking statements. We disclaim any obligation to update any of such factors or to announce publicly the results of revision of any of the forward-looking statements contained herein to reflect future events or developments. For information regarding risk factors that could have a material adverse effect on our business, refer to the “Risk Factors” section of this prospectus beginning on page 3.

 

Overview

 

GJ Culture Group US, Inc. (“GJ Culture” “the Company”, “we”, “us” or “our”) is an emerging company incorporated in Nevada and is qualified and authorized to transact intestate business in California. We are dedicated to providing educational services based on classical Chinese studies and culture. We aim to serve as a cultural and educational meeting point between China and the U.S. Our business is providing education and training courses based on classical Chinese studies both in Chinese and English, organizing China-U.S. international study tour activities for participants of all ages, and organizing and promoting China-U.S. cultural events, art fairs, and exhibitions and other relevant activities related to educating the public about Chinese culture.

 

Our executive office is located in Danville, the State of California, U.S. Additionally; we have cooperative agencies in California and China. We have established a cooperative relationship with Shaanxi Guojiang Cultural Industry Group Co. Ltd (“Guojiang China”), which is an affiliated company of GJ Culture based in Shaanxi, China and also engages in business related to Chinese classical education. We intend through our cooperative partners to enter into contracts for cooperation with experts in various fields of traditional Chinese culture and art; to offer a diverse and systematic array of services related to Chinese classical studies, that cover the demand of the American market. We will focus on education and the cultural exchange between China and the U.S. relying on our experience in the field of Chinese classical culture and art. We intend to capitalize on the growing interest in China and on its increasing global influence. We will do this by offering a curated and systematized curriculum of classical Chinese studies, and contribute to the exchange and development of cultural education and art between China and the U.S.

 

GJ Culture is committed to becoming a professional service institution of education, specifically in classical Chinese studies, culture and art. Classical studies and art are at the core of our services. We will offer international study tours, online and offline, in classical Chinese studies through classes, lectures, cultural, and artistic events. All of these will enrich, elevate and complement each other, forming a vertically integrated set of products and services with growth potential.

 

There is a growing global interest in China, and an increasing demand to learn more about the Chinese culture and language. We believe it is because the market for classical Chinese studies education and training in the U.S. exists, but it is still in an early stage of development. Based on the market search results by Zero Power Intelligence Research Institute as described in previous chapter, we estimate that this industry presents large training needs, many business opportunities and potential profit margins.

 

We plan to generate most of the revenue through provision of classical studies lectures, international study tour services, classical studies education and training, and organizing cultural and artistic events. All of these services will be paid for by our students or participants in advance.

 

General

 

Revenues are comprised of providing promotions and consulting services to our partner who gives international study tour services and, commission to be received from partner enrollment services.

 

Our general and administrative expenses consist of costs related to marketing, selling, personnel cost, and professional fee to law firm and accounting firm, etc.

 

11

 

 

Results of Operations

 

Six months ended June 30, 2022, and 2021

 

The following table sets forth key components of our results of operations for the periods indicated:

 

   For the six months ended 
   June 30, 
   2022   2021 
Revenues  $14,982   $- 
Cost of revenues   -    - 
Gross profit        - 
Selling, general and administrative expense   44,997    76,989 
Interest income, net   1    (3)
Income/(loss) before income taxes   (30,014)   (76,986)
Income tax expense   -    - 
Net loss  $(30,014)  $(76,986)

 

Revenues

 

We report $14,982 in revenue in the reporting period. Revenues are comprised of promotion and consulting services rendered to our partner who provides international study tour services.

 

Cost of Revenues

 

There is no cost of revenue that occurred during the period.

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses

 

We recorded $44,997 in selling, general and administrative expenses in the reporting period, and it mainly consists of professional service from our law firm, auditor and accountant, etc.

 

Our selling, general and administrative expenses decreased by US$31,992 or 42% from US$76,989 for the first half of 2021 to US$44,997 for the same period of 2022. The decrease was primarily attributable to the decrease of the professional service fee.

 

12

 

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

We plan to fund operations of the Company through the proceeds from public offerings, private placements of restricted securities, or the issuance of stock in lieu of cash for payment of services until profitable operations are achieved. If we do not raise all of the money we need from public offerings or through private placements, we will have to find alternative sources, such as loans or advances from our officers, directors or others. Such additional financing may not become available on acceptable terms and there can be no assurance that any additional financing that the Company obtains will be sufficient to meet its needs in the long term. There are no written agreements in place for such funding or issuance of securities and there can be no assurance that such will be available in the future. We believe that this plan provides an opportunity for the Company to continue as a going concern.

 

The failure to achieve the necessary levels of profitability or obtain additional funding would be detrimental to the Company.

 

Cash Flows

 

The following table presents the major components of net cash flows used in and provided by operating, investing and financing activities for the periods presented:

 

Six months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021

 

   For the six months ended 
   June 30, 
   2022   2021 
Net cash provided by (used in):          
Operating activities  $(27,411)  $(77,883)
Investing activities   -    - 
Financing activities   -    - 
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents  $(27,411)  $(77,883)

 

Operating Activities

 

Operating activities consisted primarily of net income/(loss) adjusted for certain non-cash items. In addition, operating cash flows included the effect of changes in operating assets and liabilities.

 

The cash used in the reporting period decreased by US$50,472 from US$77,883 for the first half of 2021 to US$27,411 for the same period of 2022. The decrease in cash used from operating activities was mainly due to the decrease of net loss of US$46,972 and the increase of net cash flows from operating assets and liabilities of US$3,500.

 

Investing Activities

 

There was no investing activity in the reporting period.

 

Financing Activities

 

There was no financing activity in the reporting period.

 

Significant Accounting Policies

 

Use of Estimates and Assumptions

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

13

 

 

Due to the limited level of operations, the Company has not made material assumptions or estimates other than the assumption that the Company is a going concern.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less when purchased to be cash equivalents.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

ASC 825, “Disclosures about Fair Value of Financial Instruments”, requires disclosure of fair value information about financial instruments. ASC 820, “Fair Value Measurements” defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value in generally accepted accounting principles, and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. Fair value estimates discussed herein are based upon certain market assumptions and pertinent information available to management as of December 31, 2018.

 

The respective carrying values of certain on-balance-sheet financial instruments approximate their fair values. These financial instruments include cash, accrued liabilities and notes payable. Fair values were assumed to approximate carrying values for these financial instruments since they are short term in nature and their carrying amounts approximate fair value.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company will recognize revenue in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification No. 606, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers” (“ASC-606”). ASC-606 requires that the criteria must be met before revenue can be recognized:

 

1. The parties to the contract have approved the contract (in writing, orally, or in accordance with other customary business practices) and are committed to perform their respective obligations.
2. The Company can identify each party’s rights regarding the goods or services to be transferred.
3. The Company can identify the payment terms for the goods or services to be transferred.
4. The contract has commercial substance (that is, the risk, timing, or amount of the entity’s future cash flows is expected to change as a result of the contract).
5. It is probable that the Company will collect substantially all of the consideration to which it will be entitled in exchange for the goods or services that will be transferred to the customer. In evaluating whether collectability of an amount of consideration is probable, an entity shall consider only the customer’s ability and intention to pay that amount of consideration when it is due. The amount of consideration to which the entity will be entitled may be less than the price stated in the contract if the consideration is variable because the entity may offer the customer a price concession.

 

Basic and Diluted Net Loss Per Share

 

Our computation of earnings per share (“EPS”) includes basic and diluted EPS. Basic EPS is measured as the income (loss) available to common stockholders divided by the weighted average common shares outstanding for the period. Diluted income (loss) per share reflects the potential dilution, using the treasury stock method, that could occur if securities or other contracts to issue common stock were exercised or converted into common stock or resulted in the issuance of common stock that then shared in the income (loss) of the Company as if they had been converted at the beginning of the periods presented, or issuance date, if later. In computing diluted income (loss) per share, the treasury stock method assumes that outstanding options and warrants are exercised and the proceeds are used to purchase common stock at the average market price during the period. Options and warrants may have a dilutive effect under the treasury stock method only when the average market price of the common stock during the period exceeds the exercise price of the options and warrants. Potential common shares that have an anti-dilutive effect (i.e., those that increase income per share or decrease loss per share) are excluded from the calculation of diluted EPS.

 

Income (loss) per common share is computed by dividing net income (loss) by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the respective periods. Basic and diluted (loss) per common share is the same for periods in which the company reported an operating loss because all warrants and stock options outstanding are anti-dilutive. There were no adjustments to net loss required for purposes of computing diluted earnings per share.

 

14

 

 

Comprehensive income (loss)

 

The Company follows the provisions of the Financial Accounting Standards Board (the “FASB”) ASC 220 Reporting Comprehensive Income and establishes standards for the reporting and display of comprehensive income, its components and accumulated balances in a full set of general purpose financial statements. The Company’s comprehensive loss consists of net loss and foreign currency translation adjustments.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

 

In February 2018, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update No. 2018-02 Reclassification of Certain Tax Effects from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (ASU 2018-02). The standard provides financial statement preparers with an option to reclassify stranded tax effects within Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (AOCI) to retained earnings in each period in which the effect of the change in the U.S. federal corporate income tax rate in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (or portion thereof) is recorded. ASU 2018-02 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted.

 

In December 2018, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update No. 2018-05, Income Taxes (Topic 740), Amendments to SEC Paragraphs Pursuant to SEC Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 118 (ASU 2018-05). The ASU adds various Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) paragraphs pursuant to the issuance of the December 2017 SEC Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 118, Income Tax Accounting Implications of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“SAB 118”), which was effective immediately. The SEC issued SAB 118 to address concerns about reporting entities’ ability to timely comply with the accounting requirements to recognize all of the effects of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act in the period of enactment. SAB 118 allows disclosure that timely determination of some or all of the income tax effects from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act are incomplete by the due date of the financial statements and if possible to provide a reasonable estimate.

 

As of June 30, 2022, except for the above, there are no recently issued accounting standards not yet adopted that would have a material effect on the Company’s financial statements.

 

ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

Not applicable.

 

15

 

 

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

In accordance with Rule 13a-15(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 as amended (the “Exchange Act”), as of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, the Company’s management evaluated, with the participation of the Company’s principal executive and financial officer, the effectiveness of the design and operation of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) or Rule 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act). Disclosure controls and procedures are defined as those controls and other procedures of an issuer that are designed to ensure that the information required to be disclosed by the issuer in the reports it files or submits under the Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the Commission’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by an issuer in the reports that it files or submits under the Act is accumulated and communicated to the issuer’s management, including its principal executive and principal financial officers, or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Based on that evaluation, we concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures are ineffective in gathering, analyzing and disclosing information needed to satisfy the registrant’s disclosure obligations under the Exchange Act. Based upon an evaluation of the effectiveness of disclosure controls and procedures, our Company’s principal executive and principal financial officer has concluded that as of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) or 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act) are not effective because of the material weaknesses in our disclosure controls and procedures. which is identified below. It should be noted that the design of any system of controls is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions, regardless of how remote.

 

The material weaknesses in our disclosure control procedures are as follows:

 

The Company utilizes a third-party independent contractor for the work required for preparation of its US GAAP consolidated financial statements. There are certain challenges faced in providing sufficient resources in terms of time and access to allow the contractor to properly record all of the adjustments necessary on a timely basis to conform our reporting to US GAAP standards.

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting for the Company (as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act). Internal control over financial reporting is to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of our financial reporting for external purposes in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. Internal control over financial reporting includes maintaining records that in reasonable detail accurately and fairly reflect our transactions; providing reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary for preparation of our financial statements; providing reasonable assurance that receipts and expenditures of company assets are made in accordance with management authorization; and providing reasonable assurance that unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of company assets that could have a material effect on our financial statements would be prevented or detected.

 

As of June 30, 2022, management assessed the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on the criteria for effective internal control over financial reporting established in SEC guidance on conducting such assessments. Based on this evaluation under the COSO Framework, our management concluded that our internal controls over financial reporting are not effective as of June 30, 2022. In making this assessment, our management used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (“COSO”) in Internal Control-Integrated Framework. Based on that evaluation, they concluded that, as of June 30, 2022, such internal controls and procedures were not effective to detect the inappropriate application of US GAAP rules as more fully described below. This was due to deficiencies that existed in the design or operation of our internal control over financial reporting that adversely affected our internal controls and that may be considered to be material weaknesses.

 

16

 

 

The matters involving internal controls and procedures that the Company’s management considered to be material weaknesses under the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board were: (1) lack of a functioning audit committee and lack of a majority of outside directors on the Company’s board of directors, resulting in ineffective oversight in the establishment and monitoring of required internal controls and procedures; (2) inadequate segregation of duties consistent with control objectives; (3) insufficient written policies and procedures for accounting and financial reporting with respect to the requirements and application of US GAAP and SEC disclosure requirements; and (4) ineffective controls over period end financial disclosure and reporting processes. The aforementioned material weaknesses were identified by the Company’s Chief Financial Officer in connection with the review of our financial statements as of June 30, 2022 and communicated to our management.

 

Management believes that the material weaknesses set forth in items (2), (3) and (4) above did not have an effect on the Company’s financial results. However, management believes that the lack of a functioning audit committee and lack of a majority of outside directors on the Company’s board of directors, resulting in ineffective oversight in the establishment and monitoring of required internal controls and procedures can result in the Company’s determination to its financial statements for the future years.

 

We are committed to improving our financial organization. As part of this commitment, we will create a position to segregate duties consistent with control objectives and will increase our personnel resources and technical accounting expertise within the accounting function when funds are available to the Company: (i) Appointing one or more outside directors to our board of directors who shall be appointed to the audit committee of the Company resulting in a fully functioning audit committee who will undertake the oversight in the establishment and monitoring of required internal controls and procedures; and (ii) preparing and implementing sufficient written policies and checklists which will set forth procedures for accounting and financial reporting with respect to the requirements and application of US GAAP and SEC disclosure requirements.

 

Management believes that the appointment of more outside directors, who shall be appointed to a fully functioning audit committee, will remedy the lack of a functioning audit committee and a lack of a majority of outside directors on the Company’s Board. In addition, management believes that preparing and implementing sufficient written policies and checklists will remedy the following material weaknesses (i) insufficient written policies and procedures for accounting and financial reporting with respect to the requirements and application of US GAAP and SEC disclosure requirements; and (ii) ineffective controls over period end financial close and reporting processes. Further, management believes that the hiring of additional personnel who have the technical expertise and knowledge will result proper segregation of duties and provide more checks and balances within the department. Additional personnel will also provide the cross training needed to support the Company if personnel turn over issues within the department occur. This coupled with the appointment of additional outside directors will greatly decrease any control and procedure issues the Company may encounter in the future.

 

We will continue to monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of our internal controls and procedures and our internal controls over financial reporting on an ongoing basis and are committed to taking further action and implementing additional enhancements or improvements, as necessary and as funds allow.

 

There have been no changes in our internal controls over financial reporting that occurred during the quarter ended June 30, 2022, that have materially affected or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal controls over financial reporting.

 

This quarterly report does not include an attestation report of the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management’s report was not subject to attestation by the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm pursuant to temporary rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission that permit the Company to provide management report in the quarterly report.

 

17

 

 

PART II – OTHER INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

We are not currently a party to any legal proceedings.

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

We are a smaller reporting company as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act and are not required to provide the information required under this item.

 

ITEM 2. UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS

 

The following sales of equity securities by the Company occurred during the three-month period ended June 30, 2022: None.

 

ITEM 3. DEFAULTS UPON SENIOR SECURITIES

 

None.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

Mine safety disclosures are not applicable.

 

ITEM 5. OTHER INFORMATION

 

None.

 

ITEM 6. EXHIBITS

 

Exhibits:

 

31.1   Rule 13(a)-14(a)/15(d)-14(a) Certification of Chief Executive Officer
31.2   Rule 13(a)-14(a)/15(d)-14(a) Certification of Chief Financial Officer
32.1   Section 1350 Certification by Chief Executive Officer
32.2   Section 1350 Certification by Chief Financial Officer
101.INS   Inline XBRL Instance Document
101.SCH   Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
101.CAL   Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
101.DEF   Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
101.LAB   Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
101.PRE   Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document
104   Cover Page Interactive Data File (embedded within the Inline XBRL document)

 

18

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

      GJ Culture Group US, Inc., a Nevada corporation
         
DATED: August 15, 2022   By: /s/ Sanjun Kuang
        Sanjun Kuang
       

Chief Executive Officer

Chief Financial Officer

 

19

 

 

EXHIBIT 31.1

 

CERTIFICATION

 

I, Sanjun Kuang, certify that:

 

1. I have reviewed this quarterly report on Form 10-Q of GJ Culture Group US, Inc.;
   
2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;
   
3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;
   
4. The registrant’s other certifying officer and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f)) for the registrant and have:

 

  (a) designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;
     
  (b) designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;
     
  (c) evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and
     
  (d) disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and

 

5. The registrant’s other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on my most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):

 

  (a) all significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and
     
  (b) any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

Date: August 15, 2022   By: /s/ Sanjun Kuang
        Sanjun Kuang
       

Chief Executive Officer

(Principal Executive Officer)

 

 

 

 

EXHIBIT 31.2

 

CERTIFICATION

 

I, Sanjun Kuang, certify that:

 

1. I have reviewed this quarterly report on Form 10-Q of GJ Culture Group US, Inc.;
   
2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;
   
3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;
   
4. The registrant’s other certifying officer and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f)) for the registrant and have:

 

  (a) designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;
     
  (b) designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;
     
  (c) evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and
     
  (d) disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and

 

5. The registrant’s other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on my most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):

 

  (a) all significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and
     
  (b) any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

Date: August 15, 2022   By: /s/ Sanjun Kuang
        Sanjun Kuang
       

Chief Financial Officer

(Principal Financial Officer)

 

 

 

 

EXHIBIT 32.1

 

CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO

18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350, AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO

SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

 

In connection with the quarterly report on Form 10-Q of GJ Culture Group US, Inc. (the “Company”) for the period ended June 30, 2022, as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on the date hereof (the “Report”), I hereby certify, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, that, to the best of my knowledge and belief:

 

  (1) The Report fully complies with the requirements of Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; and
     
  (2) The information contained in this Report fairly presents, in all material respects, the financial condition and result of operations of the Company.

 

Date: August 15, 2022   By: /s/ Sanjun Kuang
        Sanjun Kuang
       

Chief Executive Officer

(Principal Executive Officer)

 

 

 

 

EXHIBIT 32.2

 

CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO

18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350, AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO

SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

 

In connection with the quarterly report on Form 10-Q of GJ Culture Group US, Inc. (the “Company”) for the period ended June 30, 2022, as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on the date hereof (the “Report”), I hereby certify, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, that, to the best of my knowledge and belief:

 

  (1) The Report fully complies with the requirements of Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; and
     
  (2) The information contained in this Report fairly presents, in all material respects, the financial condition and result of operations of the Company.

 

Date: August 15, 2022   By: /s/ Sanjun Kuang
        Sanjun Kuang
       

Chief Financial Officer

(Principal Financial Officer)

 

 

 



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