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Form 10-K/A JJY Holding Group For: Dec 31

August 9, 2022 10:41 AM EDT

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Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K/A

(Amendment No. 1)

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the year ended December 31, 2021

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from ___________ to _____________

 

Commission file number: 000-53212

 

JJY Holding Group
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Nevada   92-0189305
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

528 Pudong Road

16th Floor

Shanghai 200120

China

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

 

+86-21-50917695

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Beesfree, Inc.

(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act:

 

Title of each class   Trading Symbol(s)   Name of each exchange on which registered
None   N/A   N/A

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes No

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer Accelerated filer
Non-accelerated filer Smaller reporting company
    Emerging growth company

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes ☐    No ☒

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has fi led a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the eff ectiveness of its internal control over fi nancial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting fi rm that prepared or issued its audit report. ☐

 

State the aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was last sold, or the average bid and asked price of such common equity, as of the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter. $0

 

As of December 31, 2021, the Company has 46,344,728 shares of common stock issued and outstanding

 

 

   

 

 

JJY HOLDING GROUP

ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

    Page
CAUTIONARY NOTE ABOUT FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS  
   
PART I    
Item 1. Description of Business 1
Item 1A. Risk Factors 5
     
PART IV    
Item 15. Exhibits; Financial Statement Schedules 21
   
SIGNATURES 22

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 i 

 

 

EXPLANATORY NOTE

 

JJY Holding Group. (the “Company” or “we”) filed its Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021 (the “Original Annual Report”) with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) on April 11, 2022. The Company is filing this Amendment No. 1 (the “Amendment”) to the Original Annual Report for the purpose of (i) providing certain disclosures regarding potential legal and operational risks associated with being based in China if we consummate a combination transaction with an operating company with significant businesses in China at the onset of “Part 1” in response to the SEC’s comments set forth in its letter dated July 26, 2022.

 

In addition, pursuant to Rule 12b-15 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, the Amendment also contains new certifications by the principal executive officer and the principal financial officer as required by Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

This Amendment does not modify, amend or update in any way the financial statements and other disclosures set forth in the Original Annual Report, and there have been no changes to the XBRL data filed in Exhibit 101 of the Original Annual Report. In addition, except as specifically described above, this Amendment does not reflect events occurring after the filing of the Original Annual Report, nor does it modify or update disclosures therein in any way other than as required to reflect the revisions described above. Among other things, forward-looking statements made in the Original Annual Report have not been revised to reflect events that occurred or facts that became known to us after the filing of the Original Annual Report, and any such forward looking statements should be read in their historical context. Accordingly, this Amendment should be read in conjunction with the Original Annual Report.

 

Use of Certain Defined Terms

 

Except as otherwise indicated by the context, references in this report to “JJY Holding Group”, “we,” “us,” “our,” “our Company”.

 

Forward-Looking Statements

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Act, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). Forward-looking statements discuss matters that are not historical facts. Because they discuss future events or conditions, forward-looking statements may include words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “intend,” “could,” “should,” “would,” “may,” “seek,” “plan,” “might,” “will,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “predict,” “project,” “forecast,” “potential,” “continue” negatives thereof or similar expressions. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they are made, are based on various underlying assumptions and current expectations about the future and are not guarantees. Such statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, level of activity, performance or achievement to be materially different from the results of operations or plans expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements.

 

We cannot predict all of the risks and uncertainties. Accordingly, such information should not be regarded as representations that the results or conditions described in such statements or that our objectives and plans will be achieved and we do not assume any responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of any of these forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are found at various places throughout this Annual Report on Form 10-K and include information concerning possible or assumed future results of our operations, including statements about potential acquisition or merger targets; business strategies; future cash flows; financing plans; plans and objectives of management; any other statements regarding future acquisitions, future cash needs, future operations, business plans and future financial results, and any other statements that are not historical facts.

 

These forward-looking statements represent our intentions, plans, expectations, assumptions and beliefs about future events and are subject to risks, uncertainties and other factors. Many of those factors are outside of our control and could cause actual results to differ materially from the results expressed or implied by those forward-looking statements. In light of these risks, uncertainties and assumptions, the events described in the forward-looking statements might not occur or might occur to a different extent or at a different time than we have described. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of the Annual Report on Form 10-K. All subsequent written and oral forward-looking statements concerning other matters addressed in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and attributable to us or any person acting on our behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by the cautionary statements contained or referred to in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Except to the extent required by law, we undertake no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events, a change in events, conditions, circumstances or assumptions underlying such statements, or otherwise.

 

 ii 

 

 

 

PART I

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

 

Business Overview

 

(a)Business Development

 

JJY Holding Group formerly Beesfree, Inc. (the “Company”) was originally incorporated in the State of Nevada on September 4, 2007 as BNH, Inc. On October 4, 2011, the Company filed Articles of Merger with the Nevada Secretary of State. BNH, Inc merged with JJY Holding Group and the surviving entity name was The Company was a development stage company that planned to develop a proprietary composite food supplement for honeybees, BeesVita PlusTM which believed to prevent the effects of colony collapse disorder (“CCD”). CCD is a phenomenon in which worker bees from a beehive or colony abruptly disappear effectively killing the colony. The Company’s goal was to initially sell products directly to large beekeepers in the United States, Europe and Argentina.

Business operations for JJY Holding Group and its subsidiaries were abandoned by former management and a custodianship action, as described in the subsequent paragraph, was commenced in 2016. The Company filed its last 10-K in 2013, this financial report included liabilities and debts.

 

On June 16, 2016, the Eighth District Court of Clark County, Nevada granted the Application for Appointment of Custodian as a result of the absence of a functioning board of directors and the revocation of the Company’s charter. The order appointed Bryan Glass (“Mr. Glass”, the “Custodian”) custodian with the right to appoint officers and directors, negotiate and compromise debt, execute contracts, issue stock, and authorize new classes of stock.

 

The court awarded custodianship to Mr. Glass based on the absence of a functioning board of directors, revocation of the Company’s charter, and abandonment of the business. At this time, Mr. Glass was appointed sole officer and director.

 

The Company was severely delinquent in filing annual reports for the Company’s charter. The last annual report was filed on December 31, 2013 in on Form 10-K. In addition, the Company was subject to Exchange Act reporting requirements including filing 10Q’s and 10Ks. The Company filed its last 10Q for quarter ending September 30, 2013 and was out of compliance with Exchange Act reporting. Mr. Glass attempted to contact the Company’s officers and directors through letters, emails, and phone calls, with no success.

 

Mr. Glass was a shareholder in the Company and applied to the Court for an Order appointing Brian Glass as the Custodian. This application was for the purpose of reinstating the Company’s corporate charter to do business and restoring value to the Company for the benefit of the stockholders.

 

Mr. Glass performed the following actions in its capacity as custodian:

Funded any expenses of the Company including paying off outstanding liabilities
Brought the Company back into compliance with the Nevada Secretary of State, resident agent, transfer agent
Appointed officers and directors and held a shareholders meeting

 

The Custodian paid the following expenses on behalf of the Company:

Nevada Secretary of State for reinstatement of the Company, $4,311
Transfer agent, VStock Transfer LLC, $3,045
Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation for the Company, $175

 

 

 1 

 

 

Upon appointment as the Custodian of the Company and under its duties stipulated by the Nevada court, Mr. Glass took initiative to organize the business of the issuer. As Custodian, the duties were to conduct daily business, hold shareholder meetings, appoint officers and directors, reinstate the Company with the Nevada Secretary of State. Mr. Glass also had authority to enter into contracts and find a suitable merger candidate. Mr. Glass was compensated for its role as custodian in the amount of 30,000,000 shares of Restricted Common Stock. Mr. Glass did not receive any additional compensation, in the form of cash or stock, for custodian services. The custodianship was discharged on January 19, 2017.

 

On April 2, 2018, Mr. Glass entered into a Stock Purchase Agreement with Yan Ping Sheng, whereby Mr. Sheng purchased 30,000,000 shares of Restricted Common Stock. These shares represent the controlling block of stock. Mr. Glass resigned his position of sole officer and director and appointed Yan Ping Sheng as CEO, Treasurer, Secretary, and Director of the Company.

 

We are currently a shell company, as defined in Rule 405 under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), and Rule 12b-2. 

 

(b)Business of Issuer

 

JJY Holding Group is a developmental stage company, incorporated under the laws of the State of Nevada on September 4, 2007. Our plan of business has not been implemented but will incorporate trading agricultural products, food processing, and be a supply chain for supermarkets.

 

On September 29, 2020, Company changed its name in Nevada, the state of domicile, to JJY Holding Group.

 

At this time, the Company also cancelled its Convertible Series A Cumulative Stock and its Convertible Series B Cumulative Stock. There were no shares issued and outstanding.

 

At present financial revenue has not yet been realized. The Company hopes to raise capital in order to fund the acquisitions.

 

All statements involving our business plan are forward looking statements and have not been implemented as of this filing.

 

The Company is moving in a new direction, statements made relating to our business plan are forward looking statements and we have no history of performance. Current management does not have any experience in trading agricultural products, food processing, and supply chain management for supermarkets.

 

We feel that our business plan addresses the need for additional food chain supply on an international level.

 

Our business plan is to engage in a merger or acquisition with a company whose business is in trading agricultural products, food processing, and supply chain management for supermarkets.

 

The impact due to Covid-19 has accelerated already robust need for trading agricultural products, food processing, or supply chain management for supermarkets. COVID-19 has created a shortage of labor in some parts of China where it was winter harvest season during the crisis.

 

Disruption of the food distribution systems has caused considerable problems in sales of agricultural products, although demand is not met in the city during the COVID-19 period. To mitigate the adverse effects of the situation, measures have been taken to match production with sales to help both farmers and consumers. Specifically, the production is mainly connected to three types of buyers: (1) wholesale markets and distributors; (2) supermarkets and shops; (3) communities and neighborhood committees. Our business plan will help mitigate the shortage in the following ways:

 

Agricultural Products is generally taken to include

 

  · Rice, wheat, potatoes, tomatoes, cotton, oilseed, corn, soybeans, barley, tea, millet, peanuts

 

 

 

 2 

 

 

The Company intends to implement its business plan upon raising capital. Subject to available capital, the Company intends to invest in:

 

Development

 

  · Identify areas of shortage in the agricultural trade industry
  · Build a digital platform to support our business plan and manage the food supply chain
  · Assemble a management team to implement our business plan
  · Hire a marketing and sales team
  · Develop a business model that is compliant with governmental regulations

 

Implementation

 

  · Contract with farmers and food processing plants
  · Contract with supermarkets for delivery of our products to consumers

 

The analysis will be undertaken by or under the supervision of our management. As of the date of this filing, we have not entered into definitive agreements. In our continued efforts to analyze potential business plan, we intend to consider the following factors:

 

  · Potential for growth, indicated by anticipated market expansion or new technology;
  · Competitive position of our trading agricultural products, food processing, or supply chain management for supermarkets to our competitors of similar size and experience within the agricultural and processing segment as well as within the industry as a whole;
  · Strength and diversity of management, and the accessibility of required management expertise, personnel, services, professional assistance and other required items;
  · Capital requirements and anticipated availability of required funds, to be provided by the Company or from operations, through the sale of additional securities or convertible debt, through joint ventures or similar arrangements or from other sources;
  · The extent to which the business opportunity can be advanced in the marketplace; and
  · Other relevant factors

 

In applying the foregoing criteria, management will attempt to analyze all factors and circumstances and make a determination based upon reasonable investigative measures and available data. Due to our limited capital available for investigation, we may not discover or adequately evaluate adverse facts about the opportunity to be acquired. Additionally, we will be competing against other entities that may have greater financial, technical, and managerial capabilities for identifying and completing our business plan.

 

We are unable to predict when we will, if ever, identify and implement our business plan. We anticipate that proposed business plan would be made available to us through personal contacts of our directors, officers and principal stockholders, professional advisors, broker-dealers, venture capitalists, members of the financial community and others who may present unsolicited proposals. In certain cases, we may agree to pay a finder’s fee or to otherwise compensate the persons who introduce the Company to business opportunities in which we participate.

 

As of the time of this filing, the Company has not implemented its business plan.

 

We expect that our due diligence will encompass, among other things, meetings with incumbent management of the target business and inspection of its facilities, as necessary, as well as a review of financial and other information, which is made available to the Company. This due diligence review will be conducted either by our management or by third parties we may engage. We anticipate that we may rely on the issuance of our common stock in lieu of cash payments for services or expenses related to any analysis.

 

 

 3 

 

 

We may incur time and costs required to select and evaluate our business structure and complete our business plan, which cannot presently be determined with any degree of certainty. Any costs incurred with respect to the indemnification and evaluation of a prospective international education program that is not ultimately completed may result in a loss to the Company. These fees may include legal costs, accounting costs, finder’s fees, consultant’s fees and other related expenses. We have no present arrangements for any of these types of fees.

 

We anticipate that the investigation of specific business opportunities and the negotiation, drafting and execution of relevant agreements, disclosure documents and other instruments will require substantial management time and attention and substantial cost for accountants, attorneys, consultants, and others. Costs may be incurred in the investigation process, which may not be recoverable. Furthermore, even if an agreement is reached for the participation in a specific business opportunity, the failure to consummate that transaction may result in a loss to the Company of the related costs incurred.

 

Competition

 

Our company expects to compete with many countries in the agricultural, food processing and supermarket supply chain management industry. In addition, there are several competitors that are larger and more profitable than the Company. We expect that the quantity and composition of our competitive environment will continue to evolve as the industry changes and grows. Additionally, increased competition is possible to the extent that new geographies enter the marketplace as a result of continued enactment of regulatory and legislative changes. We believe that diligently establishing and expanding our funding sources will establish us in an already established industry. Additionally, we expect that establishing our product offerings and supply chain management are factors that mitigate the risk associated with operating in a developing competitive environment. Additionally, the change of the industry as a whole due to COVID-19 regulation will result in our food processing and supply chain management to supermarkets being more efficient due our control of the process from growing to delivery to supermarkets, thereby further mitigating the impact of competition on our future operations and results.

 

Compliance with agricultural and food processing guidelines will increase development costs and the cost of operating our business. In turn, we may not be able to meet the competitive price point for our end product dictated by the market and our competitors.

 

Again, these are forward looking statements and not an indication of past performance. There is no guarantee that we will be able to implement our business plan and have no merger candidates as of the time of this filing.

 

Effect of Existing or Probable Governmental Regulations on the Business

 

Upon effectiveness of this Form 10, we will be subject to the Exchange Act and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Under the Exchange Act, we will be required to file with the SEC annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q and current reports on Form 8-K. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act creates a strong and independent accounting oversight board to oversee the conduct of auditors of public companies and to strengthen auditor independence. It also (1) requires steps be taken to enhance the direct responsibility of senior members of management for financial reporting and for the quality of financial disclosures made by public companies; (2) establishes clear statutory rules to limit, and to expose to public view, possible conflicts of interest affecting securities analysts; (3) creates guidelines for audit committee members’ appointment, and compensation and oversight of the work of public companies’ auditors; (4) prohibits certain insider trading during pension fund blackout periods; and (5) establishes a federal crime of securities fraud, among other provisions.

 

We will also be subject to Section 14(a) of the Exchange Act, which requires all companies with securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act to comply with the rules and regulations of the SEC regarding proxy solicitations, as outlined in Regulation 14A. Matters submitted to our stockholders at a special or annual meeting thereof or pursuant to a written consent will require us to provide our stockholders with the information outlined in Schedules 14A or 14C of Regulation 14A. Preliminary copies of this information must be submitted to the SEC at least 10 days prior to the date that definitive copies of this information are provided to our stockholders.

 

 

 4 

 

 

Employees

 

As of December 31, 2021, we had one officer, three directors and no employees. We anticipate that we will begin to fill out our management team as and when we raise capital to begin implementing our business plan. In the interim, we will utilize independent consultants to assist with accounting and administrative matters. We currently have no employment agreements and believe our consulting relationships are satisfactory. We plan to continue to hire independent consultants from time to time on an as-needed basis.

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

Risks Relating to Our Business

 

Our business plan involves a number of very significant risks. Our future business, operating results and financial condition could be seriously harmed as a result of the occurrence of any of the following risks. You could lose all or part of your investment due to any of these risks. You should invest in our common stock only if you can afford to lose your entire investment.

 

Our business plan is to engage in a merger or acquisition with a company whose business is in trading agricultural products, food processing, and supply chain management for supermarkets.

 

The Company and the majority of our executive officers and directors, being located in China, may make JJY Holding Group a less attractive partner to target companies than a non-PRC company. Therefore, it may make it more likely for the Company to consummate a business combination in the PRC. 

 

Our executive officers and directors are located in and has significant ties to China, and we may seek to acquire a company that may be based in China or Hong Kong in an initial business combination.

 

We are a Nevada company and may conduct operations by subsidiaries and/or through contractual arrangements with a variable interest entity (VIE) based in China and that the structure involves unique risks to investors.

 

There are greater legal and operational risks associated having the majority of our contemplated operations in China.

 

China may be subject to considerable degrees of economic, political and social instability. Investments in securities of Chinese issuers involve risks that are specific to China, including regulatory, liquidity and enforcement risks. These risks could result in a material change in our operations and/or the value of our securities and cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or be worthless.

 

Regulatory cycles are not uncommon in China. Policy and regulatory scrutiny should be seen as ongoing risks when it comes to investing in China. The revised Chinese regulations have not ruled on for our industry. We are not currently engaged in a VIE structure, however that could change moving forward.

 

Legal claims, including federal securities law claims, against China-based Issuers, or their officers, directors, and gatekeepers, may be difficult or impossible for investors to pursue in U.S. courts. Even if an investor obtains a judgment in a U.S. court, the investor may be unable to enforce such judgment, particularly in the case of a China-based Issuer, where the related assets or persons are typically located outside of the United States and in jurisdictions that may not recognize or enforce U.S. judgments. If an investor is unable to bring a U.S. claim or collect on a U.S. judgment, the investor may have to rely on legal claims and remedies available in China or other overseas jurisdictions where the China-based Issuer may maintain assets. The claims and remedies available in these jurisdictions are often significantly different from those available in the United States and difficult to pursue.

 

 

 

 5 

 

 

We are subject to differing and sometimes conflicting laws and regulations in the various China jurisdictions where we provide our services. New laws and regulations may be adopted from time to time to address new issues that come to the authorities' attention. In addition, considerable uncertainties still exist with respect to the interpretation and implementation of existing laws and regulations governing our contemplated business activities. A large number of proposals are before various national, regional, and local legislative bodies and regulatory entities regarding issues related to our industry or our business model. As we implement our business plan and expand into new cities or countries or as we add new products and services to our platform, we may become subject to additional laws and regulations that we are not subject to now. Existing or new laws and regulations could expose us to substantial liability, including significant expenses necessary to comply with such laws and regulations, and could dampen our growth, which could adversely affect our business and results of operations. See Risk Factors 1A. Risks related to China’s evolving regulatory environment.

 

The Chinese government may intervene or influence our operations at any time or may exert more control over offerings conducted overseas and/or foreign investment in China-based issuers. This elevated oversight could result in a material change in our operations and/or the value of our common stock.

 

Actions by the Chinese government to exert more oversight and control over offerings that are conducted overseas and/or foreign investment in China-based issuers could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors and cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or be worthless.

 

Recent statements and regulatory actions by the Chinese government have addressed the issue of anti-monopoly concerns. When a business operator’s abuse of intellectual property rights to exclude or restrict competition constitutes a monopoly agreement, the anti-monopoly law enforcement agency shall order it to stop the illegal activity, confiscate the illegal income, and impose fines. Upon execution of our business plan, the Company will be subject to anti-monopoly laws and, if found in violation, our stock price could decline or become worthless.

 

It will be difficult for investors to assert claims against China-based issuers, including their officers, directors, and agents and it may be challenging for investors to pursue their claims in U.S. courts. Even if an investor secures a judgment, the investor may still be unable to enforce it in China.

 

In addition, the assertion of new regulation by the Chinese government could hinder our ability to continue to offer our stock to foreign investors and our ability to execute of our business plan.

 

The Company is currently organized under the operating structure of the public entity, JJY Holding Group (formerly Beesfree, Inc.), incorporated in the state of Nevada. The Company plans to conduct operations in China and may acquire Chinese companies as subsidiaries to carry out its plan of operation.

 

China’s legal system is substantially different from the legal system in the United States and may raise risks and uncertainties concerning the intent, effect, and enforcement of its laws, rules, and regulations, including those that restrict the inflow and outflow of foreign capital or provide the Chinese government with significant authority to exert influence on a China-based Issuer’s ability to conduct business or raise capital. This lack of certainty may result in the inconsistent and unpredictable interpretation and enforcement of laws, rules, and regulations, which may change quickly. China-based Issuers face risks related to evolving laws and regulations, which could impede their ability to obtain or maintain permits or licenses required to conduct business in China. In the absence of required permits or licenses, governmental authorities may impose material sanctions or penalties on the company. Such actions could significantly limit or completely hinder your ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors and cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or be worthless. See Risk Factors 1A. Our business is subject to numerous legal and regulatory risks that could have an adverse impact on our contemplated business.

 

The Company is not currently organized under a Variable Interest Entity (“VIE”), however, we may decide to implement a VIE structure in the future. The disclosed risks or events are only applicable if we decide to implement a VIE structure.

 

 

 

 6 

 

 

We are a Nevada company and may conduct operations by subsidiaries and/or through contractual arrangements with a variable interest entity (VIE) based in China and that the structure involves unique risks to investors.

 

China’s Foreign Investment Law (“FIL”) may prohibit direct foreign investment in Chinese operating companies moving forward and many Chinese companies are using Variable Interest Entities to circumvent this ruling.

 

VIEs are structured as a Cayman Islands holding company with operations conducted by the company’s subsidiaries and through contractual arrangements with a Variable Interest Entity (VIE) based in China and this structure involves unique risks to investors. These contracts have not been tested in court. 

 

The VIE structure is used to provide investors with exposure to foreign investment in China-based companies where Chinese law prohibits direct foreign investment in the operating companies, and investors may never hold equity interests in the Chinese operating company.

 

Chinese regulatory authorities could disallow this structure, which would likely result in a material change in our contemplated operations and/or a material change in the value of our securities. These regulations could cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or become worthless. 

 

If we decide to implement a VIE structure, it will consist of at least three core entities: a Chinese company with legitimate operations; a wholly foreign-owned enterprise established as an intermediary in China; and an offshore shell company that lists on a U.S. or other foreign exchange. The structure is such that subsidiaries and/or the VIE conduct operations in China, and the VIE is consolidated for accounting purposes but is not an entity in which the investor owns equity, and the holding company does not conduct operations.

 

These contracts have not been tested in court and courts are unlikely to enforce the VIE contracts. Because the value of the offshore shell company derives from its ability to consolidate the Chinese VIE on its financial statements, losing the VIE as a result of breached contracts (or government enforcement) would significantly devalue shareholders’ investments.

 

The Chinese government could rule that the VIE structure is against public policy, Chinese laws, and regulations. This ruling would likely result in a material change in our contemplated operations if we were to implement a VIE. Furthermore, the disruption or termination of our contemplated operations could result in the decline in the value of our stock may become worthless, and the shareholder could lose their entire investment.

 

Any failure by a VIE or its shareholders to perform their obligations under our contractual arrangements with them would have a material and adverse effect on its business. If a VIE or their shareholders fail to perform their respective obligations under the contractual arrangements, a company would incur substantial costs and expend additional resources to enforce such arrangements. A company would rely on legal remedies under PRC law, including seeking specific performance or injunctive relief, and contractual remedies, which we cannot assure you will be sufficient or effective under PRC law.

 

In addition, if any third parties claim any interest in such shareholders' equity interests in a VIE, the ability to exercise shareholders' rights or foreclose the share pledge according to the contractual arrangements may be impaired. If these or other disputes between the shareholders of a VIE and third parties were to impair our control over the VIE, the company’s ability to consolidate the financial results of the VIE would be affected, which would in turn result in a material adverse effect on business, operations and financial condition of the company.

 

The Company does not currently have operations or use a VIE structure, but that if we do implement this structure, there would be substantial legal uncertainties surrounding the related contractual arrangements. Chinese regulatory authorities could disallow this structure, which would likely result in a material change in the company’s operations and/or a material change in the value of the securities that may be registered for sale and may cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or become worthless.

 

 

 

 7 

 

 

We will continue to monitor the changes in FIL, and the Company may consider migrating to a VIE structure to continue receiving participation from foreign investors.

 

In addition, recent statements and regulatory actions by the Chinese government have addressed the issue of anti-monopoly concerns. Where a business operator’s abuse of intellectual property rights to exclude or restrict competition constitutes a monopoly agreement, the anti-monopoly law enforcement agency shall order it to stop the illegal activity, confiscate the illegal income, and impose fines. Upon execution of our business plan, the Company will be subject to anti-monopoly laws and, if found in violation, our stock price could decline or become worthless.

 

Our contemplated operations are governed by the China Securities Regulatory Commission (“CSRC”), Cyber Administration of China (“CAC”), and China Food and Drug Administration (“CFDA”)

 

CAC oversees data security and recently revised its laws to include operators that possess personal information for over one million individuals would be subject to cybersecurity review when listing of foreign exchanges. Personal information is defined in Article 76(5) of Cybersecurity Law as various information which is recorded in electronic or any other form and used alone or in combination with other information to recognize the identity of a natural person, including but not limited to name, date of birth, ID number, personal biological identification information, address and telephone number of natural persons.

 

As we have not implemented our business plan, the Company does not meet the criteria to trigger the CAC revised rule. However, we anticipate that, upon executing our business model, we will be subject to CAC rules and regulations. Our operations could be suspended if the CAC finds we are in violation of data security laws.

 

The CRSC oversees China's nationwide centralized securities supervisory system, with the power to regulate and supervise securities issuers, as well as to investigate, and impose penalties for illegal activities related to securities and futures.

 

The Company will be subject to CRSC rules and regulations and has not received approval at this time. As such, we will be required to submit information about our business to CRSC for approval and will be subject to continued compliance. In addition, if we decide to implement a VIE structure, the CRSC could deny us permission as an issuer to foreign investors if it is ruled that VIE’s are illegal.

 

The value of our stock could decline or become worthless. The CRSC and SEC are working together to ensure compliance and protection of foreign investor rules. The Company could be delisted as a result of not complying with these rules.

 

If, in the future, we become noncompliant with CRSC rules, our business operations could be suspended and our stock could be worthless. In addition, the CRSC could deny us permission as an issuer to foreign investors if it is ruled that VIE’s are illegal.

 

The Company will also be under the oversight of CFDA. The CFDA establishes safety regulations for the food industry, including the trading in agricultural products, food processing and food supply chain management. We will be required to submit information about our business and receive a license to do business. CFDA and will be subject to continued compliance with CFDA regulation.

 

 

 

 

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If we become noncompliance with CFDA rules, our business operation could be suspended. In addition, CFDA could deny our application for licensing.

 

The value of the Company’s stock could decline or become worthless. The CAC, CRSC and CFDA are working to ensure compliance and protection of foreign investors, global security and safety of our products and services. The Company could be delisted as a result of not complying with these rules and its shareholders could lose the some or all of their investment.

 

The assertion of new regulation by the Chinese government could hinder our ability to continue to offer our stock to foreign investors and our ability to execute of our business plan.

 

Our company may conduct operations in China and may acquire Chinese companies as subsidiaries to carry out its plan of operation. Daily operations in PRC include purchase of raw materials, manufacturing, selling, hiring labor forces, and R&D. Cash associated with these activities will circulate in PRC in the form of local currency. Activities such as raising capitals to support PRC operations, hiring US employees, paying for working capital, and paying out dividends will involve cross-border payments.

 

Cross-border payments must comply with the relevant regulation of the China State Administration of Foreign Exchange (SAFE). PRC adopts a partial foreign exchange administration. Foreign currency is forbidden to circulate within the territory. It allows exchange and payment on current accounts such as trading while implementing certain controls on capital accounts such as investment. Shanghai Free-Trade Zone even implements a more relaxed policy.

 

Payrolls and working capitals are on current accounts. Investment and dividends payment will be on capital accounts. We may face obstacles even if transactions are legal and reasonable after proper registration. So far, the Company has not yet to establish a VIE nor has determined the structure. However. There have been no transfers, dividends, or distributions as of this date.

 

In compliance with US laws, PRC laws and regulations, we will also work out financial plans to establish cash flow to parent company, subsidiaries level and VIE level regarding daily operation and dividends pay out, if we choose to utilize a VIE structure.

 

We could be restricted by PRC laws. There is no guarantee that cash will be distrusted from businesses, including subsidiaries and/or consolidated VIEs, to the parent company. There is also no guarantee we will have the ability to settle amounts owed under the contemplated VIE agreements.

 

If we merge or acquire a company located in China we will subject to extensive national, provincial and local governmental regulations, policies and controls. Central governmental authorities and provincial and local authorities and agencies regulate many aspects of Chinese industries, including without limitation, among others and in addition to specific industry-related regulations, the following aspects:

 

  · banking regulations
  · environmental protection laws and regulations;
  · security laws and regulations;
  · establishment of or changes in shareholder of foreign investment enterprises;
  · foreign exchange;
  · taxes, duties and fees;
  · cyber security and information protection laws and regulations

 

 

 

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The liabilities, costs, obligations, and requirements associated with these laws and regulations may be material, may delay the commencement of operations. Failure to comply with the relevant laws and regulations in our contemplated operations may result in various penalties, and thus adversely and materially affect our business, prospects, and financial condition. While we plan to comply with the relevant laws and regulations in the development and operation of our contemplated business combination, we may incur additional costs in order to fulfill such requirements, and we cannot assure you that we have complied with or will comply with the requirements of all relevant laws and regulations. Additionally, there can be no assurance that the relevant government agencies will not change such laws or regulations or impose additional or more stringent laws or regulations. We cannot assure you that we will comply with the requirements of all new laws and regulations. Compliance with such laws or regulations may require us to incur material capital expenditures or other obligations or liabilities.

 

Furthermore, if future legislations mandate further actions to be taken by companies, we may face substantial uncertainties as to whether we can complete such actions in a timely manner, or at all. If we fail to take appropriate and timely measures to comply with any of these or similar regulatory compliance requirements, our current corporate structure, corporate governance, and business operations could be materially and adversely affected.

 

Any actions by the Chinese government to exert more oversight and control over offerings that are conducted overseas and/or foreign investment in China-based issuers could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors and cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or be worthless.

 

If we adopt a VIE structure, the Company will comply with US laws, PRC laws and regulations. the Company will also work out financial plans to establish cash flow to parent company, subsidiaries level and VIE level regarding daily operation and dividends pay out. However, there is no guarantee that cash will be distributed from businesses, including subsidiaries and/or consolidated VIEs, to the parent company. There is also no guarantee we will have the ability to settle amounts owed under the VIE agreements. If this occurs our business would be greatly affected, and our stock could decline or become worthless. In addition, the investor could lose all their investment.

 

In compliance with US laws and PRC laws and regulations, the Company will also work out financial plans to guarantee cash flow on parent company level, subsidiaries level and VIE level regarding daily operation and dividends pay out.

 

Our Auditor is U.S. based, registered with the PCAOB, and is subject to PCAOB inspections

 

The Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act (“HFCAA”) became law in December 2020 and prohibits foreign companies from listing their securities on U.S. exchanges if the auditor has been unavailable for PCAOB inspection or investigation for three consecutive years.

 

The HFCAA requires the SEC to identify registrants that have retained a registered public accounting firm to issue an audit report where that registered public accounting firm has a branch or office that:

· Identify areas of shortage in the agricultural trade industry
  ·Is located in a foreign jurisdiction; and
· Identify areas of shortage in the agricultural trade industry
  ·The PCAOB has determined that it is unable to inspect or investigate completely because of a position taken by an authority in the foreign jurisdiction
· Identify areas of shortage in the agricultural trade industry
  ·As reflected on the PCAOB's website, the PCAOB is currently unable to inspect or investigate accounting firms due to a position of the local authority in two jurisdictions: China and Hong Kong

 

 

 

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If the PCAOB is unable to inspect the issuer's public accounting firm for three consecutive years, the issuer's securities are banned from trade on a national exchange or through other methods. The United States Senate passed the Accelerating Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act, which, if enacted, would decrease the number of non-inspection years from three years to two years.

 

On December 16, 2021, the following amendments to the HCFAA were adopted by the Securities and Exchange Commission:

 

Consistent with the HFCAA, the final amendments require Commission-Identified Issuers to submit documentation to the SEC through the EDGAR system on or before its annual report due date that establishes that it is not owned or controlled by a governmental entity in its public accounting firm’s foreign jurisdiction. The final amendments also require a Commission-Identified Issuer that is also a “foreign issuer,” as defined in Exchange Act Rule 3b-4, to provide certain additional specified disclosures in their annual report for itself and its consolidated foreign operating entity or entities, including any variable-interest entity or similar structure that results in additional foreign entities being consolidated in the registrant’s financial statements.

 

The required disclosures include:

· During the period covered by the form, the registered public accounting firm has prepared an audit
· report for the issuer;
· The percentage of the shares of the issuer owned by governmental entities in the foreign
· jurisdiction in which the issuer is incorporated or otherwise organized;
· Whether governmental entities in the applicable foreign jurisdiction with respect to that registered
· public accounting firm have a controlling financial interest with respect to the issuer;
· The name of each official of the Chinese Communist Party who is a member of the board of directors of the issuer or the operating entity with respect to the issuer; and
· Whether the articles of incorporation of the issuer (or equivalent organizing document) contains any charter of the Chinese Communist Party, including the text of any such charter.

 

The SEC will identify a registrant as a Commission-Identified Issuer as early as possible after the registrant files its annual report and on a rolling basis. The SEC will “provisionally identify” a registrant as a Commission-Identified Issuer on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov/HFCAA. For 15 business days after this provisional identification, a registrant may email the SEC if it believes it has been incorrectly identified, providing evidence supporting its claim. After reviewing the information, the registrant will be notified whether the SEC will “conclusively identify” the registrant as a Commission-Identified Issuer.

 

A Commission-Identified Issuer is a registrant identified by the SEC as having filed an annual report with an audit report issued by a registered public accounting firm that is located in a foreign jurisdiction and that the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB) is unable to inspect or investigate completely because of a position taken by an authority in that jurisdiction (PCAOB-Identified Firm). The SEC will identify such issuers promptly after the filing of their annual reports by evaluating whether the annual report contains an audit report signed by a PCAOB-Identified Firm. We may be subject to the HFCAA if we are identified as a "Commission-Identified Issuer" in accordance with such HFCAA amendments

 

If the registrant does not contact the SEC to dispute the provisional identification within 15 business days, the SEC will conclusively identify the registrant as a Commission-Identified Issuer. The SEC will publish a list on its website identifying Commission-Identified Issuers, indicating the number of years a Commission-Identified Issuer has been published on the list, and noting whether the Commission-Identified Issuer has been subject to any prior trading prohibitions.

 

 

 

 

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The HFCAA requires the SEC to prohibit the trading of the securities of certain Commission Identified Issuers on a national securities exchange or through any other method that is within the jurisdiction of the SEC to regulate, including through over-the-counter trading. As a result, the SEC will impose an initial trading prohibition on a registrant as soon as practicable after it is conclusively identified as a Commission-Identified Issuer for three consecutive years.

 

If the SEC ends the initial trading prohibition and, thereafter, the registrant is again determined to be a Commission-Identified Issuer, the SEC will impose a subsequent trading prohibition on the registrant for a minimum of five years. To end an initial or subsequent trading prohibition, a Commission-Identified Issuer must certify that it has retained or will retain a registered public accounting firm that the PCAOB has determined it is able to inspect or investigate. To make that certification, the Commission-Identified Issuer must file financial statements that include an audit report signed by such a registered public accounting firm.

 

Our auditor, BFBorgers CPA PC, is required to undergo regular inspections by the PCAOB as an auditor of companies that are publicly traded in the United States and a firm registered with the PCAOB. BFBorgers CPA PC will be subject to the HFCAA adopted amendments if it is located within the PRC jurisdiction where the PCAOB is unable to conduct inspections without the approval of the Chinese government authorities. If our auditor is not inspected by the PCAOB as specified in the HFCAA, our securities may be prohibited from trading, and this ultimately could result in being delisted.

 

The PRC Anti-monopoly Law Requires Approval for Merger & Acquisition

 

Under the PRC Anti-monopoly Law, merger & acquisitions that meet certain turnover thresholds must notify the State Administration for Market Regulation (“SAMR”) for merger control clearance and may not be implemented without SAMR’s approval.

 

The Company may merge with, or acquire, a target company to commence its business operations. If our target business meets the threshold for review by SAMR, Ministry of Commerce (“MOFCOM”), and other national security laws. We will be required to submit applications for review to these regulatory agencies.

 

The SAMR utilizes a substantive test for merger review. The substantive test takes into consideration the:

· Identify areas of shortage in the agricultural trade industry
  ·Market shares and market control power of the business operators concerned
· Identify areas of shortage in the agricultural trade industry
  ·Concentration levels of relevant markets
· Identify areas of shortage in the agricultural trade industry
  ·Impact of the concentration on market entry, technological development, consumers and other relevant operators
· Identify areas of shortage in the agricultural trade industry
  ·Impact of the concentration on national economic development
· Identify areas of shortage in the agricultural trade industry
  ·Foreign investment

 

If the merger or acquisition does not meet the SAMR criteria, our application will be denied.

 

There are material risks to the issuer and its investors if it is determined that the PCAOB is unable to inspect our auditor because of a position taken by an authority in a foreign jurisdiction. The inability to thoroughly inspect or investigate our auditor may cause trading in our securities to be prohibited and an exchange may determine to delist our securities. As a result, our securities could be delisted rendering our stock worthless.

 

 

 

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Such action could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors and cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or be worthless.

 

MOFCOM requires the disclosure of the control persons, defined as any natural person, enterprise, government authority, or international organization that ultimately exercises control over a foreign investment enterprise directly or indirectly through equity interests, contract, trust, or any other means. China has escalated the national security review system (“NSR”) as requested by the MOFCOM. China expanded the scope of its national security review to capture transactions between two foreign parties involving a Chinese company or Chinese interests in conjunctions with PRC Foreign Investment Law and its implementation regulations.

 

In addition to the NSR system, MOFCOM promulgated the Provisions on the Unreliable Entity List (UEL), under which foreign individuals and entities who are on the UEL may be restricted or prohibited from investing in China. The Company is not on the list of as this time and the list is constantly changing.

 

Actions by the Chinese government to exert more oversight and control over offerings that are conducted overseas and/or foreign investment in China-based issuers could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors and cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or be worthless.

 

Our business is subject to conflicting laws and regulations in China

 

We are subject to differing and sometimes conflicting laws and regulations in the various China jurisdictions where we provide our services. New laws and regulations may be adopted from time to time to address new issues that come to the authorities' attention. In addition, considerable uncertainties still exist with respect to the interpretation and implementation of existing laws and regulations governing our contemplated business activities. A large number of proposals are before various national, regional, and local legislative bodies and regulatory entities regarding issues related to our industry or our business model. As we implement our business plan and expand into new cities or countries or as we add new products and services to our platform, we may become subject to additional laws and regulations that we are not subject to now. Existing or new laws and regulations could expose us to substantial liability, including significant expenses necessary to comply with such laws and regulations, and could dampen our growth, which could adversely affect our business and results of operations. Such action could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors and cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or be worthless.

 

Risks related to PRC Securities Law that prevent access to information and regulatory oversight of U.S. authorities

 

PRC Securities Law state that no overseas securities regulator can directly conduct investigations or evidence collection activities within the PRC and no entity or individual in China may provide documents and information relating to securities business activities to overseas regulators without Chinese government approval. The SEC, U.S. Department of Justice, and other U.S. authorities face substantial challenges in bringing and enforcing actions against China-based Issuers and their officers and directors. As a result, investors in China-based Issuers may not benefit from a regulatory environment that fosters effective enforcement of U.S. federal securities laws.

 

Risks related to China’s evolving regulatory environment

 

China’s legal system is substantially different from the legal system in the United States and may raise risks and uncertainties concerning the intent, effect, and enforcement of its laws, rules, and regulations, including those that restrict the inflow and outflow of foreign capital or provide the Chinese government with significant authority to exert influence on a China-based Issuer’s ability to conduct business or raise capital. This lack of certainty may result in the inconsistent and unpredictable interpretation and enforcement of laws, rules, and regulations, which may change quickly. China-based Issuers face risks related to evolving laws and regulations, which could impede their ability to obtain or maintain permits or licenses required to conduct business in China. In the absence of required permits or licenses, governmental authorities may impose material sanctions or penalties on the company. The Chinese government may intervene or influence our operations at any time, which could result in a material change in our operations and/or the value of our common stock. Such actions could significantly limit or completely hinder your ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors and cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or be worthless.

 

 

 

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Legal limitations on shareholder rights and recourse for legal claims

 

Legal claims, including federal securities law claims, against China-based Issuers may be difficult or impossible for investors to pursue in U.S. courts. Even if an investor obtains a judgment in a U.S. court, the investor may be unable to enforce such judgment, particularly in the case of a China-based Issuer, where the related assets or persons are typically located outside of the United States and in jurisdictions that may not recognize or enforce U.S. judgments. If an investor is unable to bring a U.S. claim or collect on a U.S. judgment, the investor may have to rely on legal claims and remedies available in China or other overseas jurisdictions where the China-based Issuer may maintain assets. The claims and remedies available in these jurisdictions are often significantly different from those available in the United States.

 

Resale limitations of Rule 144(i) on your shares

 

According to the Rule 144(i), Rule 144 is not available for the resale of securities initially issued by either a reporting or non-reporting shell company. Moreover, Rule 144(i)(1)(ii) states that Rule 144 is not available to securities initially issued by an issuer that has been “at any time previously” a reporting or non-reporting shell company. Rule 144(i)(1)(ii) prohibits shareholders from utilizing Rule 144 to sell their shares in a company that at any time in its existence was a shell company. However, according to Rule 144(i)(2), an issuer can “cure” its shell status.

 

To “cure” a company’s current or former shell company status, the conditions of Rule 144(i)(2) must be satisfied regardless of the time that has elapsed since the public company ceased to be a shell company and regardless of when the shares were issued. The availability of Rule 144 for resales of shares issued while the company is a shell company or thereafter may be restricted even after the expiration of the one-year period since it filed its Form 10 information if the company is not current on all of its periodic reports required to be filed within the SEC during the 12 months before the date of the shareholder’s sale. Thus, the company must file all 10-Qs and 10K for the preceding 12 months and since the filing of the Form 10, or Rule 144 is not available for the resale of securities.

 

There is no guarantee that our business model will be profitable, we have extremely limited assets, have incurred operating losses, and have no current source of revenue

 

We have had minimal assets. We do not expect to generate revenues until we begin to implement our business plan. However, we can provide no assurance that we will produce any material revenues for our stockholders, or that our business will operate on a profitable basis.

 

We will, likely, sustain operating expenses without corresponding revenues, at least until the consummation of our business plan. This may result in our incurring a net operating loss that will increase unless we consummate a business plan with a profitable business or internally develop our business. We cannot assure you that we can identify a suitable business combination or successfully internally develop our business, or that any such business will be profitable at the time of its acquisition by the Company or ever.

 

Our auditors have deemed our Company as a going concern and capital resources may not be sufficient to fund our anticipated future operating needs

 

We have historically generated negative cash flow and losses from operations and could experience negative cash flow and losses from operations in the future. Our independent auditors have included an explanatory paragraph in their report on our financial statements for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2020, and 2019 expressing doubt regarding our ability to continue as a going concern. We currently only have a minimal amount of cash available, which will not be sufficient to fund our anticipated future operating needs. The Company will need to raise substantial sums to implement its business plan. There can be no assurance that the Company will be successful in raising funds. To the extent that the Company is unable to raise funds, we will be required to reduce our planned operations or cease any operations.

 

 

 

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We may encounter substantial competition in food supply chain industry and our failure to compete effectively may adversely affect our ability to generate revenue

 

Food chain supply is a competitive industry. We believe that existing and new competitors will continue to improve in cost control and performance of their food processing and delivery methods. We have global competitors, and we will be required to continue to invest in product development and productivity improvements to compete effectively in our markets. Our competitors could develop a more efficient product delivery system or undertake more aggressive and costly marketing campaigns than ours, which may adversely affect our marketing strategies and could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Our major competitors may be better able than we to successfully endure downturns in our industrial sector. In periods of reduced demand for our product, we can either choose to maintain market share by reducing our selling prices to meet competition or maintain selling prices, which would likely sacrifice market share. Sales and overall profitability would be reduced in either case. In addition, we cannot assure you that additional competitors will not enter our existing markets, or that we will be able to compete successfully against existing or new competition.

 

Environmental laws compliance

 

We believe we are in compliance with all applicable environmental laws, food safety laws, and international trade laws in all material respects. We do not expect future compliance with these laws to have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

We may not be able to obtain China’s regulatory approvals for our product

 

Our business is subject to China laws and regulations governing agriculture, food processing, supply chain management, and other matters. The Company believes acquisition of already accredited private corporations will mitigate this risk. All operating plans have been made in consideration of existing codes and regulations.

 

We face a number of risks associated with our business plan, including the possibility that we may incur substantial debt or convertible debt, which could adversely affect our financial condition

 

We intend to use reasonable efforts to complete our business plan. The risks commonly encountered in implementing our business plan is insufficient revenues to offset increased expenses associated with finding a merger candidate. Failure to raise sufficient capital to carry out our business plan. Additionally, we have no operations at this time so our expenses are likely to increase and it is possible that we may incur substantial debt or convertible debt in order to complete our business plan, which can adversely affect our financial condition. Incurring a substantial amount of debt or convertible debt may require us to use a significant portion of our cash flow to pay principal and interest on the debt, which will reduce the amount available to fund working capital, capital expenditures, and other general purposes. Our indebtedness may negatively impact our ability to operate our business and limit our ability to borrow additional funds by increasing our borrowing costs, and impact the terms, conditions, and restrictions contained in possible future debt agreements, including the addition of more restrictive covenants; impact our flexibility in planning for and reacting to changes in our business as covenants and restrictions contained in possible future debt arrangements may require that we meet certain financial tests and place restrictions on the incurrence of additional indebtedness and place us at a disadvantage compared to similar companies in our industry that have less debt.

 

Our future success is highly dependent on the ability of management to locate and attract suitable business opportunities

 

At this time, we have no operations and future implementation of our food supply chain business plan is highly speculative, there is a consequent risk of loss of an investment in the Company. The success of our plan of operations will depend to a great extent on the operations, financial condition and management of future business and internal development. While management intends to seek businesses opportunities with entities having established operating histories, we cannot provide any assurance that we will be successful in locating opportunities meeting that criterion. In the event we complete a business plan, the success of our operations will be dependent upon management, its financial position and numerous other factors beyond our control.

 

 

 

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There can be no assurance that we will successfully consummate our food supply chain business plan or internally develop a successful business

 

We are a development company and can give no assurance that we will successfully identify and evaluate suitable business opportunities or that we will successfully implement our business plan. We cannot guarantee that we will be able to negotiate contracts on favorable terms. No assurances can be given that we will successfully identify and evaluate suitable business opportunities, that we will conclude a business plan or that we will be able to develop a successful business. Our management and affiliates will play an integral role in establishing the terms for any future business.

 

We will incur increased costs as a result of becoming a reporting company, and given our limited capital resources, such additional costs may have an adverse impact on our profitability.

 

Following the effectiveness of this Form 10, we will be an SEC reporting company. The Company currently has no business and no revenue. However, the rules and regulations under the Exchange Act require a public company to provide periodic reports with interactive data files which will require the Company to engage legal, accounting and auditing services, and XBRL and EDGAR service providers. The engagement of such services can be costly, and the Company is likely to incur losses, which may adversely affect the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. In addition, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as well as a variety of related rules implemented by the SEC, have required changes in corporate governance practices and generally increased the disclosure requirements of public companies. For example, as a result of becoming a reporting company, we will be required to file periodic and current reports and other information with the SEC and we must adopt policies regarding disclosure controls and procedures and regularly evaluate those controls and process.

 

The additional costs we will incur in connection with becoming a reporting company will serve to further stretch our limited capital resources. The expenses incurred for filing periodic reports and implementing disclosure controls and procedures may be as high as $70,000 USD annually. In other words, due to our limited resources, we may have to allocate resources away from other productive uses in order to pay any expenses we incur in order to comply with our obligations as an SEC reporting company. Further, there is no guarantee that we will have sufficient resources to meet our reporting and filing obligations with the SEC as they come due.

 

The time and cost of preparing a private company to become a public reporting company may preclude us from entering into an acquisition or merger with the most attractive private companies and others

 

From time to time the Company may come across target merger companies. These companies may fail to comply with SEC reporting requirements may delay or preclude acquisitions. Sections 13 and 15(d) of the Exchange Act require reporting companies to provide certain information about significant acquisitions, including certified financial statements for the company acquired, covering one or two years, depending on the relative size of the acquisition. The time and additional costs that may be incurred by some target entities to prepare these statements may significantly delay or essentially preclude consummation of an acquisition. Otherwise, suitable acquisition prospects that do not have or are unable to obtain the required audited statements may be inappropriate for acquisition so long as the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act are applicable.

 

A Business may result in a change of control and a change of management.

 

In conjunction with completion of a business acquisition of a food supply chain company, it is anticipated that we may issue an amount of our authorized but unissued common or preferred stock which represents the majority of the voting power and equity of our capital stock, which would result in stockholders of a target company obtaining a controlling interest in us. As a condition of the business combination agreement, our current stockholders may agree to sell or transfer all or a portion of our common stock as to provide the target company with all or majority control. The resulting change in control may result in removal of our present officers and directors and a corresponding reduction in or elimination of their participation in any future affairs.

 

 

 

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We depend on our officers and the loss of their services would have an adverse effect on our business

 

We have officers and directors of the Company that are critical to our chances for success in the food supply chain business. We are dependent on their services to operate our business and the loss of these persons, or any of them would have an adverse impact on our future operations until such time as he or she could be replaced, if he could be replaced. We do not have employment contracts or employment agreements with our officers, and we do not carry key man life insurance on their lives.

 

Because we are significantly smaller than some of our competitors, we may lack the resources needed to capture market share

 

The food processing and supermarket supply chain management industry is highly competitive, and our business plan has not been implemented and we are smaller in size than some of our competitors. We are at a disadvantage as a development stage company, we do not have an established business. Many of our competitors have an already established their business, more established market presence, and substantially greater financial, marketing, and other resources than do we. New competitors may emerge and may develop new or innovative products that compete with our anticipated future production. No assurance can be given that we will be able to compete successfully within this industry.

 

Our ability to use our net operating loss carry-forwards and certain other tax attributes may be limited

 

We have incurred losses during our history. To the extent that we continue to generate taxable losses, unused losses will carry forward to offset future taxable income, if any, until such unused losses expire. Under Sections 382 and 383 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, if a corporation undergoes an “ownership change,” generally defined as a greater than 50% change (by value) in its equity ownership over a three-year period, the corporation’s ability to use its pre-change net operating loss carry-forwards, or NOLs, and other pre-change tax attributes (such as research tax credits) to offset its post-change income may be limited. We may experience ownership changes in the future because of subsequent shifts in our stock ownership. As a result, if we earn net taxable income, our ability to use our pre-change net operating loss carryforwards to offset U.S. federal taxable income may be subject to limitations, which could potentially result in increased future tax liability to us. In addition, at the state level, there may be periods during which the use of NOLs is suspended or otherwise limited, which could accelerate or permanently increase state taxes owed.

 

Our ability to hire and retain key personnel will be an important factor in the success of our business and a failure to hire and retain key personnel may result in our inability to manage and implement our business plan

 

Our management has limited experience in the food processing and supermarket supply chain management industry, and we may not be able to attract and retain the necessary qualified personnel. If we are unable to retain or to hire qualified personnel as required, we may not be able to adequately manage and implement our business plan.

 

Legal disputes could have an impact on our Company

 

We plan to engage in business matters that are common to the business world that can result in disputations of a legal nature. In the event the Company is ever sued or finds it necessary to bring suit against others, there is the potential that the results of any such litigation could have an adverse impact on the Company.

 

Our common stock is listed on the OTC MARKETS. An investment in our common stock is risky and there can be no assurance that the price for our stock will not decrease substantially in the future

 

Our common stock is not currently trading on any exchange. The Company is listed on OTC Markets under the Expert Market tier, meaning there are no available stock price quotes, and you may not buy our stock in the open market. In the past, the market for our stock has been volatile and has been characterized by large swings in the trading price that do not appear to be directly related to our business or financial condition. As a result, an investment in our common stock is risky and there can be no assurance that the price for our stock will not decrease substantially in the future.

 

 

 

 17 

 

 

 

Our officers, directors and principal stockholders own a large percentage of our issued and outstanding shares and other stockholders have little or no ability to elect directors or influence corporate matters

 

Our officers, directors, and principal stockholders were deemed to be the beneficial owners of approximately of our 64.73% issued and outstanding shares of common stock. As a result, such persons can determine the outcome of any actions taken by us that require stockholder approval. For example, they will be able to elect all of our directors and control the policies and practices of the Company.

 

 

Risks Related to Our Shareholders and Shares of Common Stock

 

Our stock trades below $5.00 per share and is subject to special sales practice requirements that could have an adverse impact on any trading market that may develop for our stock

 

If our stock trades below $5.00 per share and is subject to special sales practice requirements applicable to "penny stocks" which are imposed on broker-dealers who sell low-priced securities of this type. These rules may be anticipated to affect the ability of broker-dealers to sell our stock, which may in turn be anticipated to have an adverse impact on the market price for our stock if and when an active trading market should develop.

 

There is presently no public market for our securities and rule 144 is not currently available

 

Our common stock is not currently trading on any exchange and a robust and active trading market may never develop. Because of our current status as a “shell company,” Rule 144 is not currently available. Future sales of our common stock by existing stockholders pursuant to an effective registration statement or upon the availability of Rule 144 could adversely affect the market price of our common stock. A shareholder who decides to sell some, or all, of their shares in a private transaction may be unable to locate persons who are willing to purchase the shares, given the restrictions. Also, because of the various risk factors described above, the price of the publicly traded common stock may be highly volatile and not provide the true market price of our common stock.

 

Our stock is not traded, so you may be unable to sell your shares at or near the quoted bid prices if you need to sell a significant number of your shares

 

Even if our stock becomes trading, it is likely that our common stock will be thinly traded, meaning that the number of persons interested in purchasing our common shares at or near bid prices at any given time may be relatively small or non-existent. This situation is attributable to a number of factors, including the fact that we are a small company which is relatively unknown to stock analysts, stock brokers, institutional investors and others in the investment community that generate or influence sales volume, and that even if we came to the attention of such persons, they tend to be risk-averse and would be reluctant to follow an unproven company such as ours or purchase or recommend the purchase of our shares until such time as we became more seasoned and viable.

 

Consequently, there may be periods of several days or more when trading activity in our shares is minimal or non-existent, as compared to a seasoned issuer which has a large and steady volume of trading activity that will generally support continuous sales without an adverse effect on share price. We cannot give you any assurance that a broader or more active public trading market for our common shares will develop or be sustained, or that current trading levels will be sustained. Due to these conditions, we can give you no assurance that you will be able to sell your shares at or near bid prices or at all if you need money or otherwise desire to liquidate your shares.

 

 

 

 18 

 

 

Our common stock is be considered a “penny stock,” and thereby be subject to additional sale and trading regulations that may make it more difficult to sell

 

A common stock is a “penny stock” if it meets one or more of the following conditions (i) the stock trades at a price less than $5.00 per share; (ii) it is not traded on a “recognized” national exchange; (iii) it is not quoted on the Nasdaq Capital Market, or even if so, has a price less than $5.00 per share; or (iv) is issued by a company that has been in business less than three years with net tangible assets less than $5 million.

 

The principal result or effect of being designated a “penny stock” is that securities broker-dealers participating in sales of our common stock will be subject to the “penny stock” regulations set forth in Rules 15g-2 through 15g-9 promulgated under the Exchange Act. For example, Rule 15g-2 requires broker-dealers dealing in penny stocks to provide potential investors with a document disclosing the risks of penny stocks and to obtain a manually signed and dated written receipt of the document at least two business days before effecting any transaction in a penny stock for the investor’s account. Moreover, Rule 15g-9 requires broker-dealers in penny stocks to approve the account of any investor for transactions in such stocks before selling any penny stock to that investor. This procedure requires the broker-dealer to (i) obtain from the investor information concerning his or her financial situation, investment experience and investment objectives; (ii) reasonably determine, based on that information, that transactions in penny stocks are suitable for the investor and that the investor has sufficient knowledge and experience as to be reasonably capable of evaluating the risks of penny stock transactions; (iii) provide the investor with a written statement setting forth the basis on which the broker-dealer made the determination in (ii) above; and (iv) receive a signed and dated copy of such statement from the investor, confirming that it accurately reflects the investor’s financial situation, investment experience and investment objectives. Compliance with these requirements may make it more difficult and time consuming for holders of our common stock to resell their shares to third parties or to otherwise dispose of them in the market or otherwise.

 

We may issue more shares in an acquisition or merger, which will result in substantial dilution

 

Our Articles of Incorporation, as amended, authorize the Company to issue an aggregate of 200,000,000 shares of common stock of which 46,344,728 shares are currently outstanding and 0 shares of Preferred Stock are authorized, of which 0 shares are outstanding. Any acquisition or merger effected by the Company may result in the issuance of additional securities without stockholder approval and may result in substantial dilution in the percentage of our common stock held by our then existing stockholders. Moreover, shares of our common stock issued in any such merger or acquisition transaction may be valued on an arbitrary or non-arm’s-length basis by our management, resulting in an additional reduction in the percentage of common stock held by our then existing stockholders. In an acquisition type transaction, our Board of Directors has the power to issue any, or all, of such authorized but unissued shares without stockholder approval. To the extent that additional shares of common stock are issued in connection with a business combination or otherwise, dilution to the interests of our stockholders will occur and the rights of the holders of common stock might be materially adversely affected.

 

Obtaining additional capital though the sale of common stock will result in dilution of stockholder interests

 

We may raise additional funds in the future by issuing additional shares of common stock or other securities, which may include securities such as convertible debentures, warrants or preferred stock that are convertible into common stock. Any such sale of common stock or other securities will lead to further dilution of the equity ownership of existing holders of our common stock. Additionally, the existing conversion rights may hinder future equity offerings, and the exercise of those conversion rights may have an adverse effect on the value of our stock. If any such conversion rights are exercised at a price below the then current market price of our shares, then the market price of our stock could decrease upon the sale of such additional securities. Further, if any such conversion rights are exercised at a price below the price at which any stockholder purchased shares, then that particular stockholder will experience dilution in his or her investment.

 

 

 

 19 

 

 

Our directors have the authority to authorize the issuance of preferred stock

 

Our Articles of Incorporation, as amended, authorize the Company to issue an aggregate of 0 shares of Preferred Stock. Our directors, without further action by our stockholders, have the authority to issue shares to be determined by our board of directors of Preferred Stock with the relative rights, conversion rights, voting rights, preferences, special rights, and qualifications as determined by the board without approval by the shareholders. Any issuance of Preferred Stock could adversely affect the rights of holders of common stock. Additionally, any future issuance of preferred stock may have the effect of delaying, deferring, or preventing a change in control of the Company without further action by the shareholders and may adversely affect the voting and other rights of the holders of common stock. Our Board does not intend to seek shareholder approval prior to any issuance of currently authorized stock, unless otherwise required by law or stock exchange rules.

 

We have never paid dividends on our common stock, nor are we likely to pay dividends in the foreseeable future. Therefore, you may not derive any income solely from ownership of our stock

 

We have never declared or paid dividends on our common stock and do not presently intend to pay any dividends in the foreseeable future. We anticipate that any funds available for payment of dividends will be re-invested into the Company to further our business strategy. This means that your potential for economic gain from ownership of our stock depends on appreciation of our stock price and will only be realized by a sale of the stock at a price higher than your purchase price.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 20 

 

 

PART IV

 

ITEM 15. EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

 

Please see the “Exhibit Index,” which is incorporated herein by reference, following the signature page for a list of our exhibits.

 

EXHIBIT INDEX

 

31.1   Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 13(a)-14(a)/15(d)-14(a) of the Securities Act of 1934
     
31.2   Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Rule 13(a)-14(a)/15(d)-14(a) of the Securities Act of 1934
     
32.1   Certification of Chief Executive Officer Executive Officer under Section 1350 as Adopted pursuant Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
     
32.2   Certification of Chief Financial Officer under Section 1350 as Adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 21 

 

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

  JJY Holding Group
  (Registrant)
     
Date: August 9, 2022 By: /s/ Yanping Sheng
    Yanping Sheng
    Chief Executive Officer
    Chief Financial Officer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 22 

EXHIBIT 31.1

 

CERTIFICATIONS

 

I, Yanping Sheng, certify that:

 

1. I have reviewed this annual report of JJY Holding Group;
   
2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;
   
3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;
   
4. The registrant’s other certifying officer and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in the Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d – 15(f)) for the registrant and have:

 

  a) Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;
     
  b) Designed such internal controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;
     
  c) Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrants disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and
     
  d) Disclosed in this report any change in the registrants internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrants most recent fiscal quarter that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and

 

5. The registrant’s other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing equivalent functions):

 

  a) All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal controls over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and,
     
  b) Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

Date: August 9, 2022 By: /s/ Yanping Sheng
    Yanping Sheng
    Chief Executive Officer

EXHIBIT 31.2

 

CERTIFICATIONS

 

I, Yanping Sheng, certify that:

 

1. I have reviewed this annual report of JJY Holding Group;
   
2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;
   
3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;
   
4. The registrant’s other certifying officer and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in the Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d – 15(f)) for the registrant and have:

 

  a) Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;
     
  b) Designed such internal controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;
     
  c) Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and
     
  d) Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrants most recent fiscal quarter that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and

 

5. The registrant’s other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing equivalent functions):

 

  a) All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal controls over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and,
     
  b) Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

Date: August 9, 2022 By: /s/ Yanping Sheng
    Yanping Sheng
    Chief Financial Officer

 

EXHIBIT 32.1

 

CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO

18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350,

AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO

SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

 

In connection with the Annual Report on Form 10-K Amendment No. 1 for the year ended December 31, 2021 of JJY Holding Group, a Nevada corporation (the “Company”), as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on the date hereof (the “Report”), I, Yanping Sheng, Chief Executive Officer of the Company certify, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350 as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, that:

 

1. The Annual Report fully complies with the requirements of Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended; and

 

2. The information contained in this Annual Report fairly presents, in all material respects, the financial condition and results of operation of the Company.

 

Date: August 9, 2022 By: /s/ Yanping Sheng
    Yanping Sheng
    Chief Executive Officer

EXHIBIT 32.2

 

CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO

18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350,

AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO

SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

 

In connection with the Annual Report on Form 10-K Amendment No. 1 for the year ended December 31, 2021 of JJY Holding Group, a Nevada corporation (the “Company”), as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on the date hereof (the “Report”), I, Yanping Sheng, Chief Financial Officer of the Company certify, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350 as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, that:

 

1. The Annual Report fully complies with the requirements of Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended; and

 

2. The information contained in this Annual Report fairly presents, in all material respects, the financial condition and results of operation of the Company.

 

Date: August 9, 2022 By: /s/ Yanping Sheng
    Yanping Sheng
    Chief Financial Officer


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