Form 10-K AMERICAN STATES WATER For: Dec 31

February 22, 2022 4:44 PM EST

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awr-20211231
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SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
 
FORM 10-K
 
FOR ANNUAL AND TRANSITION REPORTS
PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE
SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
(Mark One)
       Annual Report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021 or
       Transition report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 for the transition period from          to
Commission
File Number
 Registrant, State of Incorporation
Address, Zip Code and Telephone Number
 IRS Employer
Identification No.
001-14431 American States Water Company 95-4676679
Incorporated in California
630 E. Foothill Boulevard,San DimasCA91773-1212
(909)394-3600
001-12008 Golden State Water Company 95-1243678
Incorporated in California
630 E. Foothill Boulevard,San DimasCA91773-1212
(909)394-3600
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of Each ClassTrading SymbolName of Each Exchange on Which Registered
American States Water Company Common SharesAWRNew York Stock Exchange
 Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:   None
 
Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.
American States Water CompanyYesNo
Golden State Water CompanyYesNo
 
 
Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.
American States Water CompanyYesNo
Golden State Water CompanyYesNo
 
Indicate by check mark whether Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
American States Water CompanyYesNo
Golden State Water CompanyYesNo

Indicate by check mark whether Registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or such shorter period that the Registrant was required to submit and post such files).
American States Water CompanyYesNo
Golden State Water CompanyYesNo

 





Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definition of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
 
American States Water Company
Large accelerated filer Accelerated filer Non-accelerated filerSmaller reporting companyEmerging growth company 
Golden States Water Company
Large accelerated filer  Accelerated filer Non-accelerated filerSmaller reporting companyEmerging growth company 

 
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management's assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act)
American States Water CompanyYesNo
Golden State Water CompanyYesNo
 
The aggregate market value of all voting and non-voting Common Shares held by non-affiliates of American States Water Company was approximately $2,938,292,000 on June 30, 2021, the last business day of the registrant's most recently completed second fiscal quarter, based on the closing price per Common Share of American States Water Company as traded on the New York Stock Exchange.  As of February 18, 2022, the number of Common Shares of American States Water Company outstanding was 36,945,434. As of that same date, American States Water Company owned all 170 outstanding Common Shares of Golden State Water Company. The aggregate market value of all voting stock held by non-affiliates of Golden State Water Company was zero on June 30, 2021.

Golden State Water Company meets the conditions set forth in General Instruction I(1)(a) and (b) of Form 10-K and is therefore filing this Form, in part, with the reduced disclosure format for Golden State Water Company.
 Documents Incorporated by Reference:
Portions of the Proxy Statement of American States Water Company will be subsequently filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission as to Part III, Item Nos. 10, 11, 13 and 14 and portions of Item 12, in each case as specifically referenced herein.



AMERICAN STATES WATER COMPANY
and
GOLDEN STATE WATER COMPANY
 
FORM 10-K
 
INDEX
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
Item 16.Form 10-K Summary
  
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PART I 

Item 1. Business
This annual report on Form 10-K is a combined report being filed by two separate Registrants, American States Water Company (“AWR”) and Golden State Water Company (“GSWC”). References in this report to “Registrant” are to AWR and GSWC, collectively, unless otherwise specified. GSWC makes no representations as to the information contained in this report relating to AWR and its subsidiaries, other than GSWC.
AWR makes its periodic reports, Form 10-Q and Form 10-K, and current reports, Form 8-K, available free of charge through its website, www.aswater.com, as soon as material is electronically filed with or furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Such reports are also available on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov. AWR also makes available free of charge its code of business conduct and ethics, its corporate governance guidelines and the charters of its Nominating and Governance Committee, Compensation Committee and Audit and Finance Committee through its website or by calling (877) 463-6297. AWR and GSWC have filed the certification of officers required by Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act as Exhibits 31.1 and 31.2 to this Form 10-K for fiscal 2021.
Overview
AWR is the parent company of GSWC, Bear Valley Electric Service, Inc. ("BVESI") and American States Utility Services, Inc. (“ASUS”) (and its wholly owned subsidiaries: Fort Bliss Water Services Company (“FBWS”), Terrapin Utility Services, Inc. (“TUS”), Old Dominion Utility Services, Inc. (“ODUS”), Palmetto State Utility Services, Inc. (“PSUS”), Old North Utility Services, Inc. (“ONUS”), Emerald Coast Utility Services, Inc. (“ECUS”) and Fort Riley Utility Services, Inc. (FRUS)). On July 1, 2020, GSWC completed the transfer of the electric utility assets and liabilities from its electric division to BVESI, in exchange for common shares of BVESI. GSWC then immediately distributed all of BVESI's common shares to AWR, whereupon BVESI became wholly owned directly by AWR. This reorganization did not result in any substantive changes to AWR's operations and business segments.
AWR has three reportable segments: water, electric and contracted services. Within the segments, AWR has three principal business units, water and electric service utility operations conducted through its regulated utilities GSWC and BVESI, respectively, and contracted services conducted through ASUS and its subsidiaries. FBWS, TUS, ODUS, PSUS, ONUS, ECUS and FRUS may be referred to herein collectively as the “Military Utility Privatization Subsidiaries.”
GSWC is a public water utility engaged in the purchase, production, distribution and sale of water in 10 counties in the state of California.  GSWC is regulated by the California Public Utilities Commission (“CPUC”).  BVESI is a public electric utility that distributes electricity in several San Bernardino County mountain communities in California, and is also regulated by the CPUC. Additional information regarding public utility regulation is discussed in Item 7. "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition" and Results of Operation" under the section titled "Regulatory Matters."
AWR's regulated utilities served 262,770 water customers and 24,656 electric customers at December 31, 2021, or a total of 287,426 customers, compared with 261,796 water customers and 24,545 electric customers at December 31, 2020, or a total of 286,341 customers. Both GSWC’s and BVESI's operations exhibit seasonal trends. Although both have diversified customer bases, residential and commercial customers account for the majority of water and electric sales and revenues. Revenues derived from commercial and residential customers accounted for approximately 90% of total water and electric revenues for the years ended December 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019.
ASUS, itself or through the Military Utility Privatization Subsidiaries, has contracted with the U.S. government to provide water and/or wastewater services at various military installations. ASUS operates, maintains and performs construction activities (including renewal and replacement capital work) on water and/or wastewater systems at various U.S. military bases pursuant to 50-year firm, fixed-price contracts.  Each of the contracts with the U.S. government is subject to termination, in whole or in part, prior to the end of its 50-year term for convenience of the U.S. government or as a result of default or nonperformance by the ASUS subsidiary performing the contract. The price for each of these contracts is subject to annual economic price adjustments. Contracts are also subject to modifications for changes in circumstances, changes in laws and regulations, and additions to the contract value for new construction of facilities at the military bases.  AWR guarantees performance of ASUS’s military privatization contracts.
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Pursuant to the terms of the 50-year contracts with the U.S. government, the Military Utility Privatization Subsidiaries operate the following water and wastewater systems:
SubsidiaryMilitary BaseType of SystemLocation
FBWSFort BlissWater and WastewaterTexas and New Mexico
TUSJoint Base AndrewsWater and WastewaterMaryland
ODUSFort Lee WastewaterVirginia
ODUSJoint-Base Langley Eustis and Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort StoryWater and WastewaterVirginia
PSUSFort JacksonWater and WastewaterSouth Carolina
ONUSFort Bragg, Pope Army Airfield and Camp MackallWater and WastewaterNorth Carolina
ECUSEglin Air Force BaseWater and WastewaterFlorida
FRUSFort RileyWater and Wastewater Collection and TreatmentKansas
Certain financial information for each of AWR’s business segments - water distribution, electric distribution, and contracted services - is set forth in Note 17 to the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements of American States Water Company and its subsidiaries. While AWR’s water and electric utility segments are not dependent upon a single or only a few customers, the U.S. government is the primary customer for ASUS’s contracted services.  ASUS, from time to time, performs work at military bases for other prime contractors of the U.S. government. 
Seasonality
The demand for water and electricity varies by season. For instance, there can be a higher level of water consumption during the third quarter of each year when weather in California tends to be hot and dry. During unusually wet weather, our customers generally use less water. The CPUC has adopted regulatory mechanisms at GSWC that help mitigate fluctuations in revenues due to changes in water consumption by our customers in California, which currently remain in effect through the year 2024.
The demand for electricity in our electric customer service area is greatly affected by winter snow levels. An increase in winter snow levels reduces the use of snow making machines at ski resorts in the Big Bear area and, as a result, reduces our electric revenues. Likewise, unseasonably warm weather during a skiing season may result in temperatures too high for snow making conditions, which also reduces our electric revenues. The CPUC has also adopted regulatory mechanisms for our electric business, which helps mitigate fluctuations in the revenues of our electric business due to changes in the amount of electricity used by BVESI’s customers.
Environmental Regulation
AWR’s subsidiaries are subject to extensive environmental regulations. GSWC is required to comply with safe drinking water requirements, including testing to determine constituents in its water supply and customer notification requirements if certain contaminants exceed maximum levels or advisory levels, and requirements to address issues relating to known contamination. The subsidiaries of ASUS are subject to similar requirements in connection with their water and wastewater operations on military bases. GSWC is also responsible for clean-up and remediation at a plant site that contained an underground storage tank. As mandated by legislation enacted in California, BVESI is required to submit wildfire mitigation plans to the CPUC for approval. California requires all electric utilities to prepare plans on constructing, maintaining, and operating their electrical lines and equipment to minimize the risk of catastrophic wildfire.
ASUS’s subsidiaries are responsible for ensuring compliance with the reduction and/or removal of all constituents required under its wastewater treatment plant operating permits. ASUS works closely with state regulators and industry associations to stay current with emergent issues and proactively addresses any change in wastewater treatment regulation to ensure permit compliance.
The regulated utilities spent approximately $15.5 million in 2021 and expect to spend approximately $23.5 million in 2022 for capital expenditures on environmental control facilities. During 2021, ASUS performed construction activities (for the benefit of the U.S. government) related to environmental control facilities with a contract value of $3.4 million. ASUS expects to perform construction activities related to environmental control facilities with a contract value of $1.6 million in 2022. In addition, various other capital expenditures at the regulated utilities and construction projects at ASUS are incurred for purposes other than environmental control facilities, but may also have some environmental benefits. An environmental control facility is any facility that is reasonably expected to abate, reduce or aid in the prevention, measurement, control of monitoring of noise, air or water pollutants, solid waste, thermal pollution, radiation or other pollutants.
Environmental matters and compliance with such laws and regulations are discussed further in Item 7. “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation” under the section titled Environmental Matters.”
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Climate Change Planning, Risks and Opportunities
Climate change is one area that we focus on as we develop and execute our business strategy and financial planning, both in the short- and long-term and is subject to the oversight of the Board of Directors and senior management. First and foremost, designing and implementing efficient and resilient infrastructure and operational processes not only addresses climate change, but also reduces costs. Our capital investment programs are critical to ensure we can continue delivering reliable, high-quality water, wastewater and electric services without interruption. As a utility company, our operating strategy is dependent on having a reliable infrastructure in place.
The risks posed by climate variability increase the need for us to plan for and address supply resiliency. We address these risks by planning, assessing, mitigating, and investing in our infrastructure for the long-term benefit of our communities. As a provider of an essential product and service, our primary goal is to ensure service is uninterrupted.
GSWC considers the potential impacts of climate change in its water supply portfolio planning and its overall infrastructure replacement plans. We evaluate how water supplies, water quality and water demands may change, including mitigation strategies to ensure water continues to reach our customers.
We seek to minimize our greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to assist in reducing the effects of climate change. We studied our GHG emissions levels, set a 2020 baseline, and developed a GHG emissions reduction target of 60% by 2035 from the 2020 baseline. To accomplish this, Registrant has developed a phased approach, which includes short-, medium- and long-term actions. Our priorities include reductions in energy use and increasing purchases of green energy for our water operations, increasing purchases of green energy for distribution to our electric customers, and reviewing our vehicle fleet needs and electrification. Achievement of this reduction target is contingent on certain external factors, which include the ongoing development of technology, and successful achievement by the state of California in reaching its Renewables Portfolio Standard goal for this period.
Water Utility
There are risks to maintaining adequate water quality and/or supply, either from climate variability or other events. They include droughts, changes in weather patterns, natural disasters, wildfires, decisions or actions restricting the use of water from our sources, and/or pumping of groundwater, and contamination or acts of terrorism or vandalism. We include these potential events in our strategic planning process as we aim to avoid service interruptions and compromised water quality.
Our goal is to maintain adequate and high-quality water supplies. We do this in a number of ways, including monitoring water levels, short- and long-term water supply planning, having a diverse water supply portfolio, developing contingency plans, water efficiency and conservation efforts, and maintaining a strong infrastructure. Additional information on GSWC’s water supplies is discussed further in Item 7. “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation” under the section titled Water Supplies.”
Electric Utility
Climate change has also impacted electric utilities in California due to an increase in wildfires. BVESI's compliance with its wildfire mitigation plans have resulted in an increase in capital expenditures for wildfire mitigation projects. BVESI will not be able to recover the costs incurred to make capital improvements included in BVESI’s current wildfire mitigation plans from ratepayers until the CPUC approves recovery of these costs in its next general rate case filing, which is scheduled to be filed in 2022 to set new rates beginning in 2023. Power supplies may also become more constrained and more expensive due to regulation of power plants using fossil fuels.
California has established a cap-and-trade program applicable to greenhouse gas emissions. While BVESI’s power-plant emissions are below the reporting threshold, as a “Covered Entity” BVESI has an obligation to file a report with the California Air Resources Board (CARB) in June of each year under the Greenhouse Gas Mandatory Reporting Regulation. The report will become available publicly in the last quarter of 2022.
The State of California and the CPUC have established renewable energy procurement targets. BVESI has entered into a CPUC-approved ten-year contract for renewable energy credits. Because of this agreement, BVESI believes it will comply through at least 2023 with California’s renewable energy statutes that address this issue.
In 2021, BVESI’s renewable power represented 35.8% of total electric supply purchases. Renewable Energy Procurement requirements continue to escalate, reaching 50% by 2026 and 100% carbon free by 2045. BVESI anticipates filing an application with the CPUC to construct a solar generation facility in the near future. If approved and constructed, the project will provide a clean, local energy solution for the service territory.
BVESI offers a Distributed Generation Program, which benefits customers who install a solar or wind-generating facility that produces renewable energy. Those customers can receive a bill credit if their monthly renewable energy production exceeds their on-site use. BVESI also has a number of customers on its Net Energy Metering Program (NEM), which was the previous renewable energy program. NEM customers can receive a bill credit if their annual renewable energy production
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exceeds their on-site use. Approximately 5% of the energy consumed by our BVESI customers is now generated by customer-owned renewable sources (solar).
BVESI is also required to comply with the CPUC’s greenhouse gas emission performance standards. Under these standards, BVESI must file an annual attestation with the CPUC stating that BVESI has no new ownership investment in generation facilities exceeding the emission performance standards and no long-term commitments for generation exceeding the standards. In February 2022, BVESI filed an attestation that BVESI complied with the standards for 2021. At this time, management cannot estimate the impact, if any, that these regulations may have on future costs over BVESI’s power plant operations or the cost of BVESI’s purchased power from third party providers.
COVID-19
GSWC, BVESI and ASUS have continued their operations throughout the COVID-19 pandemic given that their water, wastewater and electric utility services are deemed essential. AWR's responses take into account orders issued by the CPUC, and the guidance provided by federal, state, and local health authorities and other government officials for the COVID-19 pandemic.
Some of the actions taken by GSWC and BVESI included suspending service disconnections for nonpayment pursuant to CPUC and state orders, and telecommuting by employees. The suspension of water-service disconnections at GSWC were implemented in response to an executive order from the governor of California, as well as CPUC orders. Pursuant to a CPUC July 2021 decision, the moratorium on water-service disconnections due to non-payment of past-due amounts billed to residential customers expired on February 1, 2022. However, water service cannot be disconnected so long as customers make timely payments on current bills, and are provided and adhere to payment plans to pay down past-due bills resulting from the pandemic. The moratorium on electric customer service disconnections ended on September 30, 2021. However, electric-service disconnections for non-payment can only be done after taking into account other matters, such as average daily temperatures under certain conditions.
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused significant volatility in financial markets. The continued economic impact could adversely impact the value of GSWC’s pension and other retirement plan assets due to possible declines in security prices.
The COVID-19 pandemic has placed a strain on supply chains to sufficiently meet demand of the materials and supplies necessary to complete some capital expenditure projects at our regulated utilities, as well as some construction projects at our contracted services segment. While we may purchase materials and supplies upfront when appropriate, there can be no assurance that our efforts will prevent delays or disruptions to our capital investments or construction projects. Furthermore, Registrant has experienced increased costs due to the impacts of inflation. The regulated utilities may update their costs as part of general rate case proceedings, and ASUS may update prices annually through economic price adjustments. However, until we receive increased funding to offset higher costs, our liquidity may be negatively impacted.
Additional information regarding the impact of COVID-19 on GSWC and BVESI is provided in Item 7. “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation” under the section titled COVID-19.
Competition
The businesses of GSWC and BVESI are substantially free from direct and indirect competition with other public utilities, municipalities and other public agencies within their existing service territories.  However, GSWC and BVESI may be subject to eminent domain proceedings in which governmental agencies, under state law, may acquire GSWC’s water systems or BVESI's electric system if doing so is necessary and in the public’s interest. GSWC competes with governmental agencies and other investor-owned utilities in connection with offering service to new real estate developments on the basis of financial terms, availability of water and ability to commence providing service on a timely basis. ASUS actively competes for business with other investor-owned utilities, other third-party providers of water and/or wastewater services, and governmental entities primarily on the basis of quality of service and price.
AWR Workforce
AWR and its subsidiaries had a total of 808 employees as of December 31, 2021.  GSWC had 500 employees as of December 31, 2021. BVESI had 46 employees, eighteen of which are covered by a collective bargaining agreement with the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, which expires in December 2025. All of the employees of GSWC and BVESI are located in California. At times, GSWC and BVESI use temporary and contract workers for a finite period of time and in a limited capacity to continue a project or workflow until they can hire a permanent employee. It is also common for those temporary workers to be hired on as a regular, full-time employee.
ASUS and its subsidiaries had a total of 262 employees as of December 31, 2021. Thirteen of FBWS's employees are covered by a collective bargaining agreement with the International Union of Operating Engineers. This agreement expires in September 2022.
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Our businesses requires a combination of complex infrastructure, regulatory expertise and customer service. Ongoing development of our talent across the organization to meet critical business needs is a continual focus, and includes (i) building a culture such that high-potential talent is identified and further developed, (ii) creating career paths that not only move up a specialized ladder, but across the organization, and (iii) offering opportunities for employees to accept new challenges through stretch assignments.
Attracting Diverse Candidates
We understand that strength comes from having a diverse employee population. We strive to hire from our local communities and have a workforce that is representative, at all job levels, of the communities we serve. This begins with the recruitment process. We strive to have all aspects of employment, including the decision to hire, promote, discipline, or discharge, be based on merit, competence, performance, and business needs. It is our policy not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, marital status, age, national origin, ancestry, physical or mental disability, medical condition, pregnancy, genetic information, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, veteran status, or any other status protected under federal, state, or local laws.
Compensation and Benefits
We pay employees a competitive and fair wage, as benchmarked with other leading companies and the market. Consistent with our principle of valuing personal mastery, we reward employees for improving their skills and capabilities. Our benefits include a defined benefit pension plan for employees hired prior to January 1, 2011, a defined contribution plan for hires or rehires after December 31, 2010, a 401(k) plan, healthcare and insurance benefits, health savings and flexible spending accounts.
Safety and Training
Strong Occupational Health and Safety practices reduce injuries, keep our workforce healthy, and reduce operating costs. A safe workforce translates into better performance company-wide. We work to create a safety-focused culture in which each individual feels personally responsible for their own safety, the safety of their co-workers, as well as the safety of the communities they serve. Safety performance is included as a metric in the officer and manager compensation programs. Employees attend training in various mandated safety programs that are applicable to their operations. In addition, there are regulatory safety training requirements as well as training requirements for the Department of Transportation and training requirements for compliance with local, state, and federal environmental laws.
To reinforce our safety efforts and protocols, company-wide safety inspections at GSWC and BVESI are conducted with supervisors. The inspection reports are forwarded to management for review, allocation of resources are made (if needed), and corrective actions are taken. ASUS has a dedicated Safety Coordinator located at each military base installation served. The onsite Safety Coordinator is responsible for regulatory compliance, as well as beneficial health and safety monitoring functions.
Learning and Development
Compliance training is required each year, for each employee. Other types of training are offered on an optional basis. Examples of optional programs include ongoing water operations competencies and education, supervisor development, knowledge capture and management, feedback and measurements to show the value of learning solutions, and administrative oversight for various business competencies relative to mandated training and compliance requirements. We pay for approved external business-related seminars and workshops. Certain positions require employees to maintain all of their job-specific certifications, licenses and continuing education credits.
On a regular and ongoing basis, we require all employees to certify that they have reviewed and understand our Code of Conduct as well as our Employee Handbook. We provide harassment and prevention awareness training for all employees.
Succession Planning
On an annual basis, our senior management team completes a roadmap for improving human capital management by developing succession plans with the goal of achieving the most efficient alignment of resources and talent to meet business needs. This includes identifying key succession positions and potential successors for top-level positions, such as Vice Presidents, for the next ten years.
Recruiting, developing and retaining the right talent is key to our long-term success. With 28% of our employees eligible for retirement in the next five years, we are focused on transferring institutional knowledge, continue succession planning and pursue recruitment and development strategies to attract qualified talent.
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Cybersecurity
Cyberattacks represent an increasing threat to water, wastewater and electric utility systems and thereby the safety and security of our communities. There have also been increasing threats to the information that companies maintain that have resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of private customer, employee, director and corporate financial information.
We have increased our investments in information technology to monitor and address these threats and attempted cyber-attacks, and to improve our posture in addressing security vulnerabilities. We have adopted multi-layered safeguards and educational measures to protect our operations, assets and digital information. Cybersecurity updates are given to the Board of Directors on a quarterly basis. Quarterly cybersecurity training is required for all employees, with the topics varying each quarter. We also conduct specialized training for employees annually on protecting certain types of information relating to the work we do with the U.S. government. While we have increased our investments in information technology to address security vulnerabilities, there can be no assurance that these measures and our efforts will prevent a cyber-attack.
Forward-Looking Information
This Form 10-K and the documents incorporated herein contain forward-looking statements intended to qualify for the “safe harbor” from liability established by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements are based on current estimates, expectations and projections about future events and assumptions regarding these events and include statements regarding management’s goals, beliefs, plans or current expectations, taking into account the information currently available to management. Forward-looking statements are not statements of historical facts. For example, when we use words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “plan,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “may” and other words that convey uncertainty of future events or outcomes, we are making forward-looking statements. We are not able to predict all the factors that may affect future results. We caution you that any forward-looking statements made by us are not guarantees of future performance and the actual results may differ materially from those in our forward-looking statements. Some of the factors that could cause future results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by our forward-looking statements or from historical results, are described in the following section.
Item 1A. Risk Factors
You should carefully read the risks described below and other information in this Form 10-K in order to understand certain of the risks of our business.
Overview of Risk Factors
We have three business segments, water utility, electric utility and contracted services, each of which are subject to different risks as further discussed below. We are also subject to risks frequently encountered by businesses of our size.
Regulated Water and Electric Utility Operations
GSWC’s and BVESI’s revenues depend substantially on the rates and charges we are permitted to recover from our customers and the timing of that recovery as authorized by the CPUC. Decisions of the CPUC could also result in impairment charges and customer refunds, and delays in recovering costs in rates. Some of the factors impacting our ability to obtain rate recovery on a timely basis include opposition to rate increases arising out of increased costs for replacing aging infrastructure and increased costs associated with addressing climate change risks, such as drought and wildfires in California, costs incurred in connection with complying with water quality regulations, costs incurred in connection with complying with the COVID-19 pandemic, and costs incurred in connection with obtaining and complying with franchise agreements with local governmental agencies and costs of obtaining permits from local, state and federal governmental agencies. There may also be increased customer opposition to rate increases due to customer dissatisfaction with conservation rate structures, public safety power shutdowns and the closure of some customer service offices due to COVID-19 governmental shut-down orders.
Our water and electric utility services are provided in California. As a result, our financial results are largely subject to political, water supply, labor, utility cost and regulatory risks, economic conditions, natural disasters (which may increase as a result of climate change), and other risks affecting California businesses. Our assets are also subject to condemnation in California.
Contract Services Operations
All of our utility privatization contract services are provided to the U.S. government pursuant to the terms of 50-year firm, fixed-price contracts subject to annual economic price adjustments. These contracts may be terminated or services suspended at any time for convenience of the government. We are subject to penalties for failure to conform or comply with U.S. government regulations and the terms of our contracts, and may be suspended or debarred for such failure to comply. The fees that we may charge are adjusted annually and in response to our requests for equitable adjustments. We have experienced delays in obtaining price and equitable adjustments, as well as delays in being paid by the U.S. government.
We are also responsible for complying with water quality and wastewater quality regulations on military bases.
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We compete with other companies in bidding on providing utility services on military bases. We submit bids on new U.S. government contracts for military bases based on estimates of cost and potential profit. Our estimates and judgment are important, for in the event we overpay to obtain a contract, we could incur losses on it.
Other Business Risks
We may be subject to financial losses, penalties and other liabilities if we fail to operate and maintain safe work sites, equipment and facilities, including losses, damages, penalties and other liabilities arising from wildfires, other natural disasters and terrorist activities. We may not be able to recover all these losses from insurance or from ratepayers or may experience delays in obtaining recovery for these losses.
We are also subject to other business risks typical of our business, including:
Security risks, data protection and cyber-attacks that could disrupt our operations, increase our expenses, result in liabilities to third parties and damage to our reputation;
Failure to attract, train, develop and transition key employees with the necessary skills to replace employees who are retiring or otherwise terminate employment or to fill new positions needed to respond to the increase in public utility and environmental regulations;
Failure to make accurate estimates about financing and accounting matters, and in filing requests for rate increases with the CPUC or requests for price adjustments with the U.S. government or in bids on military privatization contracts;
Our ability to finance the significant capital expenditures required by our businesses, which could be adversely impacted by general economic and market conditions;
Changes in accounting, public utility, environmental and tax laws and regulations impacting our business;
Our inability to comply with debt covenants in our debt agreements, and
Final determination of our income tax liability by the federal and applicable state governments.
As a holding company, AWR is dependent upon dividends from its subsidiaries to pay dividends to its shareholders. The ability of its subsidiaries to pay dividends is dependent upon compliance with state laws governing the payment of dividends and the terms of the debt agreements with the applicable subsidiary.
Climate Change
Climate change has resulted in increased frequency and duration of droughts, potential degradation of water quality, and changes in demand for services. More frequent and extended California drought conditions may cause increased stress on surface water supplies and groundwater basins, as well as allocations of water from the State Water Project and the Colorado River. Wholesale water suppliers may not have adequate supply during extended periods of drought, which may result in increases in prices for water delivered to us. In addition, GSWC could experience an increased use of reclaimed or recycled water by GSWC customers, in lieu of GSWC supplying potable water to these customers. Reclaimed water generally has lower tariff rates than potable water. Prolonged droughts may also result in state-ordered mandatory or voluntary conservation efforts by customers, changes in customer conservation patterns and imposition of new regulations impacting such things as landscaping and irrigation patterns.
These drought conditions have contributed to increases in wildfires, which has resulted in new California legislation requiring electric utilities to adopt and implement wildfire safety and mitigation plans. BVESI is incurring increased capital expenditures related to the creation and implementation of these plans. We anticipate that the costs of capital improvements necessary to implement this program will continue to increase. BVESI is also required to implement a public safety power shut-off program during high wildfire threat conditions. Shut-offs can reduce BVESI's liquidity and decrease customer satisfaction. Abnormal weather patterns created by climate change can also impact electricity demand at BVESI. The demand for electricity at our electric segment is greatly affected by winter snow levels. An increase in winter snow levels reduces the use of snow making machines at ski resorts in the Big Bear area and, as a result, reduces our electric revenues. Likewise, unseasonably warm weather during a skiing season may result in temperatures too high for snow making conditions, which also reduces our liquidity. Furthermore, potential future legislation efforts to ban gas powered power plants as a response to climate change may require us to replace our current 8.4 MW natural gas powered generator before its useful life is completed.

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Risks Associated with Regulated Public Utility and Contracted Services Operations
Our businesses are heavily regulated and, as a result, decisions by regulatory agencies or the U.S. government can significantly affect our businesses
GSWC's and BVESI's revenues depend substantially on the rates and fees they charge their customers and their ability to recover costs on a timely basis as authorized by the CPUC, including the ability to recover the costs of purchased water, groundwater assessments, electricity, natural gas, chemicals, water treatment, security at water facilities and preventative maintenance and emergency repairs. Any delays by the CPUC in granting rate relief to cover increased operating and capital costs at our public utilities or delays in obtaining approval of our requests at ASUS for economic price or equitable adjustments for contracted services from the U.S. government may adversely affect our financial performance. We may file for interim rates in California in situations where there may be delays in granting final rate relief during a general rate case proceeding. If the CPUC approves lower rates, the CPUC will require us to refund to customers the difference between the interim rates and the rates approved by the CPUC. Similarly, if the CPUC approves rates that are higher than the interim rates, the CPUC may authorize us to recover the difference between the interim rates and the final rates.
Regulatory decisions affecting GSWC and/or BVESI may also impact prospective revenues and earnings, affect the timing of the recognition of revenues and expenses, may overturn past decisions used in determining our revenues and expenses, and could result in impairment charges and customer refunds. On August 27, 2020, the CPUC issued a final decision in the first phase of the CPUC’s Order Instituting Rulemaking evaluating the low income ratepayer assistance and affordability objectives contained in the CPUC’s 2010 Water Action Plan, which also addressed the continued use of the Water Revenue Adjustment Mechanism ("WRAM") and the Modified Cost Balancing Account ("MCBA") by California water utilities. Based on the final decision, any general rate case application filed by GSWC and the other California water utilities after the August 27, 2020 effective date of this decision, may not include a proposal to continue the use of the WRAM or MCBA, but may instead include a proposal to use a limited price adjustment mechanism (the Monterey-Style WRAM) and an incremental supply cost balancing account. GSWC's next water general rate case application will be filed in 2023 to establish new rates for the years 2025 – 2027. GSWC is permitted to keep the use of the WRAM and MCBA through the year 2024. GSWC and other California water utilities have requested review of this decision by the California Supreme Court.
Management continually evaluates the anticipated recovery of regulatory assets, settlement of liabilities and revenues subject to refund and provides for allowances and reserves as deemed necessary. In the event that our assessment of the probability of recovery or settlement through the ratemaking process is incorrect, we will adjust the associated regulatory asset or liability to reflect the change in our assessment or any regulatory disallowances. A change in our evaluation of the probability over the recovery of regulatory assets including a future disallowance of previously granted regulatory mechanisms, or a regulatory disallowance of all or a portion of our costs could have a material adverse effect on our financial results.
We are also, in some cases, required to estimate future expenses and, in others, we are required to incur the expense before recovering costs. As a result, our revenues and earnings may fluctuate depending on the accuracy of our estimates, the timing of our investments or expenses or other factors. If expenses increase significantly over a short period, we may experience delays in recovery of these expenses, the inability to recover carrying costs for these expenses, and increased risks of regulatory disallowances or write-offs.
Changes in laws, regulations and policies of regulatory agencies can significantly affect our business
Regulatory agencies may also change their rules and policies, which may adversely affect our profitability and cash flows. Changes in policies of the U.S. government may also adversely affect one or more of our Military Utility Privatization Subsidiaries. In certain circumstances, the U.S. government may be unwilling or unable to appropriate funds to pay costs mandated by changes in rules and policies of federal or state regulatory agencies. The U.S. government may disagree with the increases that we request and may delay approval of requests for equitable adjustment or economic price adjustments, which could adversely affect our anticipated rates of return at our contracted services business.
We may also be subject to fines or penalties if a regulatory agency or the U.S. government determine that we have failed to comply with laws, regulations or orders applicable to our businesses, unless we successfully appeal such an adverse determination. Regulatory agencies may also disallow recovery of certain costs if they determine they may no longer be recovered in rates, or if audit findings determine that we have failed to comply with our policies and procedures for procurement or other practices.
Our liquidity and earnings may be adversely affected by maintenance costs
Some of our infrastructure in California is aging. We have experienced leaks and mechanical problems in some of these older systems. In addition, well and pump maintenance expenses are affected by labor and material costs and more stringent environmental regulations. Our electrical systems have also required upgrades due to aging and new wildfire safety and other compliance requirements. While we spend significant amounts on maintenance each year, these costs can increase substantially and unexpectedly.
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We include estimated increases in maintenance costs for future years in each water and electric general rate case filed by GSWC and BVESI, respectively, for possible recovery. To the extent that these estimates understate our actual costs, we may be unable to recover all maintenance costs in rates.
Our assets at our regulated utilities are subject to condemnation
Municipalities and other governmental subdivisions may, in certain circumstances, seek to acquire certain of our assets through eminent domain proceedings. It is generally our practice to contest these proceedings, which may be costly and may temporarily divert the attention of management from the operation of our business. If a municipality or other governmental subdivision succeeds in acquiring our assets, there is a risk that we will not receive adequate compensation for the assets taken or be able to recover all charges associated with the condemnation of such assets. In addition, we would no longer be entitled to any portion of the revenues generated from the use of such assets.
Our costs of obtaining and complying with the terms of franchise agreements are increasing
Cities and counties in which GSWC and BVESI operate have granted them franchises to construct, maintain and use pipes, wires and appurtenances in or along public streets and rights of way. The costs of obtaining, renewing and complying with the terms of these franchise agreements have been increasing as cities and counties attempt to regulate our operations within the boundaries of the city or unincorporated areas of the counties in which we operate. Our regulated utilities may also be required from time to time to relocate existing infrastructure in order to accommodate local infrastructure improvement projects. Cities and counties have also been imposing new fees on our operations, including pipeline abandonment fees and road-cut or other types of capital improvement fees. At the same time, there is increasing opposition from consumer groups to rate increases that may be necessary to compensate GSWC and BVESI for the increased costs of regulation by local governments. These trends may adversely affect our ability to recover in rates the costs of providing water and electric services and to efficiently manage capital expenditures and operating and maintenance expenses within CPUC-authorized levels.
We have also experienced instances of increased costs and delays in obtaining permits that we need in order to install, maintain, repair, and replace some of our aging water and electric utility infrastructure and upgrades needed to comply with changes in laws and regulations or otherwise necessary to harden our infrastructure as a result of drought, wildfires and increases in the frequency and duration of more extreme weather events due to climate change.
Adverse publicity and reputational risks can lead to increased regulatory oversight or sanctions
As a utility company, we have a large customer base and are therefore, subject to public criticism regarding, among other things, the quality and reliability of our water and electricity services, and the accuracy, timeliness and format of bills that are provided to our customers for such services. Adverse publicity and negative customer sentiment may cause regulatory authorities, including the CPUC, and other governing bodies to view us unfavorably and cause us to be susceptible to increased oversight and more stringent regulations and economic requirements.
Risks Associated with Health, Safety and Liability Matters
The outbreak of COVID-19 and its impact on business and economic conditions could negatively affect our financial condition.
The COVID-19 outbreak, the resulting pandemic, and the impact on the economy and financial markets could adversely affect the Company’s financial condition. We have continued our operations given that water, wastewater, and electric utility services are deemed essential, and have implemented health and safety measures such as implementing worker-distancing measures and using a remote workforce where possible. However, there is no assurance that the continued spread of COVID-19 and efforts to contain the virus (including, but not limited to, voluntary and mandatory quarantines, restrictions on travel, limiting gatherings of people, and reduced operations and extended closures of many businesses) will not materially impact our financial condition. In particular, the continued spread of COVID-19 and efforts to contain the virus could:
reduce the availability and productivity of our employees;
have an adverse impact on our business activities due to the ongoing shortage of skilled trade labor as well as engineering and professional staff;
cause us to experience an increase in costs as a result of our emergency measures, delayed payments from our customers and uncollectible accounts as a result of the impact on our customers' ability to pay bills due to voluntary and mandatory stay-at-home orders;
impact our liquidity position and cost of and ability to access funds from financial institutions and capital markets;
cause delays in capital expenditures activity due to, among other things, delays in obtaining permits from local governments or local mandated restrictions on shutting off service as part of the response to the pandemic;
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have an adverse impact on the value of our pension and retirement assets;
increase customer dissatisfaction due to an increase in customer wait times resulting from a rise in customer calls, and general anxiety due to personal circumstances arising from the pandemic; and
cause our contractors, suppliers and other business partners to be unable to fulfill their contractual obligations in the ordinary course of business or otherwise disrupt our supply chain.
The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted supply chains, with restrictions and limitations on business activities and impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic causing labor shortages, capacity constraints, disruptions and delays. These issues may place a strain on supply chains to sufficiently meet demand of the materials and supplies necessary to complete capital expenditure projects at our regulated utilities, or construction projects at our contracted services segment. While we may purchase materials and supplies upfront when appropriate, there can be no assurance that our efforts will prevent delays or disruptions to our capital investments or construction projects.
Additionally, current supply chain challenges are driving price increases for materials commonly used for construction projects. Combined with raising labor costs, the current inflationary market is leading to an increase in total cost for our capital expenditure projects. Our regulated utilities update costs as part of general rate case proceedings, and ASUS updates prices annually through economic price adjustments. However, until we receive increased funding to offset higher costs, our liquidity may be negatively impacted.
The CPUC has authorized GSWC and BVESI to track incremental costs, including bad debt expense in excess of what is included in their respective revenue requirements, incurred as a result of the pandemic in COVID-19-related memorandum accounts to be filed with the CPUC for future recovery.
Our liquidity and earnings may be adversely affected by wildfires
It is possible that wildfires may occur more frequently, be of longer duration or impact larger areas as a result of drought-damaged plants and trees, lower humidity or higher winds that may occur as result of changing weather patterns. Our liquidity, earnings and operations may be materially adversely affected by wildfires. We may be required to (i) incur greater costs to relocate lines or increase our trimming of trees and other plants near our electric facilities to avoid wildfires, (ii) make significant additional capital expenditures to fund the projects in BVESI's wildfire and safety mitigation plans, and (iii) bear the costs of damages to property or injuries to the public if it is determined that our power lines or other electrical equipment was a cause of such damages or injuries. In addition, wildfires may result in reduced demand if structures are destroyed or unusable following a wildfire, and may adversely affect our ability to provide water or electric service in our service areas due to public safety power shutdowns or any of our water or electric utility infrastructure is damaged by a wildfire.
Losses by insurance companies resulting from wildfires in California have caused insurance coverage for wildfire risks to become more expensive and coverage could become unavailable on reasonable terms, and our insurance may be inadequate to recover all our losses incurred in a wildfire. We might not be allowed to recover in our rates any increased costs of wildfire insurance or the costs of any uninsured wildfire losses.
Electric utilities in California are authorized to shut off power for public safety reasons, such as during periods of extreme fire hazard, if the utility reasonably believes that there is an imminent and significant risk that strong winds may topple power lines or cause vegetation to come into contact with power lines leading to increased risk of fire. Shut-offs can reduce BVESI's liquidity and decrease customer satisfaction.
These shut-offs can also adversely affect GSWC’s water utility operations if the electric utilities that provide electric service to GSWC’s water operations shut off power lines that deliver electricity to GSWC’s water plant and equipment, thereby adversely affecting its ability to provide water service to its customers.
We may be held strictly liable for damages to property caused by our equipment even if we are not negligent  
Utilities in California may be held strictly liable for damages caused by their property, such as mains, fire hydrants, power lines and other equipment, even though they were not negligent in the operation and maintenance of that property, under a doctrine known as inverse condemnation. Our liquidity, earnings and operations may be adversely affected if we are unable to recover the costs of paying claims for damages caused by the non-negligent operation and maintenance of our property from customers or through insurance.
We may be subject to financial losses, penalties and other liabilities if we fail to maintain safe work sites, equipment or facilities
Our safety record is critical to our reputation. We maintain health and safety standards to protect our employees, customers, vendors and the public. Although we aim to comply with such health and safety standards, it is unlikely that we will be able to avoid all accidents or other events resulting in damage to property or the public.
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Our business sites, including construction and maintenance sites, often put our employees and others in close proximity with large pieces of equipment, moving vehicles, pressurized water, chemicals and other regulated materials. On many sites, we are responsible for safety and, accordingly, must implement safety procedures. If we fail in any respect to implement such procedures or if the procedures we implement are ineffective or are not followed by our employees or others, our employees and others may be injured or die. Unsafe work sites also have the potential to increase our operating costs. Any of the foregoing could result in financial losses, which could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
Our operations involve the handling and storage of hazardous chemicals that, if improperly handled, stored or disposed of, could subject us to penalties or other liabilities. We are also subject to regulations dealing with occupational health and safety. Although we maintain functional employee groups whose primary purpose is to ensure that we implement effective health, safety, and environmental work procedures throughout our organization, including construction sites and maintenance sites, a failure to comply with such regulations in any respect could subject us to liability.
The generation, transmission and distribution of electricity are dangerous and involve inherent risks of damage to private property and injury to employees and the general public
Electricity is dangerous for employees and the general public should they come in contact with electrical current or equipment, including through downed power lines, sparking during high-wind events or equipment malfunctions. Injuries and property damage caused by such events may subject BVESI to significant liabilities that may not be covered or fully covered by insurance. Additionally, the CPUC has delegated to its staff the authority to issue citations, which carry a fine of $50,000 per-violation per day, to electric utilities subject to its jurisdiction for violations of safety rules found in statutes, regulations, and the General Orders of the CPUC.
We may sustain losses that exceed or are excluded from our insurance coverage or for which we are not insured
We are, from time to time, parties to legal or regulatory proceedings.  These proceedings may pertain to regulatory investigations, employment matters or other disputes.  Management periodically reviews its assessment of the probable outcome of these proceedings, the costs and expenses reasonably expected to be incurred, and the availability and extent of insurance coverage. On the basis of this review, management establishes reserves for such matters.  We may, however, from time to time be required to pay fines, penalties or damages that exceed our insurance coverage and/or reserves if our estimate of the probable outcome of such proceedings proves to be inaccurate. 
We maintain insurance coverage as part of our overall legal and risk management strategy to minimize our potential liabilities.  Generally, our insurance policies cover property, workers' compensation, general liability, automobile liability, and other risks. Insurance coverage may not cover certain claims involving punitive damages. Each policy includes deductibles or self-insured retentions and policy limits for covered claims.  Our insurance policies also contain exclusions and other limitations that may not cover our potential liabilities. Furthermore, due to insurance market conditions resulting in tighter underwriting and increased premiums along with reductions in capacity, we have experienced increased costs and difficulties in obtaining certain insurance coverages, particularly along the general liability, umbrella and cyber insurance lines. We may experience further increased insurance costs and/or coverage reductions in future years. As a result, we may sustain losses that exceed or that are excluded from our insurance coverage or for which we are not insured.
Uninsured losses and increases in the cost of insurance may not be recoverable or fully recoverable in customer rates. A loss which is not insured or not fully insured or cannot be recovered in customer rates could materially affect our financial condition and results of operations.
We operate in areas subject to natural disasters
We operate in areas that are prone to earthquakes, fires, mudslides, hurricanes, tornadoes, flooding or other natural disasters.  While we maintain insurance policies to help reduce our financial exposure, a significant seismic event in southern California, where our regulated water and electric operations are concentrated, wildfires or other natural disasters in any of the areas that we serve could adversely impact our ability to deliver water and electricity or provide wastewater service, and adversely affect our costs of operations.  With respect to GSWC and BVESI, the CPUC has historically allowed utilities to establish a catastrophic event memorandum account to potentially recover such incremental costs not covered in rates. With respect to the Military Utility Privatization Subsidiaries, costs associated with responding to natural disasters have been recoverable through requests for equitable adjustment.
Our operations may be the target of terrorist activities
Terrorists could seek to disrupt service to our customers by targeting our assets.  We have invested in additional security for facilities throughout our regulated service areas to mitigate the risks of terrorist activities. We also may be prevented from providing water and/or wastewater services at the military bases we serve in times of military crisis affecting these bases.
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Water Quality Regulatory Risks
Our costs involved in maintaining water quality and complying with environmental regulation have increased and are expected to continue to increase
Our capital and operating costs at GSWC may increase substantially as a result of increases in environmental regulation arising from increases in the cost of upgrading and building new water treatment plants, disposing of residuals from our water treatment plants, handling and storing hazardous chemicals, compliance-monitoring activities and securing alternative supplies when necessary.  GSWC may be able to recover these costs from customers through the ratemaking process. We may also be able to recover these costs from certain third parties under settlement and contractual arrangements. Our capital and operating costs may also increase as a result of changes in laboratory detection capabilities and drinking water notification and response levels for certain substances, such as perfluoroalkyl substances (“PFAS”) used to make certain fabrics and other materials, certain fire suppression agents and used in various industrial processes.
Our operating costs may increase as a result of groundwater contamination
Our operations can be impacted by groundwater contamination in certain service territories.  Historically, we have taken a number of steps to address contamination, including the removal of wells from service, decreasing the amount of groundwater pumped from wells in order to facilitate remediation of plumes of contaminated water, constructing water treatment facilities and securing alternative sources of supply from other areas not affected by the contamination.  In emergency situations, we have supplied our customers with bottled water until the emergency situation has been resolved.
Our ability to recover these types of costs depends upon a variety of factors, including approval of rate increases, the willingness of potentially responsible parties to settle litigation and otherwise address the contamination, and the extent and magnitude of the contamination. We may recover costs from certain third parties that may be responsible, or potentially responsible, for groundwater contamination. However, we often experience delays in obtaining recovery of these costs and incur additional costs associated with seeking recovery from responsible or potentially responsible parties, which may adversely impact our liquidity. In some events, we may be unable to recover all of these costs from third parties due to the inability to identify the potentially responsible parties, the lack of financial resources of responsible parties or the high litigation costs associated with obtaining recovery from responsible or potentially responsible parties.
We can give no assurance regarding the adequacy of any such recovery to offset the costs associated with contamination or the cost of recovery of any legal costs. To date, the CPUC has permitted us to establish memorandum accounts for potential recovery of these types of costs when they have arisen.  
Management believes that rate recovery, proper insurance coverage and reserves are in place to appropriately manage these types of contamination issues.  However, such issues, if ultimately resolved unfavorably to us, could, in the aggregate, have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. 
Water Supply Risks
The adequacy of our water supplies depends upon weather and a variety of other uncontrollable factors
The adequacy of our water supplies varies from year to year depending upon a variety of factors, including:
rainfall, basin replenishment, flood control, snow pack levels in California and the West, reservoir levels and availability of reservoir storage;
availability of Colorado River water and imported water from the State Water Project;
the amount of usable water stored in reservoirs and groundwater basins;
the amount of water used by our customers and others;
water quality;
legal limitations on production, diversion, storage, conveyance and use; and
climate change.
More frequent and extended California drought conditions and changes in weather patterns cause increased stress on surface water supplies and groundwater basins. In addition, low or no allocations of water from the State Water Project and court-ordered pumping restrictions on water obtained from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta decrease or eliminate the amount of water that the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California ("MWD") and other state water contractors are able to import from northern California.
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We have implemented tiered rates and other practices, as appropriate, in order to encourage water conservation. We have also implemented programs to assist customers in complying with water usage reductions. Over the long term, we are acting to secure additional supplies, which may include supplies from desalination and increased use of reclaimed water, where appropriate and feasible. We cannot predict the extent to which these efforts to reduce stress on our water supplies will be successful or sustainable, or the extent to which these efforts will enable us to continue to satisfy all of the water needs of our customers. Water shortages at GSWC may:
adversely affect our supply mix, for instance, by causing increased reliance upon more expensive water sources;
adversely affect our operating costs, for instance, by increasing the cost of producing water from more highly contaminated aquifers or requiring us to transport water over longer distances, truck water to water systems or adopt other emergency measures to enable us to continue to provide water service to our customers;
result in an increase in our capital expenditures over the long term, for example, by requiring future construction of pipelines to connect to alternative sources of supply, new wells to replace those that are no longer in service or are otherwise inadequate to meet the needs of our customers, and other facilities to conserve or reclaim water;
adversely affect the volume of water sold as a result of such factors as mandatory or voluntary conservation efforts by customers, changes in customer conservation patterns, recycling of water by customers and imposition of new regulations impacting such things as landscaping and irrigation patterns;
adversely affect aesthetic water quality if we are unable to flush our water systems as frequently due to water shortages or drought restrictions; and
result in customer dissatisfaction and harm to our reputation if water service is reduced, interrupted or otherwise adversely affected as a result of drought, water contamination or other causes.
Our liquidity may be adversely affected by changes in water supply costs
We obtain our water supplies for GSWC from a variety of sources, which vary among our water systems. Certain systems obtain all of their supply from water that is pumped from aquifers within our service areas; some systems purchase all of their supply from wholesale suppliers; some systems obtain their supply from treating surface water sources; and other systems obtain their supply from a combination of wells, surface water sources and/or wholesale suppliers. The cost of obtaining these supplies varies, and overall costs can be impacted as use within a system varies from time to time. As a result, our cost of providing, distributing and treating water for our customers’ use can vary significantly.
Furthermore, imported water wholesalers, such as MWD, may not always have an adequate supply of water to sell to us. Wholesale water suppliers may increase their prices for water delivered to us based on factors that affect their operating costs. Purchased water rate increases are beyond our control.
GSWC has implemented a modified supply cost balancing account ("MCBA") to track and recover costs from supply mix changes and rate changes by wholesale suppliers, as authorized by the CPUC. However, cash flows from operations can be significantly affected since much of the balance we recognize in the MCBA is collected from or refunded to customers primarily through surcharges or surcredits, respectively, generally over twelve- to twenty-four-months.
Our liquidity and earnings may be adversely affected by our conservation efforts
Our water utility business is heavily dependent upon revenue generated from rates charged to our customers based on the volume of water used. The rates we charge for water are regulated by the CPUC and may not be adequately adjusted to reflect changes in demand. Declining usage also negatively impacts our long-term operating revenues if we are unable to secure rate increases or if growth in the customer base does not occur to the extent necessary to offset per-customer usage decline. 
Conservation by all customer classes at GSWC is a top priority.  However, customer conservation will result in lower volumes of water sold.  We may experience a decline in per-customer water usage due to factors such as:
conservation efforts to reduce costs;
drought conditions resulting in additional water conservation;
the use of more efficient household fixtures and appliances by customers to save water;
voluntary or mandatory changes in landscaping and irrigation patterns;
recycling of water by our customers; and
mandated water-use restrictions.
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These types of changes may result in permanent decreases in demand even if our water supplies are sufficient to meet higher levels of demand after a drought ends.  In addition, governmental restrictions on water usage during drought conditions may result in a decreased demand for water, even if our sources of supply are sufficient to serve our customers during such drought conditions.
We implemented the CPUC-approved WRAM at GSWC, which has the effect of stabilizing revenues at the adopted level thereby reducing the potential adverse earnings impact of our customers’ conservation efforts.  However, cash flows from operations can be significantly affected since much of the balance we recognize in the WRAM account is collected from or refunded to customers generally over twelve-, eighteen- or twenty-four-month periods. In addition, based on a CPUC decision effective August 27, 2020, any general rate case application filed after that date may not include a proposal to use the WRAM or MCBA, but may instead include a proposal to use a limited price adjustment mechanism and an incremental supply cost balancing account. Replacing the WRAM and MCBA could result in increased earnings volatility.
Electric Segment Operations Risks
Our electric segment operates in a high wildfire risk area
BVESI is required to adopt and implement a wildfire safety and mitigation plan that is submitted periodically to, and subject to the approval of, the CPUC. The recovery of costs incurred to implement this plan are not approved by the CPUC at the time of its approval of the wildfire mitigation plan, but will only be approved by the CPUC in a subsequent general rate case. We anticipate that the costs of capital improvements necessary to implement this program will increase substantially.
BVESI is also required to implement a public safety power shut-off program during high wildfire threat conditions. The CPUC may assess penalties if BVESI shuts-down power to its customers and the CPUC determines that the shutdown was not reasonably necessary in the circumstances.
BVESI has also obtained a safety certificate, which must be renewed annually by the CPUC. Even with an approved safety certificate, BVESI could be found liable for deaths, injuries and property damage if BVESI’s electric equipment is found to have caused a catastrophic wildfire. BVESI may not be able to recover the costs of all liabilities from such a wildfire from insurance or from ratepayers.
Our liquidity may be adversely affected by increases in electricity and natural gas prices in California
We purchase most of the electric energy sold to customers in our electric customer service area from others under purchased power contracts.  In addition to purchased power contracts, we purchase additional energy from the spot market to meet peak demand and following the expiration of purchased power contracts if there are delays in obtaining CPUC authorization of new purchase power contracts.  We may sell surplus power to the spot market during times of reduced energy demand.  As a result, our cash flows may be affected by increases in spot market prices of electricity purchased and decreases in spot market prices for electricity sold.  However, BVESI has implemented a CPUC-approved supply-cost balancing account to mitigate the impact to earnings from fluctuations in supply costs. 
Unexpected generator downtime at our 8.4 megawatt natural-gas-fueled generator or a failure to perform by any of the counterparties to our electric and natural gas purchase contracts could further increase our exposure to fluctuating natural gas and electricity prices. 
Changes in electricity prices also affect the unrealized gains and losses on our block forward purchased power contracts that qualify as derivative instruments since we adjust the asset or liability on these contracts to reflect the fair market value of the contracts at the end of each month.  The CPUC has authorized us to establish a memorandum account to track the changes in the fair market value of our purchased power contracts.  As a result, unrealized gains and losses on these types of purchased power contracts do not impact earnings. 
We may not be able to procure sufficient renewable energy resources to comply with CPUC rules
We are required to procure a portion of our electricity for BVESI from renewable energy resources to meet the CPUC’s renewable procurement requirements.  We have an agreement with a third party to purchase renewable energy credits, which we believe enables us to meet these requirements through 2023.  In the event that the third party fails to perform in accordance with the terms of the agreement, we may not be able to obtain sufficient resources to meet the renewable procurement requirements. We may be subject to fines and penalties by the CPUC if it determines that we are not in compliance with the renewable resource procurement rules. 

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Utility Privatization Contract Risks 
Our 50-year contracts for servicing military bases create certain risks that are different from our public utility operations
We have entered into contracts to provide water and/or wastewater services at military bases pursuant to 50-year firm, fixed-priced contracts, subject to termination, in whole or in part, for the convenience of the U.S. government.  In addition, the U.S. government may stop work under the terms of one or more of the contracts, delay performance of our obligations under the contracts or modify the contracts at its convenience. 
Our contract pricing is based on a number of assumptions, including assumptions about the condition and amount of infrastructure at the military bases, prices and availability of labor, equipment and materials. We may be unable to recover all costs if any of these assumptions are inaccurate or if all costs incurred in connection with performing the work were not considered. Our contracts are also subject to annual economic price adjustments or other changes permitted by the terms of the contracts. Prices are also subject to equitable adjustment based upon changes in circumstances, laws or regulations and service-requirement changes to the extent provided in each of the contracts.
We are required to record all costs under these types of contracts as they are incurred. As a result, we may record losses associated with unanticipated conditions that result in higher than estimated costs, higher than anticipated infrastructure levels, and required emergency work at the time such expenses occur.  We recognize additional revenue for such work as, and to the extent that, our economic price adjustments and/or requests for equitable adjustments are approved.  Delays in obtaining approval of economic price adjustments and/or equitable adjustments can negatively impact our results of operations and cash flows.
Certain payments under these contracts are subject to appropriations by Congress. We may experience delays in receiving payment or delays in price adjustments due to canceled or delayed appropriations specific to our projects or reductions in government spending for the military generally or military-base operations specifically. Appropriations and the timing of payment may be influenced by, among other things, the state of the economy, competing political priorities, budget constraints, the timing and amount of tax receipts, government shutdowns and the overall level of government expenditures.
Our contracts for the construction of infrastructure improvements on military bases create risks that are different from those of our public utility operations and maintenance activities
We have entered into contract modifications with the U.S. government and agreements with third parties for the construction of new water and/or wastewater infrastructure at the military bases on which we operate. Most of these contracts are firm fixed-price contracts. Under firm fixed-price contracts, we will benefit from cost savings, but are generally unable (except for changes in scope or circumstances approved by the U.S. government or third party) to recover any cost overruns to the approved contract price. Under most circumstances, the U.S. government or third party has approved increased-cost change orders due to changes in scope of work performed.
We generally recognize contract revenues from these types of contracts over time using input methods to measure progress towards satisfying a performance obligation. The measurement of performance over time is based on cost incurred relative to total estimated costs, or the physical completion of the construction projects. The earnings or losses recognized on individual contracts are based on periodic estimates of contract revenues, costs and profitability as these construction projects progress.
We establish prices for these types of firm fixed-price contracts and the overall 50-year contracts taken as a whole, based, in part, on cost estimates that are subject to a number of assumptions, including assumptions regarding future economic conditions. If these estimates prove inaccurate or circumstances change, cost overruns could have a material adverse effect on our contracted business operations and results of operations.
We may be adversely affected by disputes with the U.S. government regarding our performance of contracted services on military bases
Entering into contracts with the U.S. government subjects us to a number of operational and compliance risks over our performance of contracted services on military bases. We are periodically audited or reviewed by the Defense Contract Auditing Agency (“DCAA”) and/or the Defense Contract Management Agency ("DCMA") for compliance with federal acquisition regulations, cost-accounting standards and other laws, regulations and standards that are not applicable to the operations of GSWC or BVESI. During the course of these audits/reviews, the DCAA or DCMA may question our incurred project costs or the manner in which we have accounted for such costs and recommend to our U.S. government administrative contracting officer that such costs be disallowed. If there is a dispute with the U.S. government regarding performance under these contracts or the amounts owed to us, the U.S. government may delay, reject or withhold payment, delay price adjustments or assert its right to offset damages against amounts owed to us.  If we are unable to collect amounts owed to us on a timely basis or the U.S. government asserts its offset rights, profits and cash flows could be adversely affected.
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Moreover, we are subject to potential government investigations of our business practices and compliance with government procurement and security regulations. If we are charged with wrongdoing as a result of an investigation, or if we fail to comply with the terms of one or more of our U.S. government contracts, other agreements with the U.S. government or U.S. government statutes and regulations, our existing contracts could be terminated or we could be suspended or barred from future U.S. government contracts for a period of time, and be subject to possible damages, fines and penalties as well as damage to our reputation in the water and wastewater industry, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and cash flows.
We depend, to some extent, upon subcontractors to assist us in the performance of contracted services on military bases
We rely, to some extent, on subcontractors to assist us in the operation and maintenance of the water and wastewater systems at military bases. The failure of any of these subcontractors to perform services for us in accordance with the terms of our contracts with the U.S. government could result in the termination of our contract to provide water and/or wastewater services at the affected base(s), and/or a loss of revenues, or increases in costs, to correct a subcontractor’s performance failures.
We are also required to make a good faith effort to achieve our small business subcontracting plan goals pursuant to U.S. government regulations. If we fail to use good faith efforts to meet these goals, the U.S. government may assess damages against us at the end of the contract. The U.S. government has the right to offset claimed damages against any amounts owed to us.
We also rely on third-party manufacturers, as well as third-party subcontractors, to complete our construction projects. To the extent that we cannot engage subcontractors or acquire equipment or materials, our ability to complete a project in a timely fashion or at a profit may be impaired. If the amount of costs we incur for these projects exceeds the amount we have estimated in our bids, we could experience reduced profits or losses in the performance of these contracts. In addition, if a subcontractor or manufacturer is unable to deliver its services, equipment or materials according to the negotiated terms for any reason, including the deterioration of its financial condition, we may be required to purchase the services, equipment or materials from another source at a higher price. This may reduce the profit to be realized or result in a loss on a project for which the services, equipment or materials were needed.
If subcontractors fail to perform services to be provided to us or fail to provide us with the proper equipment or materials, we may be penalized for their failure to perform; however, our contracts with subcontractors include certain protective provisions, which may include the assessment of liquidated damages.  We also mitigate these risks by requiring our subcontractors, as appropriate, to obtain performance bonds and to compensate us for any penalties we may be required to pay as a result of their failure to perform. 
We may not be fully reimbursed for all of our construction costs or may only receive payment on a delayed basis
Unlike GSWC and BVESI, who recover their capital investments from customers over the life of the assets through annual depreciation and earn a return on such investments through the ratemaking process, ASUS is reimbursed for the cost of ongoing renewal and replacement construction projects plus a profit through the collection of a monthly cash stream under each of the 50-year contracts with the U.S. government. ASUS also receives funding from the U.S. government for initial and other new construction projects at the military bases it serves that, in many cases, are outside the scope of the 50-year contracts and are granted through firm-fixed contract modifications. Our Military Utility Privatization Subsidiaries expect to continue incurring significant construction costs. Reimbursement by the U.S government for these construction costs may not be fully reimbursable if the costs incurred are greater than the amounts estimated and approved by the U.S. government, or payments may be delayed awaiting government funding and processing, which could significantly affect our cash flows from operations.
Other Contracted Services Segment Risks
Risks associated with wastewater systems are different from those of our water distribution operations
The wastewater-collection-system operations of our ASUS subsidiaries providing wastewater services on military bases are subject to substantial regulation and involve significant environmental risks. If collection, treatment or disposal systems fail, overflow or do not operate properly, untreated wastewater or other contaminants could spill onto nearby properties or into nearby streams and rivers, causing damage to persons or property, injury to aquatic life and economic damages. The cost of addressing such damages may not be recoverable. This risk is most acute during periods of substantial rainfall or flooding, which are common causes of sewer overflows and system failures. These risks may be increased as a result of an increase in the duration and frequency of storms due to climate change. Liabilities resulting from such damage could adversely and materially affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. In the event that we are deemed liable for any damage caused by overflows, our losses may not be recoverable under our contracts with the U.S. government or covered by insurance policies. We may also find it difficult to secure insurance for this business in the future at acceptable rates.

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We may have responsibility for water quality at the military bases we serve
While it is the responsibility of the U.S. government to provide the source of water supply to meet the Military Utility Privatization Subsidiaries’ water distribution system requirements under their 50-year contracts, the Military Utility Privatization Subsidiaries, as the water system permit holders for most of the bases they serve, are responsible for ensuring the continued compliance of the provided source of supply with all federal, state and local regulations. We believe, however, that the terms of the contracts between the Military Utility Privatization Subsidiaries and the U.S. government provide the opportunity for us to recover costs incurred in the treatment or remediation of any quality issue that arises from the source of water supply.
Our earnings may be affected, to some extent, by weather during different seasons
Seasonal weather conditions, such as hurricanes, heavy rainfall or significant winter storms, occasionally cause temporary office closures and/or result in temporary halts to construction activity at military bases.  To the extent that our construction activities are impeded by these events, we will experience a delay in recognizing revenues from these construction projects.
We continue to incur costs associated with the expansion of our contract activities
We continue to incur additional costs in connection with the expansion of our contract operations associated with the preparation of bids for new contract operations on prospective and existing military bases. Our ability to recover these costs and to earn a profit on our contract operations will depend upon the extent to which we are successful in obtaining new contracts and recovering these costs and other costs from new contract revenues.
We face intense competition for new military privatization contracts
An important part of our growth strategy is the expansion of our contracted services business through new contract awards to serve additional military bases for the U.S. government. ASUS competes with other investor-owned utilities, municipalities, and other entities for these contracts.
Additionally, the U.S. government periodically reviews the cost and overall effectiveness of the military privatization program. Should these reviews prompt a decision to curtail or eliminate the issuance of solicitations for future military privatization contract awards, the potential for growth in this segment could be negatively impacted.
Information Technology Risk Factors
We must successfully maintain and/or upgrade our information technology systems as we are increasingly dependent on the continuous and reliable operation of these systems
We rely on various information technology systems to manage our operations. Such systems require periodic modifications, upgrades and/or replacement, which subject us to inherent costs and risks, including potential disruption of our internal control structure, substantial capital expenditures, additional administrative and operating expenses, retention of sufficiently skilled personnel to implement and operate the new systems, and other risks and costs of delays or difficulties in transitioning to new systems or of integrating new systems into our current systems. In addition, the difficulties with implementing new technology systems may cause disruptions in our business operations and have an adverse effect on our business and operations, if not anticipated and appropriately mitigated.
We rely on our computer, information and communications technology systems in connection with the operation of our business, especially with respect to customer service and billing, accounting and the monitoring and operation of our treatment, storage and pumping facilities.  Our computer and communications systems and operations could be damaged or interrupted by weather, natural disasters, telecommunications failures, cyber-attacks or acts of war or terrorism or similar events or disruptions.  Any of these or other events could cause system interruption, delays and loss of critical data, or delay or prevent operations and adversely affect our financial results and could result in liabilities not covered by insurance or recoverable in rates for misappropriation of assets or sensitive information, corruption of data and the impact of operational disruptions on our customers.
Security risks, data protection breaches and cyber-attacks could disrupt our internal operations, and any such disruption could increase our expenses, damage our reputation and adversely affect our stock price
There have been an increasing number of cyber-attacks on companies around the world, which have caused operational failures or compromised sensitive corporate or customer data.  These attacks have occurred over the internet, through malware, viruses or attachments to e-mails, or through persons inside the organization or with access to systems inside the organization.  Although we do not believe that our systems are at a materially greater risk of cyber security attacks than other similar organizations, our information technology systems remain at risk to damage or interruption from:
supply chain attacks;
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ransomware;
malware;
hacking; and
denial of service actions.
We have implemented security measures and will continue to devote significant resources to improve our security posture to address any security vulnerabilities in an effort to prevent cyber-attacks.  Despite our efforts, due to the evolving nature of cyber-attacks and vulnerabilities, we cannot be assured that a cyber-attack will not cause water, wastewater or electric system problems, disrupt service to our customers, compromise important data or systems or result in unintended release of customer or employee information.  Moreover, if a security breach affects our systems or results in the unauthorized release of sensitive data, our reputation could be materially damaged. We may not discover any security breach and loss of information for a significant period of time after the security breach. We could also be exposed to a risk of loss or litigation and possible liability. In addition, pursuant to U.S. government regulations regarding cyber-security of government contractors, we might be subject to fines, penalties or other actions, including debarment, with respect to current contracts or with respect to future contract opportunities. We maintain cybersecurity insurance to provide coverage for a portion of the losses and damages that may result from a security breach, but such insurance is subject to a number of exclusions and may not cover the total loss caused by a breach. Other costs associated with cyber events may not be covered by insurance or recoverable in rates. The market for cybersecurity insurance continues to evolve and may affect the future availability of cyber insurance at reasonable rates.
In addition, we must comply with privacy rights regulations such as The California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”), a state statute that became effective January 1, 2020, which enhances the privacy rights and consumer protections for California residents. Among other things, the CCPA establishes statutory damages for victims of data security breaches, and provides additional rights for consumers to obtain their data from any business that has their personally identifying information. Any actual or perceived failure to comply with the CCPA could lead to investigations, claims, and proceedings by governmental entities and private parties, damages for breach, and other significant costs, penalties, and other liabilities, as well as harm to our reputation.
Human Capital Management and Supply Risks
Failure to attract, retain, train, motivate, develop and transition key employees could adversely affect our business
In order to be successful, we must attract, retain, train, motivate, and develop key employees, including those in managerial, operational, financial, regulatory, business-development and information-technology support positions. Our regulated business and contracted services operations are complex. Attracting and retaining high quality staff allows us to minimize the cost of providing quality service. In order to attract and retain key employees in a competitive marketplace, we must provide a competitive compensation package and be able to effectively recruit qualified candidates. This is especially challenging for us since approximately 28% of our employees will be eligible to retire in the next five years. The failure to successfully hire key employees or the loss of a material number of key employees could have a significant impact on the quality of our operations in the short term. Further, changes in our management team may be disruptive to our business, and any failure to successfully transition key new hires or promoted employees could adversely affect our business and results of operations.
Failure of our employees to maintain required certifications and licenses or to complete required compliance training could adversely impact our ability to operate and maintain our utility systems and provide services to our customers
Many of our employees must have specialized certifications and licenses in order to perform their duties and periodically complete required compliance training. Our business could be adversely affected if our employees do not maintain their certifications and licenses or we are unable to attract employees with the necessary certifications and licenses.
Other Business Risk Factors
The accuracy of our judgments and estimates about financial and accounting matters will impact our operating results and financial condition
The quality and accuracy of estimates and judgments used have an impact on our operating results and financial condition. If our estimates are not accurate, we will be required to make an adjustment in a future period. We make certain estimates and judgments in preparing our financial statements regarding, among others:
timing of recovering WRAM and MCBA regulatory assets;
amounts to set aside for uncollectible accounts receivable, inventory obsolescence and uninsured losses;
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our legal exposure and the appropriate accrual for claims, including general liability and workers' compensation claims;
future costs and assumptions for pensions and other post-retirement benefits;
regulatory recovery of deferred items; and
possible tax uncertainties.
Market conditions and demographic changes may adversely impact the value of our benefit plan assets and liabilities
Market factors can affect assumptions we use in determining funding requirements with respect to our pension and other post-retirement benefit plans. For example, a relatively modest change in our assumptions regarding discount rates can materially affect our calculation of funding requirements. To the extent that market data compels us to reduce the discount rate used in our assumptions, our benefit obligations could materially increase, which could adversely affect our financial position and cash flows. Further, changes in demographics, such as increases in life expectancy assumptions may also increase the funding requirements of our obligations related to the pension and other post-retirement benefit plans.
Market conditions also affect the values of the assets that are held in trusts to satisfy significant future obligations under our pension and other post-retirement benefit plans. These assets are subject to market fluctuations, which may cause investment returns to fall below our projected rates of return. A decline in the market value of our pension and other post-retirement benefit plan assets will increase the funding requirements under these plans if future returns on these assets are insufficient to offset the decline in value. Future increases in pension and other post-retirement costs as a result of the reduced value of plan assets may not be fully recoverable in rates, and our results of operations and financial position could be negatively affected. These risks are mitigated to some extent by the two-way pension balancing accounts authorized by the CPUC, which permits us to track differences between forecasted annual pension expense adopted in water and electric rates and actual pension expenses for future recovery or refund to customers.
Our business requires significant capital expenditures and our inability to access the capital or financial markets could affect our ability to meet our liquidity needs and long-term commitments, which could adversely impact our operations and financial results
The utility business is capital intensive. We spend significant sums of money for additions to, or replacement of, our property, plant and equipment at our water and electric regulated utilities. We obtain funds for these capital projects from operations, contributions by developers and others, and refundable advances from developers (which are repaid over a period of time). We also periodically borrow money or issue equity for these purposes. In addition, we have revolving credit facilities that are partially used for these purposes. We cannot provide assurance that these sources will continue to be adequate or that the cost of funds will remain at levels permitting us to earn a reasonable rate of return.
As our capital investment program continues to increase, coupled with the elimination of bonus depreciation for regulated utilities due to tax reform, we will need access to external financing more often, which increases our exposure to market conditions. In addition to cash flow from operations, we rely primarily on our credit facilities and long-term private placement notes to satisfy our liquidity needs. Changes in market conditions, including events beyond our control, could also limit our ability to access capital on terms favorable to us or at all, including credit facilities with the borrowing capacities needed as well as issuing long-term debt. As a result, the amount of capital available may not be sufficient to meet all our liquidity needs at a reasonable cost at all of our subsidiaries.
The price of our Common Shares may be volatile and may be affected by market conditions beyond our control
The trading price of our Common Shares may fluctuate in the future because of the volatility of the stock market and a variety of other factors, many of which are beyond our control. Factors that could cause fluctuations in the trading price of our Common Shares include: changes in interest rates; regulatory developments; general economic conditions and trends; price and volume fluctuations in the overall stock market; actual or anticipated changes or fluctuations in our results of operations; actual or anticipated changes in the expectations of investors or securities analysts; actual or anticipated developments in other utilities' businesses or the competitive landscape generally; litigation involving us or our industry; major catastrophic events, or sales of large blocks of our stock.
Payment of our debt may be accelerated if we fail to comply with restrictive covenants in our debt agreements
Our failure to comply with restrictive covenants in our debt agreements could result in an event of default.  If the default is not cured or waived, we may be required to repay or refinance the debt before it becomes due.  Even if we are able to obtain waivers from our creditors, we may only be able to do so on unfavorable terms.
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AWR is a holding company that depends on cash flow from its subsidiaries to meet its financial obligations and to pay dividends on its Common Shares
As a holding company, our subsidiaries conduct substantially all operations and our only significant assets are investments in our subsidiaries. This means that we are dependent on distributions of funds from our subsidiaries to meet our debt service obligations and to pay dividends on our Common Shares. 
Our subsidiaries are separate and distinct legal entities and generally have no obligation to pay any amounts due on AWR's credit facility.  Our subsidiaries only pay dividends if and when declared by the respective subsidiary board.  Moreover, GSWC and BVESI are obligated to give first priority to their own capital requirements and to maintain capital structures consistent with those determined to be reasonable by the CPUC in its most recent decisions on capital structure for both GSWC and BVESI in order that customers not be adversely affected by the holding company structure.  Furthermore, our right to receive cash or other assets in the unlikely event of liquidation or reorganization of any of our subsidiaries is generally subject to the prior claims of creditors of that subsidiary.  If we are unable to obtain funds from a subsidiary in a timely manner, we may be unable to meet our financial obligations, make additional investments or pay dividends.
The final determination of our income tax liability may be materially different from our income tax provision
Significant judgment is required in determining our provision for income taxes. Our calculation of the provision for income taxes is subject to our interpretation of applicable tax laws in the jurisdictions in which we file. In addition, our income tax returns are subject to periodic examination by the Internal Revenue Service and other taxing authorities.
Although we believe our income tax estimates are appropriate, there is no assurance that the final determination of our current taxes payable will not be materially different, either higher or lower, from the amounts reflected in our financial statements. In the event we are assessed additional income taxes, our financial condition and cash flows could be adversely affected.
Our operations are geographically concentrated in California
Although we operate water and wastewater facilities in a number of states under our contracted services business, our regulated water and electric operations are concentrated in California, particularly Southern California.  As a result, our financial results are largely subject to political, water supply, labor, utility cost and regulatory risks, economic conditions, natural disasters (which may increase as a result of climate change) and other risks affecting California. Our financial results may also be impacted by population growth or decline in our service areas.
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
None.
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Item 2. Properties
Water Properties
As of December 31, 2021, GSWC’s physical properties consisted of water transmission and distribution systems, which included 2,860 miles of pipeline together with services, meters and fire hydrants, and approximately 450 parcels of land generally less than 1 acre each, on which are located wells, pumping plants, reservoirs and other water utility facilities, including three surface water treatment plants. GSWC also has franchises, easements and other rights of way for the purpose of accessing wells and tanks and constructing and using pipes and appurtenances for transmitting and distributing water. All of GSWC's properties are located in California.
As of December 31, 2021, GSWC owned 240 wells, of which 159 are active operable wells equipped with pumps with an aggregate production capacity of approximately 161 million gallons per day. GSWC has 58 connections to the water distribution facilities of the MWD, and other municipal water agencies. GSWC’s storage reservoirs and tanks have an aggregate capacity of approximately 114.6 million gallons. GSWC owns no dams. The following table provides, in greater detail, information regarding the water utility plant of GSWC: 
PumpsDistribution FacilitiesReservoirs
WellBoosterMains*ServicesHydrantsTanksCapacity*
240 385 2,860 262,770 26,684 142 114.6 (1)

* Reservoir capacity is measured in millions of gallons. Mains are in miles.
(1)  GSWC has additional capacity in its Bay Point system, through an exclusive capacity right to use 4.4 million gallons per day from a treatment plant owned by Contra Costa Water District. GSWC also has additional reservoir capacity through an exclusive right-to-use all of one 8 million gallon reservoir, one-half of another 8 million gallon reservoir, and one-half of a treatment plant’s capacity, all owned by Three Valleys Municipal Water District.
Electric Properties
BVESI's properties are located in the Big Bear area of San Bernardino County, California. As of December 31, 2021, BVESI owned and operated approximately 87.8 miles of overhead 34.5 kilovolt (kv) sub-transmission lines, 6.49 miles of underground 34.5 kv sub-transmission lines, 491.4 miles of overhead 4.16 kv or 2.4 kv distribution lines, 113.6 miles of underground cable, 13 sub-stations and a natural gas-fueled 8.4 MW peaking generation facility. BVESI also has franchises, easements and other rights of way for the purpose of constructing and using poles, wires and other appurtenances for transmitting electricity.
Adjudicated and Other Water Rights
GSWC owns groundwater and surface water rights in California.  Groundwater rights are further subject to classification as either adjudicated or unadjudicated rights.  Adjudicated rights have been established through comprehensive litigation in the courts, and the annual extraction quantities and use of the adjudicated rights are often subject to the provisions of the judgment for that particular groundwater basin. Additionally, as a result of the adjudication, many of these groundwater basins are managed by a watermaster that is charged with enforcing the provisions of the judgment, which may include determining operating safe yields based on the water supply conditions of the groundwater basin.
GSWC actively manages its adjudicated groundwater rights portfolio with the goal of optimizing and making this source of supply sustainable. Unadjudicated rights are subject to further regulation by the State Water Resources Control Board (“SWRCB”) and the California Department of Water Resources. Surface water rights are quantified and managed by the SWRCB, unless the surface water rights originated prior to 1914. As of December 31, 2021, GSWC had adjudicated groundwater rights and surface water rights of 70,941 and 11,335 acre-feet per year, respectively. GSWC also has a number of unadjudicated groundwater rights, which have not been quantified, but are typically measured by historical usage. 
Office Buildings
GSWC owns its general headquarters facility in San Dimas, California. GSWC also owns and leases customer service offices and office space throughout California. BVESI owns office space in California. ASUS leases office facilities in Georgia, Virginia, Texas and North Carolina, and owns service centers in Florida, Maryland, South Carolina, Virginia, Texas, North Carolina and Kansas.
Mortgage and Other Liens
As of December 31, 2021, neither AWR, GSWC, BVESI, ASUS, nor any of its subsidiaries, had any mortgage debt or liens securing indebtedness outstanding. Under the terms of certain debt instruments, AWR, GSWC and BVESI are prohibited from issuing any secured debt, without providing equal and ratable security to the holders of this existing debt.
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Condemnation of Properties
The laws of the state of California provide for the acquisition of public utility property by governmental agencies through their power of eminent domain, also known as condemnation, where doing so constitutes a more necessary use. In addition, these laws provide that the owner of utility property (i) may contest whether the condemnation is actually necessary, and (ii) is entitled to receive the fair market value of its property if the property is ultimately taken.
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
Registrant is subject to ordinary routine litigation incidental to its business, some of which may include claims for compensatory and punitive damages. Management believes that rate recovery, proper insurance coverage and reserves are in place to insure against, among other things, property, general liability, employment, and workers’ compensation claims incurred in the ordinary course of business. Insurance coverage may not cover certain claims involving punitive damages.
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosure
Not applicable.
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PART II 
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Stock Performance Graph
The graph below compares the cumulative 5-Year total return of American States Water Company's Common Shares with the cumulative total returns of the S&P 500 index and a customized peer group of seven water utilities that includes: American Water Works Company Inc., Essential Utilities Inc., Artesian Resources Corporation, California Water Service Group, Middlesex Water Co, York Water Co. and SJW Group. In accordance with SEC guidance, the returns of the seven utilities included in the peer group are weighted according to their respective market capitalizations.
An investment of $100 (with reinvestment of all dividends) is assumed to have been made in our Common Shares, and in the common stock in the index and in the peer group on December 31, 2016. Relative performance is tracked through December 31, 2021.
awr-20211231_g1.jpg
 12/201612/201712/201812/201912/202012/2021
American States Water Company$100.00 $129.76 $153.01 $200.73 $187.16 $247.53 
S&P 500$100.00 $121.83 $116.49 $153.17 $181.35 $233.41 
Peer Group$100.00 $128.06 $126.59 $170.84 $199.95 $246.86 
The stock price performance included in this graph is not necessarily indicative of future stock price performance.
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Market Information Relating to Common Shares
Common Shares of American States Water Company are traded on the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) under the symbol “AWR.” The intraday high and low NYSE prices on the Common Shares for each quarter during the past two years were:
 Stock Prices
 HighLow
2021 
First Quarter$83.05 $70.07 
Second Quarter$83.75 $75.34 
Third Quarter$94.96 $79.57 
Fourth Quarter$103.77 $84.93 
2020  
First Quarter$96.64 $65.11 
Second Quarter$91.11 $72.88 
Third Quarter$82.19 $69.25 
Fourth Quarter$80.94 $71.84 
The closing price of the Common Shares of American States Water Company on the NYSE on February 18, 2022 was $86.03.
Approximate Number of Holders of Common Shares
As of February 18, 2022, there were 2,011 holders of record of the 36,945,434 outstanding Common Shares of American States Water Company. AWR owns all of the outstanding Common Shares of GSWC, BVESI and ASUS. ASUS owns all of the outstanding stock of the Military Utility Privatization Subsidiaries.
Frequency and Amount of Any Dividends Declared and Dividend Restrictions
For the last two years, AWR has paid dividends on its Common Shares on or about March 1, June 1, September 1 and December 1. The following table lists the amounts of dividends paid on Common Shares of American States Water Company:
 20212020
First Quarter$0.335 $0.305 
Second Quarter$0.335 $0.305 
Third Quarter$0.365 $0.335 
Fourth Quarter$0.365 $0.335 
Total$1.400 $1.280 
AWR’s ability to pay dividends is subject to the requirement in its revolving credit facility to maintain compliance with all covenants described in Note 9 Bank Debt included in Part II, Item 8, in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements. GSWC is prohibited under the terms of its senior notes from paying dividends if, after giving effect to the dividend, its total indebtedness to capitalization ratio (as defined) would be more than 0.6667-to-1.  GSWC would have to issue additional debt of $661.4 million to invoke this covenant as of December 31, 2021.
Under California law, AWR, GSWC, BVESI and ASUS are each permitted to distribute dividends to its shareholders and repurchase its shares so long as the Board of Directors determines, in good faith, that either: (i) the value of the corporation’s assets equals or exceeds the sum of its total liabilities immediately after the dividend, or (ii) its retained earnings equals or exceeds the amount of the distribution.  
Under the least restrictive of the California tests, approximately $685.9 million was available to pay dividends to AWR’s common shareholders and repurchase shares from AWR’s common shareholders at December 31, 2021. Approximately $615.7 million was available for GSWC to pay dividends to AWR at December 31, 2021, and approximately $70.7 million was available for BVESI to pay dividends to AWR at December 31, 2021. BVESI has a separate revolving credit facility, and its ability to pay dividends is subject to the requirement in the credit agreement to maintain compliance with all covenants described in Note 9 Bank Debt.
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ASUS's ability to pay dividends to AWR is dependent upon the ability of each of the Military Utility Privatization Subsidiaries to pay dividends to ASUS under applicable state law as well as ASUS's ability to pay dividends under California law.
AWR paid $51.7 million in dividends to shareholders for the year ended December 31, 2021, as compared to $47.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2020. GSWC paid dividends of $38.3 million and $22.5 million to AWR in 2021 and 2020, respectively. BVESI did not pay dividends during 2021, and paid dividends of $12.4 million to AWR in 2020. ASUS did not pay dividends in 2021, and paid dividends of $12.4 million to AWR in 2020.
Other Information
The shareholders of AWR have approved the material features of all equity-compensation plans under which AWR directly issues equity securities. AWR did not directly issue any unregistered equity securities during 2021.
The following table provides information about AWR repurchases of its Common Shares during the fourth quarter of 2021:
PeriodTotal Number of Shares PurchasedAverage Price Paid per ShareTotal Number of
Shares Purchased as
Part of Publicly
Announced Plans or Programs (1)
Maximum Number
of Shares That May
Yet Be Purchased
under the Plans or Programs (1)(3)
October 1 - 31, 2021401 $88.48 — — 
November 1 - 30, 20218,078 $92.60 — — 
December 1 - 31, 20212,275 $96.07 — — 
Total10,754 (2)$93.18 — 
(1)         None of the Common Shares were repurchased pursuant to any publicly announced stock repurchase program.
(2)         Of these amounts, 7,554 Common Shares were acquired on the open market for employees pursuant to the 401(k) Plan. The remainder of the shares were acquired on the open market for participants in the Common Share Purchase and Dividend Reinvestment Plan.
(3)         Neither the 401(k) plan nor the Common Share Purchase and Dividend Reinvestment Plan contains a maximum number of common shares that may be purchased in the open market.
Item 6. (Reserved)
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Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation
The following discussion and analysis provides information on AWR’s consolidated operations and assets and, where necessary, includes specific references to AWR’s individual segments and/or its subsidiaries: GSWC, BVESI and ASUS and its subsidiaries, and AWR (parent) where applicable.  On July 1, 2020, GSWC completed the transfer of the electric utility assets and liabilities from its electric division to BVESI in exchange for common shares of BVESI. GSWC then immediately distributed all of BVESI's common shares to AWR, whereupon BVESI became wholly owned directly by AWR. The reorganization did not result in any substantive changes to AWR's operations or business segments.
Included in the following analysis is a discussion of Registrant’s operations in terms of earnings per share by business segment and AWR (parent), which equals each business segment's earnings divided by Registrant's weighted average number of diluted common shares.  This item is derived from consolidated financial information but is not presented in our financial statements that are prepared in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) in the United States. This item constitutes a "non-GAAP financial measure" under the Securities and Exchange Commission rules.
Registrant believes that the disclosure of earnings per share by business segment provides investors with clarity surrounding the performance of its segments.  Registrant reviews this measurement regularly and compares it to historical periods and to its operating budget. However, this measure, which is not presented in accordance with GAAP, may not be comparable to similarly titled measures used by other enterprises and should not be considered as an alternative to earnings per share, which is determined in accordance with GAAP. A reconciliation to AWR’s consolidated diluted earnings per share is included in the discussion under the sections titled “Summary Results by Segment.
Overview
Factors affecting our financial performance are summarized under the Overview section in Item 1. Business and Item 1A. Risk Factors.
Water and Electric Segments:
GSWC's and BVESI's revenues, operating income, and cash flows are earned primarily through delivering potable water to homes and businesses in California and electricity in the Big Bear area of San Bernardino County, California, respectively. Rates charged to GSWC and BVESI customers are determined by the CPUC. These rates are intended to allow recovery of operating costs and a reasonable rate of return on capital.  GSWC and BVESI plan to continue seeking additional rate increases in future years from the CPUC to recover operating and supply costs, and receive reasonable returns on invested capital. Capital expenditures in future years at GSWC and BVESI are expected to remain at substantially higher levels than depreciation expense. When necessary, GSWC and BVESI may obtain funds from external sources in the capital markets and through bank borrowings.
General Rate Case Filings and Other Matters:
Water General Rate Case for years 2022 - 2024:
On July 15, 2020, GSWC filed a general rate case application for all of its water regions and its general office. This general rate case will determine new water rates for the years 2022 – 2024. In November 2021, GSWC and the Public Advocates Office at the CPUC ("Public Advocates") filed with the CPUC a joint motion to adopt a settlement agreement between GSWC and Public Advocates on this general rate case application. The settlement agreement, if approved, resolves all issues related to the 2022 annual revenue requirement in the general rate case application, leaving only three unresolved issues. Among other things, the settlement authorizes GSWC to invest approximately $404.8 million in capital infrastructure over the three-year cycle. The settlement also authorizes GSWC to complete certain advice letter capital projects approved in the last general rate case, which have recently been completed for a total capital investment of $9.4 million. The additional annual revenue requirements generated from these capital investments are $1.2 million and became effective February 15, 2022. Advice letter projects are filed for revenue recovery only when those projects are completed. Excluding the advice letter project revenues, the amounts included in the settlement agreement would increase the 2022 adopted revenues by approximately $30.3 million as compared to the 2021 adopted revenues, and increase the 2022 adopted supply costs by $9.7 million as compared to the 2021 adopted supply costs. The settlement agreement also allows for potential additional increases in adopted revenues for 2023 and 2024 subject to an earnings test and changes to the forecasted inflationary index values.
The three remaining unresolved issues relate to GSWC's requests for: (i) a medical cost balancing account, (ii) a general liability insurance cost balancing account, and (iii) the consolidation of two of GSWC's customer service areas. GSWC and Public Advocates have filed briefs with the CPUC on these unsettled issues. A proposed decision is expected in mid-2022, and would address the three unresolved issues along with the settlement agreement filed by GSWC and Public Advocates. Pending a final decision on this general rate case application, GSWC filed with the CPUC for interim rates, which will make new 2022 rates, once approved in a CPUC final decision, retroactively effective January 1, 2022.

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Water General Rate Case for years 2019 2021:
In May 2019, the CPUC issued a final decision in GSWC's water general rate case for the years 2019 – 2021, with rates retroactive to January 1, 2019. Among other things, the final decision authorized GSWC to invest approximately $334.5 million over the rate cycle. The $334.5 million of infrastructure investment included $20.4 million of capital projects to be filed for revenue recovery through advice letters when those projects are completed. Due to changes in circumstances, including permitting delays, scope adjustments and constraints out of GSWC's control, not all the anticipated advice letter projects have been completed during this rate cycle. The majority of the $20.4 million of advice letter capital projects were included in GSWC’s water general rate case for the years 2022 – 2024.
The final decision also allowed for water rate increases in 2020 and 2021, subject to an earnings test. Effective January 1, 2020, GSWC received its full second-year step increase, which it achieved because of passing an earnings test at all of its ratemaking areas. The full step increase generated an additional $9.6 million in water revenues for 2020. Adopted supply costs for 2020 were $789,000 lower than the 2019 adopted supply costs. The CPUC also approved all of the third-year rate increases effective January 1, 2021, which generated an additional increase in the adopted water revenues of approximately $16.4 million in 2021. Adopted water supply costs for 2021 were $5.3 million higher than the 2020 adopted supply costs.
Final Decision in the First Phase of the Low-Income Affordability Rulemaking:
On August 27, 2020, the CPUC issued a final decision in the first phase of the CPUC’s Order Instituting Rulemaking evaluating the low income ratepayer assistance and affordability objectives contained in the CPUC’s 2010 Water Action Plan. This decision also addressed other issues, including the continued use of the Water Revenue Adjustment Mechanism ("WRAM") and the Modified Cost Balancing Account ("MCBA"). The MCBA is a full-cost balancing account used to track the difference between adopted and actual water supply costs (including the effects of changes in both rates and volume). Based on the final decision, any general rate case application filed by GSWC and the other California water utilities after August 27, 2020 may not include a proposal to continue the use of the WRAM or MCBA, but may instead include a proposal to use a limited price adjustment mechanism and an incremental supply cost balancing account.
The final decision did not have any impact on GSWC's WRAM or MCBA balances during the 2019 – 2021 rate cycle. In February 2021, the assigned administrative law judge in the pending general rate case proceeding confirmed that GSWC may continue using the WRAM and MCBA through the year 2024. GSWC’s next general rate case application will be filed in 2023 to establish new rates for the years 2025 – 2027, which may not include the WRAM or MCBA for those years.
Since its implementation in 2008, the WRAM and MCBA have helped mitigate fluctuations in GSWC’s earnings due to changes in water consumption by its customers or changes in water supply mix. Replacing them with mechanisms recommended in the final decision will likely result in more volatility in GSWC’s future earnings and could result in less than, or more than, full recovery of its authorized revenue and supply costs. In October 2020, GSWC, certain other California water utilities, and the California Water Association filed separate applications for rehearing on this matter. Due to the delay in the CPUC issuing a decision on any of these applications for rehearing, GSWC filed a petition for writ of review to the California Supreme Court in May 2021, requesting the Court to review the CPUC's final decision on this matter. The CPUC requested that the Court hold GSWC’s request in abeyance until such time as the CPUC acts on the pending request for rehearing. In September 2021, the CPUC issued a decision denying all the October 2020 applications for rehearing. In October 2021, GSWC re-filed its writ of review to the California Supreme Court, requesting the Court to review the CPUC's final decision on this matter. Certain other California water utilities, and the California Water Association also filed separate writs of review with the Court. On January 28, 2022, the CPUC served its response to GSWC’s and other parties petitions requesting the Court to deny the requests. Management cannot currently predict the final outcome of this matter.
Final Decision in the Second Phase of the Low-Income Affordability Rulemaking:
On July 15, 2021, the CPUC issued a final decision in the second phase of the Low-Income Affordability Rulemaking. Among other things, the decision extended the suspension of water-service disconnection implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic due to non-payment of past-due amounts billed to residential customers until February 1, 2022. The final decision also requires that amounts tracked in GSWC's COVID-19 Catastrophic Event Memorandum Account ("CEMA") account for unpaid customer bills be first offset by any (i) federal or state relief for customers' utility bill debt, and (ii) customer payments through payment-plan arrangements prior to receiving recovery from customers at large. In January 2022, GSWC received $9.5 million from the state of California of relief funding for customers' unpaid water bills incurred during the pandemic, which it is applying to its delinquent customers' eligible balances as discussed later under the section titled COVID-19. In August 2021, GSWC, in addition to three other parties, filed separate applications to the CPUC for rehearing on certain aspects of this final decision. In January 2022, the California Water Association filed a writ of review to the California Supreme Court, urging the Court to review the CPUC's final decision on the second phase of the Low-Income Affordability Rulemaking. Management cannot currently predict the final outcome of this matter.
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Cost of Capital Proceeding:
Investor-owned water utilities serving California are required to file their cost of capital applications on a triennial basis. GSWC filed a cost of capital application with the CPUC in May 2021 requesting a capital structure of 57% equity and 43% debt, a return on equity of 10.5%, and a return on rate base of 8.18%. Hearings on this proceeding are scheduled for the second quarter of 2022. A proposed decision on this proceeding is expected in the second half of 2022. A final decision on this proceeding, once issued by the CPUC, is expected to have an effective date retroactive to January 1, 2022. GSWC's last authorized rate of return on rate base of 7.91% remained applicable through December 31, 2021.
Electric Segment:
On August 15, 2019, the CPUC issued a final decision on the electric general rate case. Among other things, the decision (i) extended the rate cycle by one year (new rates were effective for 2018 - 2022); (ii) allows the electric segment to construct all the capital projects requested in its application, which are dedicated to improving system safety and reliability and total approximately $44 million over the 5-year rate cycle; and (iii) increased the adopted electric revenues by $1.2 million for each of the years 2019 and 2020, by $1.1 million in 2021, and by $1.0 million in 2022. The rate increases for 2019 – 2022 are not subject to an earnings test. The decision authorized a return on equity for the electric segment of 9.6% and included a capital structure and debt cost that is consistent with those approved by the CPUC in March 2018 in connection with GSWC's water segment cost of capital proceeding. The rate case decision continues to apply to BVESI.
Contracted Services Segment:
ASUS's revenues, operating income and cash flows are earned by providing water and/or wastewater services, including operation and maintenance services and construction of facilities at the water and/or wastewater systems at various military installations, pursuant to 50-year firm fixed-price contracts. The contract price for each of these 50-year contracts is subject to annual economic price adjustments. Additional revenues generated by contract operations are primarily dependent on new construction activities under contract modifications with the U.S. government or agreements with other third-party prime contractors.
COVID-19:
GSWC, BVESI and ASUS have continued their operations throughout the COVID-19 pandemic given that their water, wastewater and electric utility services are deemed essential. AWR's responses take into account orders issued by the CPUC, and the guidance provided by federal, state, and local health authorities and other government officials for the COVID-19 pandemic. Some of the actions taken by GSWC and BVESI included suspending service disconnections for nonpayment pursuant to CPUC and state orders, and telecommuting by employees. The suspension of water-service disconnections at GSWC was implemented in response to an executive order from the governor of California, as well as CPUC orders. Pursuant to the CPUC's July 15, 2021 decision in the Second Phase of the Low-Income Affordability Rulemaking discussed previously, the moratorium on water-service disconnections due to non-payment of past-due amounts billed to residential customers expired on February 1, 2022. However, water service cannot be disconnected so long as customers make timely payments on current bills, and are provided and adhere to payment plans to pay down past-due bills resulting from the pandemic. The moratorium on electric customer service disconnections ended on September 30, 2021. However, electric-service disconnections for non-payment can only be done after taking into account certain conditions such as average daily temperatures.
The pandemic has caused volatility in financial markets resulting in fluctuations in the fair value of plan assets in GSWC's pension and other retirement plans. In addition, the economic impact of the pandemic has also significantly increased the amount of delinquent customer accounts receivable, resulting in both GSWC and BVESI increasing their allowance for doubtful accounts throughout the pandemic. However, the CPUC has authorized GSWC and BVESI to track incremental costs, including bad debt expense in excess of what is included in their respective revenue requirements, incurred as a result of the pandemic in COVID-19-related memorandum accounts to be filed with the CPUC for future recovery.
On July 12, 2021, the governor of California approved SB-129 Budget Act of 2021, in which nearly $1 billion in relief funding for overdue water customer bills, and nearly $1 billion in relief funding for overdue electric customer bills were included. The water customer relief funding is being managed by the State Water Resources Control Board ("SWRCB") through the California Water and Wastewater Arrearage Payment Program to provide assistance to customers for their water debt accrued during the COVID-19 pandemic by remitting federal funds that the state received from the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 to the utility on behalf of eligible customers. In December 2021, GSWC received SWRCB approval for $9.5 million of relief funding of customers' unpaid water bills incurred during the pandemic. In January 2022, GSWC received these funds, which it is applying to its delinquent customers' eligible balances. Accordingly, as of December 31, 2021, GSWC has reflected these relief funds as a reduction to its COVID-19 CEMA account, as well as a reduction to its estimated customer
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bad debt reserve. In February 2022, BVESI received $321,000 from the state of California for similar customer relief funding for unpaid electric bills incurred during the pandemic.

GSWC and BVESI continue to experience delinquent account activity because of the ongoing pandemic. As of December 31, 2021, GSWC and BVESI had approximately $1.7 million and $302,000, respectively, in regulatory asset accounts related to bad debt expense in excess of their revenue requirements, the purchase of personal protective equipment, additional printing costs, and other incremental COVID-19-related costs. The CPUC requires that amounts tracked in GSWC's and BVESI's COVID-19 memorandum accounts for unpaid customer bills be first offset by any (i) federal or state relief for customers' utility bill debt, and (ii) customer payments through payment-plan arrangements prior to receiving recovery from customers at large. After these offsets are made, GSWC and BVESI will each file with the CPUC for recovery of any remaining balances.
By tracking incremental COVID-19-related costs in the CPUC-approved memorandum accounts, GSWC and BVESI can later ask for recovery of these costs from the CPUC. The CEMA and other emergency-type memorandum accounts are established as a result of a state or federally declared emergency, and are therefore recognized as regulatory assets for future recovery. As a result, the amounts recorded in the COVID-19-related memorandum accounts have not impacted GSWC's and BVESI's earnings during the pandemic. ASUS has experienced delays in receiving contract modifications from the U.S. government for additional construction projects due to government staffing shortages resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic but this has not had a material impact on its current operations.
In September 2021, the president of the United States issued orders and instructions on mandatory COVID-19 vaccination of all federal employees, federal contractors and employees of companies with 100 or more employees. On January 13, 2022, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled to stop the president's administration from enforcing a requirement that employees at businesses with at least 100 employees be vaccinated against COVID-19 or undergo weekly testing and wear a mask on the job. Therefore, there is no COVID-19 vaccination mandate for Registrant’s regulated utilities workforce. However, although the federal contractor COVID-19 mandate has been challenged, it was not addressed in the January 13, 2022 ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court and, therefore, its applicability to Registrant’s non-regulated workforce remains uncertain at this time.
Summary Results by Segment
The table below sets forth a comparison of the diluted earnings per share contribution by business segment and for the parent company for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020.  
 Diluted Earnings per Share
 Year Ended 
 12/31/202112/31/2020CHANGE
Water$1.87 $1.66 $0.21 
Electric0.21 0.20 0.01 
Contracted services0.48 0.47 0.01 
AWR (parent)(0.01)— (0.01)
Consolidated fully diluted earnings per share, as reported (GAAP)$2.55 $2.33 $0.22 
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The following is a computation and reconciliation of diluted earnings per share from the measure of operating income by business segment as disclosed in Note 17 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, to AWR’s consolidated fully diluted earnings per common share for the year ended December 31, 2021 and 2020:
WaterElectricContracted ServicesAWR (Parent)Consolidated (GAAP)
In 000's except per share amounts2021202020212020202120202021202020212020
Operating income (Note 17)$107,573 $97,896 $10,738 $10,303 $22,675 $22,309 $(9)$(9)$140,977 $130,499 
Other income and expense16,263 15,817 (101)336 (488)(358)533 82 16,207 15,877 
Income tax expense (benefit)22,095 20,515 2,975 2,689 5,434 5,201 (81)(208)30,423 28,197 
Net income (loss)$69,215 $61,564 $7,864 $7,278 $17,729 $17,466 $(461)$117 $94,347 $86,425 
Weighted Average Number of Diluted Shares37,010 36,995 37,010 36,995 37,010 36,995 37,010 36,995 37,010 36,995 
Diluted earnings per share$1.87 $1.66 $0.21 $0.20 $0.48 $0.47 $(0.01)$— $2.55 $2.33 
Water Segment:
Diluted earnings per share from the water segment for the year ended December 31, 2021 increased by $0.21 per share as compared to 2020. Included in the results for 2021 were gains on investments held to fund one of the Company's retirement plans totaling $4.3 million, or $0.08 per share, as compared to $3.0 million, or $0.06 per share, in gains generated during 2020 largely due to market conditions. Excluding these gains from both years, adjusted diluted earnings at the water segment for 2021 were $1.79 per share as compared to adjusted diluted earnings of $1.60 per share for 2020. This adjusted increase of $0.19 per share was due to the following items:
An increase in the water segment’s operating revenues of $16.5 million, largely as a result of new rates authorized by the CPUC. GSWC received its full third-year step increase effective January 1, 2021 as well as mid-year increases to reflect higher water supply costs. Due to regulatory mechanisms in place for water supply costs, the increase in operating revenues includes the full recovery of increases in supply costs discussed below.
An increase in water supply costs of $4.1 million, which consist of purchased water, purchased power for pumping, groundwater production assessments and changes in the water supply cost balancing accounts. Actual water supply costs are tracked and passed through to customers on a dollar-for-dollar basis by way of the CPUC-approved water supply cost balancing accounts. The increase in water supply costs results in a corresponding increase in water operating revenues and has no net impact on the water segment’s profitability.
An overall increase in operating expenses (excluding supply costs and a gain on the sale of assets) of $3.1 million, which negatively impacted the water segment's earnings. The increase was primarily due to higher chemical and water treatment costs, conservation costs, regulatory costs, insurance costs, depreciation expense, and property and other taxes as compared to 2020, partially offset by a decrease in maintenance expense.
The sale of non-utility-related land at the water segment resulted in a gain of $409,000 recorded during 2021, with no equivalent item in 2020.
An overall increase in interest expense (net of interest and other income) of $1.7 million, which negatively impacted earnings. GSWC issued $160 million of long-term debt in July 2020 and used the proceeds to pay down its intercompany borrowings (as required by the CPUC); intercompany borrowings bear lower short-term rates. There was also a decrease in interest income earned on regulatory assets at the water segment bearing interest at the current 90-day commercial paper rate, which decreased compared to 2020, as well as a decrease in the receipt of other income amounts owed by developers.
A decrease in the effective income tax rate, which favorably impacted earnings. The decrease resulted primarily from changes in certain flow-through taxes and permanent items during 2021 as compared to 2020. As a regulated utility, GSWC treats certain temporary differences as flow-through in computing its income tax expense consistent with the income tax method used in its CPUC-jurisdiction ratemaking. Changes in the magnitude of flow-through items either increase or decrease tax expense, thereby affecting diluted earnings per share.     
Electric Segment:
Diluted earnings from the electric segment was $0.21 per share for 2021, as compared to $0.20 per share recorded for 2020, an increase of $0.01 per share. There was an increase in electric revenues due to CPUC-approved rate increases effective January 1, 2021, as well as lower interest expense as compared to 2020. The decrease in interest expense was due primarily to the elimination of interest expense allocated from GSWC effective July 1, 2020 as a result of the spin-off of GSWC's electric division to BVESI. These increases to net earnings were partially offset by an increase in electric supply costs and other operating expenses. Due to regulatory mechanisms in place, the increase in electric supply costs results in a corresponding increase in electric operating revenues and has no net impact on the electric segment’s profitability.
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Contracted Services Segment:
Diluted earnings from the contracted services segment was $0.48 per share, as compared to $0.47 per share for 2020, an increase of $0.01 per share. This was due to an increase in management fee revenue, as well as a decrease in overall operating expenses, partially offset by overall lower construction activity as compared to 2020. The decrease in overall operating expenses was due to, among other things, lower legal and outside services costs and other non-income taxes.
AWR (Parent):
For the year ended December 31, 2021, diluted earnings from AWR (parent) decreased $0.01 per share compared to 2020 due primarily to changes in state unitary taxes.
The following discussion and analysis for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020 provide information on AWR’s consolidated operations and assets and, where necessary, includes specific references to AWR’s individual segments and subsidiaries: GSWC, BVESI and ASUS and its subsidiaries.
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Consolidated Results of Operations — Years Ended December 31, 2021 and 2020 (amounts in thousands, except per share amounts):
Year EndedYear Ended$%
12/31/202112/31/2020CHANGECHANGE
OPERATING REVENUES    
Water$347,112 $330,637 $16,475 5.0 %
Electric38,345 37,024 1,321 3.6 %
Contracted services113,396 120,582 (7,186)-6.0 %
Total operating revenues498,853 488,243 10,610 2.2 %
OPERATING EXPENSES    
Water purchased77,914 74,554 3,360 4.5 %
Power purchased for pumping11,103 10,134 969 9.6 %
Groundwater production assessment19,412 20,392 (980)-4.8 %
Power purchased for resale11,240 10,423 817 7.8 %
Supply cost balancing accounts(11,421)(11,803)382 -3.2 %
Other operation 34,738 33,236 1,502 4.5 %
Administrative and general 83,547 83,615 (68)-0.1 %
Depreciation and amortization39,596 36,850 2,746 7.5 %
Maintenance12,781 15,702 (2,921)-18.6 %
Property and other taxes22,522 22,199 323 1.5 %
ASUS construction56,909 62,411 (5,502)-8.8 %
(Gain) loss on sale of assets(465)31 (496)*
Total operating expenses357,876 357,744 132 — %
OPERATING INCOME140,977 130,499 10,478 8.0 %
OTHER INCOME AND EXPENSES    
Interest expense(22,834)(22,531)(303)1.3 %
Interest income1,493 1,801 (308)-17.1 %
Other, net5,134 4,853 281 5.8 %
 (16,207)(15,877)(330)2.1 %
INCOME FROM OPERATIONS BEFORE INCOME TAX EXPENSE124,770 114,622 10,148 8.9 %
Income tax expense30,423 28,197 2,226 7.9 %
NET INCOME$94,347 $86,425 $7,922 9.2 %
Basic earnings per Common Share$2.55 $2.34 $0.21 9.0 %
Fully diluted earnings per Common Share$2.55 $2.33 $0.22 9.4 %
* not meaningful
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Operating Revenues
General
GSWC and BVESI rely upon approvals by the CPUC of rate increases to recover operating expenses and to provide for a return on invested and borrowed capital used to fund utility plant. ASUS relies on economic price and equitable adjustments by the U.S. government in order to recover operating expenses and provide a profit margin for ASUS. Current operating revenues and earnings may be negatively impacted if the Military Utility Privatization Subsidiaries do not receive adequate price adjustments in a timely manner. ASUS’s earnings are also impacted by the level of construction projects at the Military Utility Privatization Subsidiaries, which may or may not continue at current levels in future periods.
Water
For the year ended December 31, 2021, revenues from water operations increased by $16.5 million to $347.1 million, compared to the year ended December 31, 2020 as a result of full third-year step increases for 2021 approved by the CPUC. These increases were partially offset by lower CPUC-approved surcharges billed in 2021 to recover previously incurred costs. These surcharges are largely offset by corresponding decreases in operating expenses, resulting in no impact to earnings.
Billed water consumption for the year ended December 31, 2021 increased slightly compared to 2020. In general, changes in consumption do not have a significant impact on recorded revenues due to the CPUC-approved WRAM accounts in place in the majority of GSWC's rate-making areas. GSWC records the difference between what it bills its water customers and that which is currently authorized by the CPUC in the WRAM accounts as regulatory assets or liabilities. The August 2020 CPUC decision on the First Phase of the Low-Income Affordability Rulemaking eliminates the continued use of the WRAM beginning with the next general rate case application that will be filed in 2023 and will set new rates for the years 2025 – 2027.
Electric
For the year ended December 31, 2021, revenues from electric operations were $38.3 million as compared to $37.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2020. This increase was due to new CPUC-approved electric rates effective January 1, 2021, partially offset by a 2% decrease in electric usage as compared to the same period in 2020. Due to the CPUC-approved Base Revenue Requirement Adjustment Mechanism, which adjusts certain revenues to adopted levels authorized by the CPUC, changes in usage do not have an impact on earnings.
Contracted Services
Revenues from contracted services are composed of construction revenues (including renewal and replacements) and management fees for operating and maintaining the water and/or wastewater systems at various military bases.  For the year ended December 31, 2021, total revenues from contracted services were $113.4 million as compared to $120.6 million for 2020.  The decrease was due to an overall decrease in construction activity as compared to 2020, partially offset by an increase in management fees resulting from the successful resolution of various economic price adjustments and other filings at the military bases served.
ASUS's subsidiaries continue to enter into U.S. government-awarded contract modifications and agreements with third-party prime contractors for new construction projects at the military bases served. During 2021, ASUS was awarded approximately $17.3 million in new construction projects, some of which have been completed during 2021. The majority of the remainder are expected to be completed in 2022. Furthermore, in September 2021, ASUS received a contract modification that provided for additional infrastructure assets located at Joint Base Andrews to be operated and maintained by ASUS under its utility privatization contract with the U.S. government. The operation and maintenance, and renewal and replacement of these assets is expected to contribute additional revenue of approximately $41.0 million over the remaining life of the 50-year contract, through January 2056. Earnings and cash flows from modifications to the original 50-year contracts with the U.S. government and agreements with third-party prime contractors for additional construction projects may or may not continue in future periods.
Operating Expenses:
Supply Costs
Total supply costs comprise the largest segment of total operating expenses. Supply costs accounted for 30.2% and 29.0% of total operating expenses for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.
Water segment supply costs
Two of the principal factors affecting water supply costs are the amount of water produced and the source of the water. Generally, the variable cost of producing water from wells is less than the cost of water purchased from wholesale suppliers. The overall actual percentages for purchased water for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020 was 45% and 44%,
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respectively, as compared to the adopted percentages of 34% for 2021 and 2020. The higher actual percentages of purchased water as compared to adopted percentages resulted primarily from several wells being out of service.
Under the CPUC-approved Modified Cost Balancing Account ("MCBA"), GSWC tracks adopted and actual expense levels for purchased water, power purchased for pumping and pump taxes. GSWC records the variances (which include the effects of changes in both rate and volume) between adopted and actual purchased water, purchased power and pump tax expenses. GSWC recovers from, or refunds to, customers the amount of such variances.  GSWC tracks these variances individually for each water ratemaking area. The August 2020 CPUC decision on the First Phase of the Low-Income Affordability Rulemaking, which eliminates the continued use of the WRAM, also eliminates the MCBA for GSWC beginning in the year 2025.
Supply costs for the water segment consist of purchased water, purchased power for pumping, groundwater production assessments and changes in the water supply cost balancing accounts. For the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, water supply costs consisted of the following amounts (in thousands):
Year
Ended
Year
Ended
$%
12/31/202112/31/2020CHANGECHANGE
Water purchased$77,914 $74,554 $3,360 4.5 %
Power purchased for pumping11,103 10,134 969 9.6 %
Groundwater production assessment19,412 20,392 (980)-4.8 %
Water supply cost balancing accounts *(11,295)(12,060)765 -6.3 %
Total water supply costs$97,134 $93,020 $4,114 4.4 %
* The sum of water and electric supply-cost balancing accounts are shown on AWR’s Consolidated Statements of Income and totaled $(11,421,000) and $(11,803,000) for 2021 and 2020, respectively.
Purchased water costs for 2021 increased to $77.9 million as compared to $74.6 million for 2020 primarily due to the higher mix of purchased water as compared to pumped water and an increase in wholesale water costs. The cost of power purchased for pumping increased to $11.1 million in 2021 as compared to $10.1 million for 2020, due to increased electricity costs. Groundwater production assessments decreased to $19.4 million in 2021 as compared to $20.4 million in 2020 due to a higher amount of purchased water versus pumped water.
The under-collection in the water supply cost balancing account decreased $765,000 during 2021 as compared to 2020 due to rate increases to specifically cover increases in supply costs experienced in these areas, partially offset by higher costs related to purchased water.
Electric segment supply costs
Supply costs for the electric segment consist primarily of purchased power for resale, the cost of natural gas used by BVESI’s generating unit, the cost of renewable energy credits and changes in the electric supply cost balancing account. For the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, electric supply costs consisted of the following amounts (in thousands):
Year
Ended
Year
Ended
$%
12/31/202112/31/2020CHANGECHANGE
Power purchased for resale$11,240 $10,423 $817 7.8 %
Electric supply cost balancing account *(126)257 (383)-149.0 %
Total electric supply costs$11,114 $10,680 $434 4.1 %
    
* The sum of water and electric supply-cost balancing accounts are shown on AWR’s Consolidated Statements of Income and totaled $(11,421,000) and $(11,803,000) for 2021 and 2020, respectively.
For 2021, the cost of power purchased for resale to BVESI's customers was $11.2 million as compared to $10.4 million for 2020 due to an increase in the average price per megawatt-hour ("MWh"). The average price per MWh, including fixed costs, increased to $71.94 per MWh in 2021 from $67.52 per MWh in 2020. This increase in price resulted in an under-collection of $126,000 recorded in the electric supply balancing account during 2021 as compared to an over-collection of $257,000 during 2020.

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Other Operation
The primary components of other operation expenses include payroll, materials and supplies, chemicals and water-treatment costs, and outside service costs of operating the regulated water and electric systems, including the costs associated with transmission and distribution, pumping, water quality, meter reading, billing, and operations of district offices.  Registrant’s contracted services operations incur many of the same types of expenses.  For the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, other operation expenses by business segment consisted of the following amounts (in thousands):
Year
Ended
Year
Ended
$%
12/31/202112/31/2020CHANGECHANGE
Water Services$25,781 $23,690 $2,091 8.8 %
Electric Services3,011 2,705 306 11.3 %
Contracted Services5,946 6,841 (895)-13.1 %
Total other operation $34,738 $33,236 $1,502 4.5 %
For the year ended December 31, 2021, other operation costs at the water segment increased due to increases in chemical and water treatment costs including outside service costs associated with the water treatment processes, as well as increases in water conservation costs incurred to address current drought conditions.
Other operation expenses for the electric segment increased primarily due to higher operation-related labor and outside services costs.
The change in other operation expenses for contracted services was primarily due to (i) higher bad debt expense experienced in 2020 related to certain receivable balances due from other prime contractors working for the U.S. government, and (ii) lower pre-contract costs incurred in 2021 as compared to 2020.
Administrative and General
Administrative and general expenses include payroll related to administrative and general functions, all employee-related benefits, insurance expenses, outside legal and consulting fees, regulatory utility commission expenses, expenses associated with being a public company and general corporate expenses charged to expense accounts. For the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, administrative and general expenses by business segment, including AWR (parent), consisted of the following amounts (in thousands):
Year
Ended
Year
Ended
$%
12/31/202112/31/2020CHANGECHANGE
Water Services$55,552 $55,067 $485 0.9 %
Electric Services8,694 8,639 55 0.6 %
Contracted Services19,292 19,900 (608)-3.1 %
AWR (parent)— — %
Total administrative and general $83,547 $83,615 $(68)-0.1 %
For the year ended December 31, 2021, administrative and general expenses at the water segment increased $485,000. Excluding the impact of a reduction in billed surcharges, administrative and general expenses increased $739,000 due to higher employee-related benefits, insurance costs, and regulatory costs. Decreases in billed surcharges have a corresponding decrease in administrative and general expenses, resulting in no impact to earnings.
For the year ended December 31, 2021, administrative and general expenses for contracted services decreased by $608,000 due to lower legal and other outside services as compared to 2020. Legal and outside services tend to fluctuate from period to period.
37


Depreciation and Amortization
For the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, depreciation and amortization expense by segment consisted of the following amounts (in thousands):
Year
Ended
Year
Ended
$%
12/31/202112/31/2020CHANGECHANGE
Water Services$33,384 $30,969 $2,415 7.8 %
Electric Services2,572 2,479 93 3.8 %
Contracted Services3,640 3,402 238 7.0 %
Total depreciation and amortization$39,596 $36,850 $2,746 7.5 %
The increases in depreciation expense resulted primarily from additions to utility plant and other fixed assets since 2020.
Maintenance
For the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, maintenance expense by segment consisted of the following amounts (in thousands):
Year
Ended
Year
Ended
$%
12/31/202112/31/2020CHANGECHANGE
Water Services$9,056 $11,737 $(2,681)-22.8 %
Electric Services697 985 (288)-29.2 %
Contracted Services3,028 2,980 48 1.6 %
Total maintenance$12,781 $15,702 $(2,921)-18.6 %
Maintenance expense decreased at the water segment due largely to lower unplanned maintenance incurred as compared to 2020. The need for unplanned maintenance activities for the water segment were significantly higher in 2020 than in 2021.
The decrease in maintenance at the electric segment was due to a decrease in billed surcharges as compared to 2020, which has a corresponding decrease in maintenance expense and, therefore, no earnings impact.
Property and Other Taxes
For the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, property and other taxes by segment, consisted of the following amounts (in thousands):
Year
Ended
Year
Ended
$%
12/31/202112/31/2020CHANGECHANGE
Water Services$19,041 $18,261 $780 4.3 %
Electric Services1,519 1,232 287 23.3 %
Contracted Services1,962 2,706 (744)-27.5 %
Total property and other taxes$22,522 $22,199 $323 1.5 %
Property and other taxes at the water and electric segments increased during 2021 as compared to 2020 due, in large part, to an increase in property taxes resulting from capital additions and the associated higher assessed property values. The decrease at the contracted services segment was due to lower non-income tax assessments and fees as compared to 2020.
ASUS Construction
For the year ended December 31, 2021, construction expenses for contracted services were $56.9 million, decreasing by $5.5 million compared to 2020 due to an overall decrease in construction activity.
(Gain) Loss On Sale of Assets
The gain on sale of assets in 2021 was related primarily to the sale of a parcel of non-utility-related land at the water segment with no equivalent item in 2020. The loss on sale of assets in 2020 related to the sale of fixed assets at the contracted services segment.

38


Interest Expense
For the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, interest expense by segment, including AWR (parent), consisted of the following amounts (in thousands):
Year
Ended
Year
Ended
$%
12/31/202112/31/2020CHANGECHANGE
Water Services$21,474 $20,946 $528 2.5 %
Electric Services259 767